Newsletters

June 2020 CORE Newsletter

June 2020 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

 

 CORE TO RE-START CLUB ACTIVITIES/EVENTS JUNE 15th

Thank you for your patience over the past two months, while the club adhered to government guidelines, and cancelled all activities and meetings. Now that the Alberta government has re-opened the provincial parks and has announced that groups of up to 50 people can gather in the outdoors (while maintaining such practices as social distancing), CORE can slowly begin to re-start the club. CORE executive has worked on guidelines and recommendations for trip coordinators, for the June 15th, phased-in-start-up of events.

Members are encouraged to read the Guidelines Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19 pandemic.”

With the June 15th phase in date, to restart the club activities,  if there are any complications, or the province of Alberta mandates different requirements, the organization may have to make appropriate changes.  If the situation changes a newsletter with the updated information will be sent to the members..

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2020/2021 membership year is now Open.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, CORE could not start the 2020/2021 membership renewal until May 26, 2020.  All current memberships which normally expires at the end of May is now extended to the end of June 2020, with the existing Event Calendar password remaining the same. The 2020/2021 membership applications are now open, for members and new members to join. You can signup by the “Join Now” page on the CORE website at https://corehike. org/

Message from CORE’s Executive Trip Coordinator

Wildflowers, snow-free trails, and nature blossoming in all its splendour! Time to enjoy the outdoors! CORE’s phased-in relaunch of its outdoor activities begins June 15.

Looking for ideas for trips and events this summer to post on CORE’s calendar? Why not consider the following suggestions (some more conventional than others): hikes, scrambles, biking adventures, urban walks, outdoor photography outings, wildflower explorations, wildlife spotting, bird watching, canoeing/kayaking on the reservoir, touring your own neighbourhood, outdoor scavenger hunts, star gazing and moonlight walks. (Told you that some would be unconventional! LOL).

Please contact CORE’s Executive Trip Coordinator, Carol, if you are interested in being “mentored” this summer and fall. With the help of an experienced coordinator, you could learn: how to post an event on the CORE Calendar and send it out by email; how to fill in a Trip Report; and how to safely run a trip or event. As a first step, Carol can email you some useful information on coordinating. Contact info: cmiyagawa@shaw.ca or 403-249-8028.

A Coordinators’ mentoring hike, led by Mike, was supposed to have occurred in April. This hike is on-hold due to COVID-19 restrictions. Another mentoring hike for urban hikes was also being considered. Stay tuned for future news on this topic, and a potential trip planning meeting, which may have to be done virtually.

CORE AGM May 26, 2020

CORE’s May 2020 AGM was held virtually. Approximately 25 members attended the AGM via Zoom.

June 2020 Monthly Member Meeting Cancelled due to COVID-19

CORE’s June 2020 monthly member meeting has been cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic. CORE cannot hold gatherings larger than 15 and must maintain physical distancing at all times.

Reminder, No July and August 2020 Monthly Member Meeting

In 2019 CORE Executive put forth a motion to CORE membership, starting in 2019 there will be no monthly membership meetings for July and August. This motion was passed by the CORE membership.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If  you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

Highlights of Current Event and Prior Hikes to March 1, 2020

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for prior hikes to March 1, 2020.   WE WILL BE BACK, YOU JUST WAIT!!!!  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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Wildwood Westgate Bike Ride June 19 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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High Noon and Sheep River Trail June 29, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Friendship Trail, Turner Valley Black Diamond May 11, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hailstone Butte August 25, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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West Wind Pass August 18, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News and Notes

Remember It is Tick Season:

Male and Female Tick

Tick season is here. Tuck your pant legs into your socks and check yourself and your pet for ticks after leaving a grassy or wooded area where ticks may live. Wear light coloured clothing and cover up as much skin as possible. E.G. wear a hat, long-sleeve shirt, pants.

If you notice a round red rash that spreads at the site of  a bite. Have flu-like symptoms(tiredness, headaches, sore muscles and joints, fever) you should seek medical attention.

For more information go to my article on Ticks in the April 2019 newsletter.

 

 

Parks Canada to Open Some National Parks, Historic Sites Across Canada

Effective June 1, 2020 Parks Canada will begin to offer limited access and services. While Maintaining physical distancing measures. Openings will differ across Canada. Information will be updated regular on Parks Canada website.  Until then closure is still in effect. Your annual pass will be credited for the number of months the national parks have been closed. The two week park closure in March counts as a full month.

Bus Shuttles suspended to Lake O’Hara, Lake Louise and Moraine Lake

Lake O’Hara, Yoho National Park

Shuttle services to Lake Louise, Moraine Lake and Lake O’Hara have been suspended for the 2020 season. Parks Canada cited physical distancing regulations for cancelling the shuttles.

The shuttle service to Lake O’Hara requires a reservation and all existing bookings will be refunded in full including reservation fee. As the shuttle is cancelled campers can still access campgrounds and surrounding trails on foot. Biking is not permitted on the access road. Any camper wanting to cancel their Lake O’Hara campground reservation will be refunded with no cancellation fees.

Parks is reminding hikers it is 11 km and 450 metre elevation gain from parking lot to Lake O’Hara along the access road. You must be able to return on your own. Parks Canada has limited resources for rescuing hikers.

Banff Avenue closed to Vehicle Traffic

From Banff Ave turn right or left onto Wolf Street

There is a way around. I have attached an email from Banff Parks regarding the closure.

Please note vehicle access restrictions on Banff Avenue are for the 100 and 200 blocks only.  Access around the closure is accessible on Beaver street or Lynx Street to Buffalo Street and across the bridge.

From Banff Ave, turn either right or left onto Wolf Street.

If you turned right onto Wolf Street continue to Lynx Street and turn left. Lynx Street hooks into Bear Street continue until it intersects with Buffalo Street. Turn Left onto Buffalo Street then back at Banff Ave turn right towards Sulphur Mtn, etc…

If you turned left onto Wolf Street continue to Beaver Street then turn right. Continue along Beaver Street until it intersects with Buffalo Street. Turn Right onto Buffalo Street then back at Banff Ave turn left towards Sulphur Mtn, etc…

Remember at Buffalo Street and Banff Avenue you have a Scramble Intersection. Drivers cannot turn on a red on any corner. In other words only if you have a green light can you make a right or left turn. This is not only for vehicles but includes bicycles.

 Both Alberta Parks and Parks Canada has asked the public for their cooperation to choose outdoor activities that are low risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. As any emergency assistance during this time period puts additional strain on the health care system, put public safety staff at risk, including exposure to COVID-19, which then can impact resources to support search and rescue.

White Grizzly Bear – Banff

Banff’s White Grizzly Bear has been named

The newly discovered White Grizzly Bear near Banff has been named Nakoda.

Nakoda means “Friend” or “Ally” in the native language of three Indigenous tribes in the area (Bearspaw, Chiniki and Wesley).

Parks Canada stated the bear was first spotted in 2018 but made headlines at the end of April 2020 after a social media video was sent to news outlets.

Parks Canada stated “Nakoda is a three-year old cub and has a brown sibling. The two siblings wander between Banff and Yoho National Parks. Nakoda’s white colour is believed to be caused by a natural colour phase variation, which has never been seen in the Rocky Mountains before.” Seth Cherry a wildlife ecologist with Parks Canada stated that a white grizzly is rare. Most grizzly bears are known to vary in colour from very dark to almost black. Your more typical colours are brown or blonde, occasionally you may see really light bears that almost look white.

Parks Canada stated “This is a special bear, it that it is quite unique in being almost white colour.”

Nakoda – Banff’s White Grizzly Bear and Sibling

Parks Canada has put in a NO Stopping Zone to protect the White Grizzly

Nakoda, the rare white Grizzly Bear that has been spotted in Banff National Park, has created a traffic jam on Hwy #1, as visitors want to get a photo of this white grizzly bear. National Parks effective June 19, 2020 has put in a 10 km NO stopping zone in place between Sherbrook Creek, near the Alberta/BC border and Field, BC. This restriction is to keep all bears and visitors safe. The no stopping zone will remain in effect until the bears move away as food sources in the upper elevations become more plentiful.

The Spiral Tunnels day use area and parking lot remain open. Anyone who violates this order will be subject to a fine, from $115 ticket to a mandatory court appearance and maximum fine of $25,000.

Guidelines to how the Alberta government plans to sale Provincial Parks

Alberta Environment and Parks were to release the guidelines on How the parks “partnership” would work, on May 4, 2020. Due to COVID-19 pandemic this announcement has been delayed.

 Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There have been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

 

Quote by Gary Snyder

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

Are you Prepared

As CORE re-opens on June 15, 2020 now is a good time to go thru your backpack and see if you have the essentials you need for your hike.

1. Do you have the right equipment for the hike. 

  Hiking boots and poles, gators, micro spikes, enough warm layers, including gloves and toque, extra socks, dry outer wear (rain gear).

2. Do I have enough gear for my hike to get back to the vehicle:

  First aid kit for myself, flashlight or headlamp, knife, waterproof matches or flint for fire, a thermal blanket, loud whistle for signaling, and BEAR SPRAY.

3. Bring more than enough water and food.

4. Do I have CORE’s identification card with me.

  • Emergency contact information, allergies, medication to be taken in case of a medical emergency.
  • Pin the identification card to your back pack. Or advise someone on the hike, where your card is.

5. Have you set up a contact person in case you are not back by a certain time, they can start a search for you.

  • The contact person needs information on the hiking trail location, time you should be back home.

6. Protect yourself from the sun. Bring sunscreen and a brimmed hat to protect you from getting a sunburn or heat exhaustion.

  • Under CORE, COVID-19 guidelines, you need to bring your own sunscreen and apply it yourself.

7. Protect yourself from mosquito’s and ticks.

  • Apply repeallant to ward off mosquito’s and ticks.
  • Wear clothing that is light in colour, long sleeve shirt and tuck your pant cuffs into your boots.

And Each event or activity may require different equipment. Happy Hiking!!!

 

 “Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19 pandemic”

CORE’s COVID-19 Guidelines

Keeping Members Safe on Events

 

  • Do NOT sign-up if you are experiencing any illness or COVID-19 symptoms
  • Avoid Non-Family carpooling. Meet at trailheads or a designated place for convoying.
  • Maintain physical distancing at all times. 2 metres/6 feet
  • Bring a mask for emergency use.
  • Bring your own supply of wipes/hand sanitizer/gloves/toilet paper, as necessary and your first aid kit – No sharing.
  • Do Not share food or drinks.
  • Washrooms may not always be available, be prepared.
  • Bring enough food, water, proper clothing/shoes, equipment and bear spray. No stopping prior to trailhead, or heading back.
  • Be aware of risks in participating and agree to accept these risks.
  • Remember to provide a cell phone number and emergency contact number to the coordinator when signing up.
  • No Trip Reports will be signed by members for the time being but coordinators are still required to submit a Trip Report.

NOTE: Events may be changed or cancelled at short notice due to changes in government guidelines. The requirements above may change accordingly with updated government regulations.

 

 

        Take Care, Be Safe And Have Fun!!!!  

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Newsletter Supplement “Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19 Pandemic”

Newsletter Supplement

“Hiking with CORE

in the Time of COVID-19 Pandemic”

CORE to restart activities, June 15, 2020

 

CORE will be resuming hikes, bike trips, urban walks, with more to follow.

CORE Executive has created guidelines for our members to follow, during this uncertain time for the safety of our members.

 

CORE’s COVID-19 Guidelines

Keeping Members Safe on Events

 

  • Do not sign-up if you are experiencing any illness or COVID-19 symptoms.

  • Avoid non-family carpooling. Meet at trailheads or a designated place for convoying.

  • Maintain physical distancing at all times.

  • Bring a mask for emergency use.

  • Bring your own supply of wipes/hand sanitizer/gloves/toilet paper, as necessary and your first aid kit – no sharing.

  • Do Not share food or water.

  • Washrooms may not always be available, be prepared.

  • Bring enough food, water, proper clothing/shoes, equipment and bear spray.

    • There will be no stopping at places on the way out or on the way back.

  • Be aware of the risks in participating and agree to accept the risks.

  • Remember to provide a cell phone number and emergency contact number to the coordinator when signing up.

  • No Trip Reports will be signed by members for the time being, but coordinators are still required to submit a Trip Report.

Not Maintaining Physical Distancing

NOTE:

Events maybe changed or cancelled at short notice due to changes in government guidelines. The requirements above may change accordingly with updated government recommendations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have Fun and Stay Safe

 

 

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May 2020 CORE Newsletter

May 2020 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

CORE AGM May 2020

CORE’s May 2020 AGM will be held virtually. The meeting will be at 7 pm on May 26, 2020 thru Zoom. 

An email will be sent to all members, that stated on the election survey, they would attend the virtual meeting. The information required for you to join   this virtual meeting will be emailed to you, prior to May 26, 2020. If you did not elect to be at this meeting on the election survey, and now would like to join please email the executive at mailbox@corehike.org .See you there!!!

The AGM agenda will consist of, approval of the 2019 AGM minutes, chair and executive member reports, election results of the 2020/2021 CORE executive, Trip Coordinator Appreciation, and other CORE business.

 CORE TO RE-START THE CLUB

Thank you for your patience over the past two months, while the club adhered to government guidelines, and cancelled all activities and meetings. Now that the Alberta government has re-opened the provincial parks and has announced that groups of up to 50 people can gather in the outdoors (while maintaining such practices as social distancing), CORE can slowly begin to re-start the club.

The newly elected CORE executive is currently creating procedures and guidelines for its members and coordinators on how, as a group, we need to proceed on future CORE hikes/events. The executive is working towards June 15, for a phased-in start-up of events. With this target in mind, if there are any complications, or the province of Alberta mandates different requirements, the organization may have to push this date out further. This situation is in a constant fluid motion, due to the pandemic.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2020/2021 membership year will start after the AGM (May 26, 2020)

CORE’s 2020/2021 membership renewal will be open for members and new members after the AGM on May 26, 2020.

Coordinator’s Meeting for 2020 Summer Event Planning Meeting

This meeting has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 virus, until further notice.

Valley Ridge Community Parking Lot

CORE uses the Valley Ridge Community parking lot for car pooling. CORE has been asked by the community association, when we leave our vehicles at this parking lot, to park near the east end of the lot. By the entrance to the parking lot. This is to increase safety for the “in and out” skaters accessing their gate near the west end of the lot.  The two outdoor arena’s, above this community parking lot, creates heavy vehicle and foot traffic.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If  you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

Highlights of Prior Hikes to March 1, 2020

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for prior hikes to March 1, 2020.   WE WILL BE BACK, YOU JUST WAIT!!!!  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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September 2019 Commonwealth Lake Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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September 2019 Pocaterra Ridge Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 2019 Sundance Canyon Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 2018 Weaselhead Park Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 2018 Dyson Falls Sheep Creek PP Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News and Notes

Remember It is Tick Season:

Male and Female Tick

Tick season is here. Tuck your pant legs into your socks and check yourself and your pet for ticks after leaving a grassy or wooded area where ticks may live. Wear light coloured clothing and cover up as much skin as possible. E.G. wear a hat, long-sleeve shirt, pants.

If you notice a round red rash that spreads at the site of  a bite. Have flu-like symptoms(tiredness, headaches, sore muscles and joints, fever) you should seek medical attention.

For more information go to my article on Ticks in the April 2019 newsletter.

 

 

More Wildlife is seen by Park Rangers

Due to the shutdown of the National and Provincial parks, no visitors or traffic are allowed in the parks. More Wildlife has been seen by the park rangers. They have spotted an elk herd of 40 to 50, grazing and traveling down the Bow Valley River near Banff.  As well, more bear sights.

Remember to Carry Your Bear Spray

 

 

 

 

Parks Canada to Open Some National Parks, Historic Sites Across Canada

Effective June 1, 2020 Parks Canada will begin to offer limited access and services. While Maintaining physical distancing measures. Openings will differ across Canada. Information will be updated regular on Parks Canada website.  Until then closure is still in effect. Your annual pass will be credited for the number of months the national parks have been closed. The two week park closure in March counts as a full month.

Effective March 24, 2020 until further notice, all national parks and historic sites are off limits to all vehicle traffic, unless you live there. This includes all parking lots and any parking on the highway or roadway through the national parks. You can travel on Highway #1, but you cannot stop anywhere along this highway in the parks. RCMP and Canada Parks wardens will be patrolling, and if they see a vehicle pulled over, they can give you a ticket or impound your vehicle. And all day use facilities and campsites remain closed.

Alberta Government is opening up Provincial Parks to the Public

Effective May 1, 2020 Alberta is opening up provincial park accessibility.

Vehicle, bicycle and walk in access to the parks has been lifted. Remember this phase in of opening up the provincial parks is in a  fluid state of change. Albert Health Services and Alberta Environment and Parks will be monitoring this phase in. If people are not following Public Health Guidelines for the COVID-19 pandemic this privilege will be taken away again.

 

You Must Still Follow Public Health Guidelines:

  • Stay home if you are sick – Don’t visit the parks if you are sick or were recently exposed to someone with COVID-19. You must self isolate for 10 days if you have symptoms or 14 days if you were exposed to a confirmed COVID-19 case or returned from international travel
  • Only visit parks near your home. No long road trips or non essential travel.
  • If you do drive a long distance, do not stop for food or gas, respect other people’s health and safety.
  • Everyone needs to physical distance. 6 Feet/2 Metres from each other, if you are not isolating together.
  • Try to only hike with other household members that are self-isolating together.
  • Hiking in groups is not recommended, but if you do, you must stay 6 Feet/2 Metres from each other and groups no larger than 15.
  • Be prepared. Bring your own water, snacks, hand sanitizer and toilet paper.
  • Vault washrooms are open, but you need your own sanitary supplies.
  • Avoid busy trails and popular areas. Visit early in the day, so you can head somewhere else, if the parking lot is full.
  • LEAVE NO TRACE. Pack out what you pack in.
  • Practice good Hygiene: Wash your hands frequently and refrain from touching your face with unclean hands. Carry hand sanitizer or soap and water.
  • You cannot go into communities. E.G. Bragg Creek, Canmore, Crochane.
  • Garbage pickup is still not available at this time.
  • Avoid touching rails, garbage bins, and other high touch surfaces. If you do, use gloves.
  •  Provincial and Federal governments are recommending the use use of cloth masks. This is an individual decision.

 Both Alberta Parks and Parks Canada has asked the public for their cooperation to choose outdoor activities that are low risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. As any emergency assistance during this time period puts additional strain on the health care system, put public safety staff at risk, including exposure to COVID-19, which then can impact resources to support search and rescue.

White Grizzly Bear – Banff

White Grizzly Bear Spotted in Banff National Park

On April 30th, a Canmore family got a glimpse of a white grizzly bear, while out for a drive in Banff National Park. They spotted two young bears – one was white the other was brown, eating berries along the fence beside the roadway.

Talking with bear expert, Mike Gibeau (specialist in grizzly bears and a retired Parks Canada carnivore specialist), told them it is a rare gene anomaly that makes the grizzly bear white instead of its usual brownish colour. This is not an albino bear, which is absence of pigment in the skin and hair, which are white and the eyes are usually pink. Black bear colours can be from black to white and in between. In grizzly bears it is rare.

Currently people are in self-isolation, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in a sheltered place. Bears which are typically in a sheltered place because of human activity around them, are able to come out into their natural habitats and are freer to roam.

Cougar at West Bragg Creek Trail

Cougar spotted at West Bragg Creek

A young cougar was photographed on Bobcat Trail at West Bragg Creek, on May 11, 2020.  Pay attention to your surroundings. As wildlife has become used to No humans in their habitat. Carry Bear Spray. And Walk Tall.

 

 

 

 

 Avalanche Canada shuts down its forecasting service due to COVID-19 Outbreak

Avalanche Canada stated a lack of data due to the COVID-19 outbreak has prompted the warning service to shut down its website effective immediately (March 24, 2020).

Guidelines to how the Alberta government plans to sale Provincial Parks

Alberta Environment and Parks were to release the guidelines on How the parks “partnership” would work, on May 4, 2020. Due to COVID-19 pandemic this announcement has been delayed.

 Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system.  Annual pass will be $120.00 for the calendar year.

For more information go to ASCC.

 Avalanche Season

Avalanche conditions are high in many parks. Before you go out into the mountains, verify the avalanche conditions in the area of the event. Go to  Parks Canada Avalanche page or  the direct link to Alberta Parks – Kananaskis.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There have been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

 

Quote by Gary Snyder

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

For most of us, it has been awhile since we have done any hiking. Now that the provincial parks are re-opening, and some national parks by June 1,we just want to get out to the mountains and hike. Do not rush into doing strenuous hiking, as this could lead to an injury. Start slow and build up.

For cardio endurance, walking on an incline is preferable. Start at a low incline and buildup. Add more weight to your workout, put your back pack on. Once you are use to this, start adding weight into your back pack. Then build up more mileage, and incline with your back pack on. Now put your hiking boots/shoes on. Your hiking boots/shoes are heavier than runners. Your body needs to adapt to the different weight of your shoes. As you will need to lift your feet over obstacles in a trail. Next step is to hike parks like Nose Hill, Fish Creek, Edworthy, etc ., with a filled back pack and hiking boots/shoes to get more distance and hill climbing. The extra weight in your back pack does make a difference even on these trails.  The biggest advantage of being able to get back outside, is being out in the fresh air, seeing the prairie crocuses, new buds on the trees, the Calgary wildlife and getting back to want you enjoy. I was still able to social distance (2 metres/6 feet) from others.

You also need to strengthen your legs, back, core, shoulder and arm muscles for hiking. I have chosen two videos that are specific for hikers, as theses videos use more of your own body weight as resistance, or you can add weights. No need to go to a gym! Just pick two or three exercises , then alternate.

Leg resistance could be as simple as doing lunges with a weighted object in your hands, extended outwards. Or squats with a weighted objective held just above each shoulders or at chest height. Calf muscles raising up and down on a ledge of a step. Triceps, pushing up from a chair. Whatever exercise’s works for you.

Complete workout for hikers/trekkers by Mountain Chasers.

Hiking Workout by Real Anime Training.

 

Pocaterra Ridge

Soon you will be back on the trails.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        Take Care, Be Safe And Have Fun!!!!  

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on May 2020 CORE Newsletter

April 2020 CORE Newsletter

April 2020 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

CORE AGM May 2020

April 22nd, an email was sent out to all CORE members updating you on the COVID-19 situation and How the Executive proposes to hold the May 2020 AGM.

Per the rules of Society, CORE is required to have 4 members fill the following positions of an Executive – Chair, Secretary, Treasure, Membership. We have nominations for Chair, Secretary and Membership Coordinator. CORE still needs a member to volunteer for the treasurer position. The treasure position requires reasonable computer skills. It does not matter if you are fairly new to the club, there are experienced members on the Executive and new ideas would be more than welcomed. For further information about this position, please contact Mike(chair person) per email sent out. The deadline is April 29, 2020.

We still need nominations for other executive positions, but more information regarding all of the executive positions and the AGM will be sent to you in the near future. But right now our main priority is to make sure we have the 4 vital positions.

CORE Presentation Survey

A presentation survey has been emailed out to all CORE members asking for your preference for monthly meetings and presentation. CORE executive would appreciate your feedback as soon as possible. Thank you

Effective Immediately all CORE

Events and Monthly Meetings are

Cancelled until Further Notice

Please be advised, Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, CORE executive has cancelled all CORE events and monthly meetings until further notice. Other outdoor clubs have taken the same initiative as CORE. And Scarboro Hall will also be closed until further noticed. For any further information regarding the CORE event and meetings being cancelled, please email the executive at mailbox@corehike.org.

For more information about COVID-19 virus, go to Alberta Health Services webpage.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2020/2021 membership year is Put on Hold till After AGM (May 2020)

CORE’s 2020/2021 membership renewal is put on hold due to the COVID-19 virus. The 2020/2021 membership will be available once the club recommences activities post COVID-19. CORE will advise members when 2020/2021 membership is open.

Coordinator’s Meeting for 2020 Summer Event Planning Meeting

This meeting has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 virus, until further notice.

Car Pooling Contribution Rate Revised Effective January 22, 2020

CORE executive revised the car pooling $contribution rate as of January 22, 2020. The new contribution rate is one set rate of, $0.25 cents per km.   CORE executive will re-visit if vehicle expenses go up.

CORE’s Car Pooling guideline, is to contribute per kilometer multiplied by two times the distance, from the meetup place to the trailhead, multiply by .25 cents then divide by the number of people in the vehicle. For more information on car pooling and locations go to CORE Carpooling guideline.

When car pooling, if the road has been very dusty, slushy or muddy, you should help your driver out by giving an extra loonie ($1.00) or toonie ($2.00) for a vehicle wash. Your driver will appreciate this gesture.

Valley Ridge Community Parking Lot

CORE uses the Valley Ridge Community parking lot for car pooling. CORE has been asked by the community association, when we leave our vehicles at this parking lot, to park near the east end of the lot. By the entrance to the parking lot. This is to increase safety for the “in and out” skaters accessing their gate near the west end of the lot.  The two outdoor arena’s, above this community parking lot, creates heavy vehicle and foot traffic.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If  you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

Highlights of Prior Hikes to March 1, 2020

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for prior hikes to March 1, 2020.   WE WILL BE BACK, YOU JUST WAIT!!!!  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

2019 Yamnuska Circuit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

2019 Having Fun at Healy Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

2019 West Wind Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

2019 Fullerton Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

2016 Bow Valley Provincial Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

News and Notes

Alberta Hiking Association (AHA) Survey

The Alberta Hiking Association represents more than one million Albertans who walk and/or hike in Alberta. Many of the membership belong to hiking clubs and meet up groups who organize hiking, snowshoeing, and cross country ski activities. The AHA advocates on behalf of Alberta hikers and acts as an intermediate for information concerns and ideas around issues that relate to hiking trails, trail construction, maintenance and accessibility. The AHA works to give you a voice as a stakeholder at meetings with industry and government. AHA website has a list of hiking clubs that are members of the organization.  CORE is a member of AHA.

The AHA would like to know more about what Alberta hikers and snowshoers want, to better fulfill their mandate to advocate for the interest of hikers. They would like hikers and/or snowshoers to complete a short survey. The link to the survey is on the AHA website.

CPAW’S Defends Alberta Parks, Town Hall Meeting#2

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) has been pushing to have Alberta Parks reverse their March 2020 decision for removal of 164 park sites and the closure of 20 park sites. They have been reaching out to individuals, groups and businesses who may be personally affected by these changes or whose organization, business will feel the impact of these changes.

CPAWS will be holding a virtual town hall on April 27, Monday, starting at 7 pm. You will need to register thru Eventbrite. Or email: volunteernab@cpaws.org. You can join CPAWS via Zoom to hear from Albertan’s affected by these cuts. The Town Hall will feature presentations by representatives from the perspective of conservationists, recreationist, and other impacted communities. Presentations will be followed with an opportunity to hear from participants.

If you can not make the town hall meeting, you can email CPAWS with your questions. email address: volunteernab@cpaws.org   Or you can send a letter to your MLA or Alberta’s MLA  for Park’s. Or send a prewritten letter by CPAWS to Jason Nixon – Minister of Environment and Parks Alberta, by clicking on the link.

More Wildlife is seen by Park Rangers

Due to the shutdown of the National and Provincial parks, no visitors or traffic are allowed in the parks. More Wildlife has been seen by the park rangers. They have spotted an elk herd of 40 to 50, grazing and traveling down the Bow Valley River near Banff.  As well, more bear sights.

 

 

 

 

Parks Canada closes National Parks, Historic Sites to Vehicle Traffic due to COVID-19

Effective March 24, 2020 until further notice, all national parks and historic sites are off limits to all vehicle traffic, unless you live there. This includes all parking lots and any parking on the highway or roadway through the national parks. You can travel on Highway #1, but you cannot stop anywhere along this highway in the parks. RCMP and Canada Parks wardens will be patrolling, and if they see a vehicle pulled over, they can give you a ticket or impound your vehicle. And all day use facilities and campsites remain closed.

Alberta Government is closing Provincial Parks to the Public due to COVID-19 pandemic

Alberta Parks are closed no vehicle/public traffic is prohibited from using Alberta Park facilities until further notice. This includes toilets, picnic areas and park warm-up shelters. No traffic into the parks is allowed.  You can still book campsites online. Alberta Parks will continue to assess the impact to the pandemic to the camping season and refund online reservations and waive cancelation fees, as necessary. Anyone wishing to cancel their current reservations for arrivals up to April30, 2020, will be provided a full refund or the opportunity to change their reservation depending on availability, with no penalty. Contact Alberta Parks online or at 1-877-537-2757.

Both Alberta Parks and Parks Canada has asked the public for their cooperation to choose outdoor activities that are low risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. As any emergency assistance during this time period puts additional strain on the health care system, put public safety staff at risk, including exposure to COVID-19, which then can impact resources to support search and rescue.

Avalanche Canada shuts down its forecasting service due to COVID-19 Outbreak

Avalanche Canada stated a lack of data due to the COVID-19 outbreak has prompted the warning service to shut down its website effective immediately (March 24, 2020).

Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system.  Annual pass will be $120.00 for the calendar year.

For more information go to ASCC.

 Avalanche Season

Avalanche conditions are high in many parks. Before you go out into the mountains, verify the avalanche conditions in the area of the event. Go to  Parks Canada Avalanche page or  the direct link to Alberta Parks – Kananaskis.

Grizzly Bear

Grizzly Bears are spotted in Banff and Chester Lake areas. Be Bear Aware, Carry Your Bear Spray!!!

 

 

 

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There have been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

 

Quote by Gary Snyder

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

A Clarks Nutcracker

Banff’s Bird populations Stable to Increasing During Climate Change

While climate change is affecting the range and survival of many wildlife species, scientists wanted to know what impact it was having with birds in Banff, Yoho, Kootenay, Jasper and Waterton Lakes National Park. They wanted to survey how the parks bird populations were changing over time and how climate change affected the bird population stated Jesse Whittington, a wildlife ecologist with Banff National Parks.

With 30 pounds of recording gear, including high-tech microphones, staff and researchers hiked up trails at 3.30 in the morning so, they can record data at dawn. Surveys were done in June and early July. In June, male birds are singing to attract mates. The study was recently published in the journal, Ecosphere, included 10 years of data collected in the five national parks.

There was 34,665 detections of 77 bird species collected.

The research indicates bird populations in the mountain parks are doing much better than eastern North America and Europe. Increases were for short and long distance migratory birds, but rates decreased slightly for winter residents. 91% of the birds are stable or increasing. Further breakdown shows 53% of birds were increasing and 38% were stable and 9% were decreasing.  Birds stable or on the rise: dark-eyed juncos, yellow-rumped warblers, and white crowned sparrows. Birds on a slight decline: red breasted nuthatch and black capped chickadee. This study was done from 2007 to 2016.

Biggest jump in bird population was in 2015 to 2016  which were both years with warmer and drier springs! Whittington stated “they found that at least half of the birds in their study cued into spring temperature and precipitation, so their ranges expanded during warmer springs and drier springs. Which is due to places like Banff where there is snow most of the year. It is a relatively cold, formidable place, a lot of bird species are at the edge of their range, therefore, their range has expanded during these warmer, drier springs, because they have more habitat available to them.

In respond to climate change, some mountainous bird populations may maintain their climatic niche by shifting their range up slope as long as they are not constrained by rock, ice and loss of habitat near the top of the mountain. While most birds have a climate niche related to temperature and precipitation, some birds may shift where they live in response to changes in temperature or advance the timing of breeding and nesting. Research has indicated the response of some birds to climate change may depend on their life history – whether they are specialists or generalists or whether they are migratory or resident birds. With climate change that may involve shifting their range northward or upward in elevation, or maybe they do not have to move at all if they are in their niche.

Great Horned Owl

Whittington stated the study showed, with mountain ecosystems are highly vulnerable to climate change, the study shows, increasing temperatures in Banff National Park will probably increase the habitat quality for many species but not all species, some will decline.

The Bow Valley Naturalists, Reg Bunyan (BVN vice president) states declining songbird populations world wide are mainly the result of habitat loss and insecticides. Song birds are migratory birds are directly impacted by the land management practices outside of the national parks. While it is positive news that 91% of the bird populations in the mountain parks are relatively stable, it is important to remember that mountain parks have harsh ecosystems. As a result we have relatively little bird species diversity and the results do not reflect what is happening to bird populations North America wide. The survey also, does not show why the 9% of mountain park species that are declining, some of which have experienced huge population losses. Buyan also states the survey is a broad overview. It does not show what is happening with bird species here, does not delve into how temperature affects survival rates, habitat selection, recruitment of mates and how many young they have, or how much of what we are seeing is natural fluctuations in their populations.

A report stated, this is an estimate, that 2.9 billion birds have disappeared from Canada and the United States since 1970 amounting to about a 29% decline. Greatest losses were found in species such as blackbirds, sparrows, finches and warbles.

Whittington stated birds in protected areas, where the some of the research in North America has occurred, may be more resilient to climate change, species in protected areas have had lower extinction rates and higher colonization rates compared to unprotected areas. He stated results in Banff are similar to bird studies in National Parks in the Cascade Mountains of the Pacific Northwest of the United States.  And other studies have found birds and other wildlife species are generally more resilient to climate change in protected areas. Whittington stated this points to the importance of protected areas!

Editor’s viewpoint: There are many interesting points and questions regarding the stability of bird population during climate change. One is every region has different bird types and habitation. Second is, how are the birds acclimatizing themselves?. Moving to higher elevations, to keep their normal patterns, or staying put and establishing new patterns? Third, are these birds migratory or winter birds? Will winter birds start to migrate more north? Over the next 10 to 15 years of climate warming, will these bird populations remain stable and will their habitation/territory be the same or different?

 

        Take Care, Be Safe And Have Fun!!!!  

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on April 2020 CORE Newsletter

March 2020 CORE Newsletter

March 2020 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

 

Effective Immediately all CORE

Events and Monthly Meetings are

Cancelled until Further Notice

Please be advised, Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, CORE executive has cancelled all CORE events and monthly meetings until further notice. Other outdoor clubs have taken the same initiative as CORE. And Scarboro Hall will also be closed until further noticed. For any further information regarding the CORE event and meetings being cancelled, please email the executive at mailbox@corehike.org

For more information about COVID-19 virus, go to Alberta Health Services webpage.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2020/2021 membership year is Put on Hold till Further Notice

CORE’s 2020/2021 membership renewal is put on hold due to the COVID-19 virus. The 2020/2021 membership will be available once the club recommences activities post COVID-19. CORE will advise members when 2020/2021 membership is open.

Coordinator’s Meeting for 2019/2020 Summer Event Planning Meeting

This meeting has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 virus, until further notice.

Car Pooling Contribution Rate Revised Effective January 22, 2020

CORE executive revised the car pooling $contribution rate as of January 22, 2020. The new contribution rate is one set rate of, $0.25 cents per km.   CORE executive will re-visit if vehicle expenses go up.

CORE’s Car Pooling guideline, is to contribute per kilometer multiplied by two times the distance, from the meetup place to the trailhead, multiply by .25 cents then divide by the number of people in the vehicle. For more information on car pooling and locations go to CORE Carpooling guideline.

When car pooling, if the road has been very dusty, slushy or muddy, you should help your driver out by giving an extra loonie ($1.00) or toonie ($2.00) for a vehicle wash. Your driver will appreciate this gesture.

Valley Ridge Community Parking Lot

CORE uses the Valley Ridge Community parking lot for car pooling. CORE has been asked by the community association, when we leave our vehicles at this parking lot, to park near the east end of the lot. By the entrance to the parking lot. This is to increase safety for the “in and out” skaters accessing their gate near the west end of the lot.  The two outdoor arena’s, above this community parking lot, creates heavy vehicle and foot traffic.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

Trip Reports

Please remember that the best and fastest way to send your Trip Reports to the  Executive Trip Coordinator,  is to attach the report as a pdf or a scanned photo to an email  to mailbox@corehike.org   if this is not possible, then you can bring the hard copy to one of the monthly meetings. Electronic or hard copy the trip reports must be given in as soon as possible after the event.

Event Calendar

Information on the title part (front page) of the calendar event should have the kind of event, the name of the event, the area, the kilometers, the elevation and the difficulty rating of the event – NOTHING ELSE. All the rest of the information should be in the description of the event.

e.g. Snowshoe, Hare Loop, West Bragg Creek, 7 kms, 100m, E.

Please refer to the Guides tab on the CORE website for information on Guidelines, Difficulty Ratings, etc..

Safety

Please ensure that you have with you, your membership card (with your emergency contact information) visible on your backpack, as well as your own first aid kit. Refer to the Guides tab on the CORE Website under Clothing and Equipment to make sure you have the appropriate clothing/footwear and equipment for the particular event, as well as food and plenty of water. Remember that event coordinators may refuse anyone not adequately equipped to participate in that event (hike, scramble, snowshoe, x-country ski, bicycle, etc.).

Members, you need to be aware of your own capabilities and limitations, in relation to how difficult the event is. You can check the Guidelines, Difficult Ratings for reference.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If  you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

From February 15 to March 1, 2020

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for February 15 to March 1, 2020. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

Cascade Fire Road February 15 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Sundance Lodge XC Ski Adventure February 21 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Terrace Kovach XC Ski February 29 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Mt Murray Viewpoint Snow Shoe March 1 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

News and Notes

Bow Valley Parkway

Bow Valley Parkway Mandatory Seasonal Travel Restriction 2020

From March 1st to June 25th, 2020, travel is not permitted between 8 pm and 8 am on the 17 kilometer section of the parkway from Johnston Canyon Campground to the Fireside Picnic Area. All business and commercial accommodation remain OPEN and are accessible by the Trans-Canada Highway (#1) and Castle Junction.

The eastern section of the Bow Valley Parkway traverses a small but important area of the park for wildlife. This area is important in the spring when most of the park is still snowbound, as it provides species like grizzly bears and wolves with much needed food and a place to raise their young. These animals are more aware of the presence of people, especially between dusk and dawn when their natural activity is the highest.

This mandatory travel restriction is part of an action plan to ensure the ecologically and culturally rich Bow Valley Parkway area continues as a world class setting for visitors, to learn and experience the park and as a safe and secure environment for wildlife. To learn more go to Parks Canada website.

Parks Canada closes National Parks, Historic Sites to Vehicle Traffic

Parks Canada is restricting all motor vehicle access after people flocked to the popular areas this past weekend (March 20 to 23, 2020). Parks Canada stated they still noticed lots of visitors despite suspension of service and facility closures last week. Crowding on the trails and at day use areas in the national parks and historic sites is unsafe, as it increases the risk of transmitting the COVID-19 virus. People cannot keep the appropriate 2 metres or 6.5 feet distance from each other.

Effective March 24, 2020 until further notice, all national parks and historic sites are off limits to all vehicle traffic, unless you live there. This includes all parking lots and any parking on the highway or roadway through the national parks. You can travel on Highway #1, but you cannot stop anywhere along this highway in the parks. RCMP and Canada Parks wardens will be patrolling, and if they see a vehicle pulled over, they can give you a ticket or impound your vehicle.

Parks Canada closes all Park Campsites and Visitor Facilities to the Public

Effective March 18, 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas across Canada.

The closure begins midnight Wednesday, March 18, 2020 and will be in effect until further notice. This includes washrooms, day use facilities and campsites.

Visitors will be able to use front and back country areas and green spaces but should check the Parks Canada website first to verify safety conditions and trail closures.

No new reservations for camping or accommodations can be made until April 30th, and all existing reservations will be refunded. Parks Canada states “they are working on an approach to honour passes(annual park pass) in light of travel restrictions and closures.

National parks will stay open, if people are in their private vehicles and coming out, and if you are social distancing and proper hand washing, going for a cross country ski or snowshoe is still an option.

Alberta Government gives authority to law enforcement to enact the Public Health Act under the Alberta Emergency Act

What does this Mean?   If you are caught not self-isolating, including mandatory self-isolation for traveler’s returning to Canada and not self-distancing (2 metres or 6 feet apart) you will be fined. This includes, if you are in a group less than 10 people and each person is not 2 metres, 6 feet from each other, you will be fined!!!

The Alberta government has given this authority to all law enforcement, including police officers, peace officers, park wardens, RCMP and military personnel that are working in the province of Alberta under the Alberta Emergency Act. Minimum fine is $1000 dollars per occurrence. The Alberta court can impose a $100,000 dollar fine for the first occurrence and $500,000 for the second occurrence and/or put you in jail.

Alberta Government is closing Provincial Parks to the Public due to COVID-19 pandemic

Alberta Parks remain accessible, but the public is prohibited from using Alberta Park facilities. This includes toilets, picnic areas and park warm-up shelters. You can still book campsites online. Alberta Parks will continue to assess the impact to the pandemic to the camping season and refund online reservations and waive cancelation fees, as necessary. Anyone wishing to cancel their current reservations for arrivals up to April30, 2020, will be provided a full refund or the opportunity to change their reservation depending on availability, with no penalty. Contact Alberta Parks online or at 1-877-537-2757.

Both Alberta Parks and Parks Canada has asked the public for their cooperation to choose outdoor activities that are low risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. As any emergency assistance during this time period puts additional strain on the health care system, put public safety staff at risk, including exposure to COVID-19, which then can impact resources to support search and rescue.

Avalanche Canada shuts down its forecasting service due to COVID-19 Outbreak

Avalanche Canada stated a lack of data due to the COVID-19 outbreak has prompted the warning service to shut down its website effective immediately (March 24, 2020).

 

Barrier Lake

Alberta Government Releases the list of 20 Park full or partial closures:

For more information go to Alberta Parks website.  

To view the 164 Parks for Sale Go to Alberta Parks website.

 

 

 

 

Parks with Full closures starting spring 2020:

  • Kehiwin Provincial Recreation Area near St. Paul
  • Running Lake Provincial Recreation Area north of Worsley
  • Stoney Lake Provincial Recreation Area north of Fairview
  • Little Fish Lake Provincial Recreation Area east of Drumheller
  • Bleriot Ferry Provincial Recreation Area north of Drumheller
  • Crow Lak Provincial Recreation Area south of Fort McMurray
  • Green Valley Provincial Park east of Peace River
  • Sheep Creek Provincial Recreation Area north of Grande Cache

Parks with Partial closures, some areas will remain open but non-serviced:

  • Bow Valley Provincial Park – Barrier Lake Visitor Information Centre (facility)
  • Gooseberry Lake Provincial Area west of Bragg Creek – Elbow Valley Visitors centre (facility).
  • Gooseberry Lake Provincial Park north of Consort – campground.
  • Sulphur Lake Provincial Recreation Area north of Peace River.
  • Engstrom Lake Provincial Recreation Area south of Fort McMurray – campground.
  • Chain Lakes Provincial Recreation Area north of Athabasca – campground.
  • Lawrence Lake Provincial Recreation Park southeast of Athabasca – campground.
  • Dry Island Buffalo Jump Provincial Park southeast of Red Deer – Tolman Bridge Campgrounds
  • Notikewin Provincial Park north of Manning – campground.
  • Smokey River South Provincial Recreation Area west of Grande Cache – campground.
  • Dinosaur Provincial Park northeast of Brooks – Comfort Camping (facility).

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

ASCC is a not-for-profit charity in Alberta. They have estimated the cost of providing an opportunity for visitors to experience over 20 km of observation trails to be approximately $50, 000 per year or $5 per visitor to maintain the trails and facilities. Visitor donations do not cover these costs and the government only covers less than 1% of their operation budget.

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system.  Annual pass will be $120.00 for the calendar year.

For more information go to ASCC.

 Avalanche Season

Avalanche conditions are high in many parks. Before you go out into the mountains, verify the avalanche conditions in the area of the event. Go to  Parks Canada Avalanche page or  the direct link to Alberta Parks – Kananaskis.

Grizzly Bear

Grizzly Bears are spotted in Banff and Chester Lake areas. Be Bear Aware, Carry Your Bear Spray!!!

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

New Snow Shoe Trails in Kananaskis

Check out the Kananaskis Trails for six new snow shoe loop trails in Kananaskis.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There have been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

 

Quote by John Muir

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park

Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park

Alberta Conservative Government to hand off management of 164 Provincially run parks to outside groups

Jess Sinclair spokesperson for Environment Minister Jason Nixon stated “government is subsidizing a financially struggling system year after year, while attempting to ensure maintenance, programs and services remain at a high level.” ” Alberta Parks envisions municipalities, Indigenous communities, and non-profit societies to assist with provision of park operations and quality of visitor experiences” “This will allow for focused spending in high value areas (conservation, recreation, tourism) of the parks systems and improved leveraging of resources.” Sinclair stated “the Conservative government will begin looking for partners to run the parks in May.” See list attached.

Alberta currently manages 473 provincial parks, wildland provincial parks, provincial park areas, ecological reserves, wilderness areas, natural areas and heritage rangelands.

The 2020 budget forecasts a $4 million cut to parks over the next three years. These cuts include shutting down some campsites and picnic areas, starting September 2020 provincial park employees will not be grooming cross country trails at PLPP or any other park.

Critics state the plan reduces preservation of Alberta’s outdoors to a profit and loss calculation. Opposition NDP states “Parks should not be seen as a cost subsidy. It is how the province preserves the natural heritage for future generations.”

The Alberta gov’t is marketing the province’ parks for people (inside and outside Canada) to come and visit these parks. It is the responsibility of the government to ensure these tourists receive a high quality experience. This will encourage more tourism. The new system will have varying degrees of quality. The province will not be able to hold these provincial park managers accountable. Municipalities and Indigenous groups do not have the money to look after these parks!!!!

The Alberta Wilderness association states “we are supportive if these partnerships with municipalities or Indigenous groups or non-profit societies are able to meet the very high quality experience standard.”

Joanna from AWA stated the association would like the government to show them :

  • The usage numbers for these parks:
    • How much money each park was bringing in.
    • How much money each park was losing/or profit.
    • How many nights per year were the campgrounds booked/reserved/paid for? and which days of the week?
  • How did the government arrive at these numbers?
  • AWA would also like a true cost accounting of closing the parks. E.G:
    • What is the cost to municipalities, Indigenous groups and non-profit groups to take over these parks?
    • What is the cost to the health and wellbeing of Albertans on closure of these parks?

AWA also stated:

  • Taking these parks out of the system will cause:
    • More overcrowding in other parks
    • Increase of fees
    • Ecological benefits of the parks will decrease
  • The government committed to protecting 17 per cent of provincial land and water by 2021. The gov’t has now removed 0.30 per cent of these protected areas from gov’t inventory.

A survey done in 2017 of thousands of Albertans, found that 90 per cent agree that preservation of landscapes, plants and animals was an important purpose of provincial parks. And 75 per cent stated provincial parks was important contribution to the local economy.

 

There are many petitions online. From posting photos of your favourite park to signing a petition. You can also write your MLA, and let them know your thoughts on closing these parks.

 CORE executive does not endorse any petitions. 

        Take Care, Be Safe And Have Fun!!!!  

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on March 2020 CORE Newsletter

February 2020 CORE Newsletter

February 2020 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

 

February 25, 2020 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for February’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 from 7:00pm to 9:00pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If you have an idea for a presenter, who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive and we will see what can be arranged.

February’s Presentation: Iceland

Hallgrimskirkja in Reykjavik

 

Puffin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeanette travelled around Iceland for 20 days from May 19 to June 7, 2019. Come and see that Iceland is a country of sharp contrasts between very flat green to very dry mountainous land. From Hot pools to going to a Ice Cave and many different, beautiful waterfalls. Flat straight paved roads to the windiest gravel roads she has every been on. Very modern to the very old. Also, many different domesticated and wildlife (mainly birds) that she saw and what she did during a Whale Trip.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is three quarters through the 2019/20 year and is planning trips for the remaining 2020 winter and spring seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

Coordinator’s Meeting for 2019/2020 Summer Event Planning Meeting

This meeting is for all hikers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, scramblers, camping even if you have never led an event. There will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders, who would be happy to come along with you. Mike has many guide books, maps, computers to navigate any unknown routes. This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have input on a particular trip.

CORE’s Executive Chair, Co-chair and trip coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting in April 2020 (near the middle to end of April) and a mentoring hike the following weekend. More  information will be coming in the CORE calendar and the March newsletter.

The mentoring hike will go thru the entire process from choosing your event, posting the event on the website, paperwork and what to do on the actual hike (from the meetup venue, at the trail head, while on the hike, and the return to the trailhead).

As a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of knowledge representing years of experience in the mountains. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities.

Car Pooling $Contribution Rate Revised Effective January 22, 2020

CORE executive revised the car pooling $contribution rate as of January 22, 2020. The new contribution rate is one set rate of, $0.25 cents per km.   CORE executive will re-visit if vehicle expenses go up.

CORE’s Car Pooling guideline, is to contribute per kilometer multiplied by two times the distance, from the meetup place to the trailhead, multiply by .25 cents then divide by the number of people in the vehicle. For more information on car pooling and locations go to CORE Carpooling guideline.

When car pooling, if the road has been very dusty, slushy or muddy, you should help your driver out by giving an extra loonie ($1.00) or toonie ($2.00) for a vehicle wash. Your driver will appreciate this gesture.

Valley Ridge Community Parking Lot

CORE uses the Valley Ridge Community parking lot for car pooling. CORE has been asked by the community association, when we leave our vehicles at this parking lot, to park near the east end of the lot. By the entrance to the parking lot. This is to increase safety for the “in and out” skaters accessing their gate near the west end of the lot.  The two outdoor arena’s, above this community parking lot, creates heavy vehicle and foot traffic.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

Trip Reports

Please remember that the best and fastest way to send your Trip Reports to the  Executive Trip Coordinator,  is to attach the report as a pdf or a scanned photo to an email  to mailbox@corehike.org   if this is not possible, then you can bring the hard copy to one of the monthly meetings. Electronic or hard copy the trip reports must be given in as soon as possible after the event.

Event Calendar

Information on the title part (front page) of the calendar event should have the kind of event, the name of the event, the area, the kilometers, the elevation and the difficulty rating of the event – NOTHING ELSE. All the rest of the information should be in the description of the event.

e.g. Snowshoe, Hare Loop, West Bragg Creek, 7 kms, 100m, E.

Please refer to the Guides tab on the CORE website for information on Guidelines, Difficulty Ratings, etc..

Safety

Please ensure that you have with you, your membership card (with your emergency contact information) visible on your backpack, as well as your own first aid kit. Refer to the Guides tab on the CORE Website under Clothing and Equipment to make sure you have the appropriate clothing/footwear and equipment for the particular event, as well as food and plenty of water. Remember that event coordinators may refuse anyone not adequately equipped to participate in that event (hike, scramble, snowshoe, x-country ski, bicycle, etc.).

Members, you need to be aware of your own capabilities and limitations, in relation to how difficult the event is. You can check the Guidelines, Difficult Ratings for reference.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If  you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

From January 19 to February 18, 2020

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 19  to February 18, 2020. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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January 19 2020 XC Ski West Spray River Trail Banff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 25 2020 PLPP Visitor Center to Marl Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 1 2020 Snowshoe Hare Loop Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 9 2020 XC ski Elk Pass return via Patterson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 15, 2020 Cascade Fire Road XC Ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 15, 2020 Marble Canyon Ink Pots Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News and Notes

 

Proposed route of gondola from Banff to Mt Norquay

Parks Canada rejects Gondola proposal from Banff to Mount Norquay

Parks Canada has rejected a proposed gondola to take skiers and hikers from Banff townsite to the summit at the Mount Norquay ski resort.

Parks Canada was considering a proposal by Liricon Capital, which owns Mt Norquay, to redevelop lands both inside the town of Banff and at the summit of the ski area. They have reviewed a feasibility study and other materials related to that proposal, which was submitted in May 2018.

Per Parks Canada, “There will not be further consideration of the proposed gondola nor the proposed Grizzly Pavilion and boardwalks, which would be located on lands outside the Mt Norquay leasehold. These components of the feasibility study do not conform with the agency’s policies on limits to development and ski area management in Banff National Park.”

The proposal by Liricon, which was supported by the Town of Banff, would have potentially closed the only access road to the ski hill and returned that land to Parks Canada. Visitors would then park in new lots at the train station in the townsite and ride the gondola over the Trans-Canada highway to the resort. Jan Waterous, a partner at Liricon Capital, stated “the company will be resubmitting a different proposal for the Parks consideration in the near future that addresses their concerns.” Waterous believes the project, along with some transit proposals, could be beneficial for a wildlife corridor that goes along the Norquay road. Liricon had an independent environmental study done and suggested that there would not be any negative impacts on grizzly bears, wolves and cougars. Parks Canada advised that a further study needed to be done on bighorn sheep.

Parks Canada’s position is, they place limits on development in Banff’s National Park to ensure that the area is preserved for now and for future generations.

Liricon also wanted to develop land to allow passenger rail to Banff from Calgary as part of the proposal. Parks Canada stated “the potential for train service would be subject to a separate review.”

Ivvavik National Park

Ivvavik National Park, Fly in Artic Base Camp

Imniarvik Base Camp Trips: Fly into the heart of Ivvavik National Park, Sleep in furnished Prospector tents, hike across Beringian landscapes, beneath the midnight sun. Spend time with your Inuvialuit hosts, hearing stories and learning of their culture on their traditional land. Catered and self-catered trip options. Some trips include a Herschel Island stopover (on the Yukon’s Artic Coast).  Departures June 12 to July 6, 2020. For more information Contact Parks Canada at Inuvik.info@pc.gc.ca or 867 – 777 – 8800 or Parks Canada Ivvavik National Park website.

Jen from Parks Canada sent an email to CORE asking to forward this information along to our members.

The Ten Commandments for Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain

This article was on the mountaineers website. I thought it was an interesting read. This article is regarding, if you are in avalanche terrain, “how to stay away from dangerous conditions.” The article was written by Bruce Tremper, titled 10 Commandments of Low Risk Travel in avalanche terrain.” By clicking on the title, I have created the link to this article.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

February 27, 7 pm to 8 pm – Writing-On-Stone an UNESCO World Heritage Site, presented by Aaron Domes – Park supervisor of Writing-On-Stone and Randy Bottle – Blackfoot Elder and Park interpreter.

March 19, 7 pm to 8 pm – Dinosaur Provincial Park, presented by Amber de Kam – Visitors Service Outreach Coordinator of Dinosaur Provincial Park.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

February 26, 7 pm to 8 pm – From Kananaskis Country to the Olympics. A Nordic Athletes Journey.

March 24, 7pm to 8 pm – What Bears Teach Us.

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

ASCC is a not-for-profit charity in Alberta. They have estimated the cost of providing an opportunity for visitors to experience over 20 km of observation trails to be approximately $50, 000 per year or $5 per visitor to maintain the trails and facilities. Visitor donations do not cover these costs and the government only covers less than 1% of their operation budget.

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system.  Annual pass will be $120.00 for the calendar year.

For more information go to ASCC.

 Avalanche Season

Before you go out into the mountains, verify the avalanche conditions in the area of the event. Go to Avalanche Canada or Parks Canada Avalanche page or  the direct link to Alberta Parks – Kananaskis.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

New Snow Shoe Trails in Kananaskis

Check out the Kananaskis Trails for six new snow shoe loop trails in Kananaskis.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by JRR Tolkien

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

 

Getting Lost in the Wilderness

Nobody wants to get lost in the wilderness! Proper planning and action can keep you safe.

 

 

 

1. Planning and Preparation

  • Learn how to use a compass and a map or GPS.
  • Go over the map and other guidebooks of the area in detail. Learn about the trails, streams, mountains, nearby roads and other features around the area. Find out how long the hike takes to complete, for your level of hiking. (Round trip).
  • Tell someone of your plans and the time you expect to return.
  • Pack the proper equipment and supplies. Carry essential items in case of an emergency.
  • Sign in on trailhead registers (if there is one, time and date you started on the trail) and stick to your planned route.
  • When hiking use a map (and a compass). Stop occasionally to note your progress on the map and always pay attention to landmarks as you hike. Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Check the weather forecast prior to leaving on the hike.
  • Check for trail closures or other hazards (eg: avalanche).

2. If you do get lost, stay calm. Do Not Panic.

  • S.T.O.P. (stop, think, observe and plan).
    • “S” is too simply stop. Frantically moving faster will only get you more lost. Sit and breathe, collect your thoughts. Have something to drink and eat, this will also calm you down.
    • “T” is for think. Ask yourself these questions:
      • Which direction were you going?
      • What was the last landmark you recognized?
      • How long ago was that?
      • How far have you come since?
      • Where was the last time you knew where you were? Average hiking pace is 3.2 kms (2 miles) per hour.
    • “O” is to observe. Look around you. Can you see landmarks? Can you recognize a craggy mountain top or creek? Get out your camera, go back thru the photograph’s and do the same thing. Digital photos are time stamped this will help you determine how long you have been hiking? How do you feel? How long before sunset? Is there a natural shelter nearby? Is there fuel for fire?
    • “P” means to plan. Don’t move until you have a plan. Use your whistle, someone may hear it. Do you have enough daylight to try to retrace your route? Should you consider building a fire as it is almost dark?
  • Try to return to a familiar location if within a reasonable distance. Do not go too far off your original route.
    • Leave obvious landmarks (stone cairns, piles of branches, tape around a tree(date, time and initial)) along your return path. If you need to turn back you can follow the land markers to your original start point.
    • If you manage to get back to a trail, head downhill.
    • If it is dark, wear your headlamp.
  • If still lost, stay put. Rescuer will most likely find you within 24 hours. But Only if you have left your hiking plans with someone!!!!
  • Blow your whistle to signal that you are in trouble and you need assistance.
  • Stay warm and dry. Put on extra clothing to avoid hypothermia.
  • Build a fire to keep you warm and help with your rescue.
  • Drink plenty of water. Do not let yourself get dehydrated. Purify (need water purifier tablets) the water from natural sources.
  • Seek some sort of shelter for protection and comfort. E.G. cave, rock cropping’s.
  • Eat foods to keep your energy. Only eat natural source foods (e.g. berries) if they can be eaten safely.
  • If injured, administer first aid.

3. The 10 essentials you need to carry in your backpack to survive.

  • Pocketknife
  • Matches/lighter/flint
  • Map and compass and/or a GPS tracking system
  • Headlamp
  • Sunglasses/sunscreen
  • Raincoat
  • Extra Clothes
  • Food
  • Water (and purification system – tablets)
  • First aid kit and a whistle

4. You need to know, how to use the 10 essentials above.

  • Being able to read contours on a map, knowing which is mountains and valleys.
  • Noticing features around you.
  • How to build a fire.

5. Hike during daylight hours.

  • Start hiking early in the morning, not in the afternoon.
  • Do Not start a longer hike in the afternoon, as weather can change quickly.

6. Keep Track of Time.

  • What was the time when you started on the trail head? Write this down.
  • Constantly check the time. How long did it take you to travel from point A to point B? Compare the distance to time travelled. Then how much further you need to go to get to the top of the trail. Keep track of this information. Need to leave enough time to get back down in daylight hours.

7. Taken photo’s is very useful.

  • Photos provide essential information for finding your way back, if you get lost. Digital photos allow instant previewing of pictures taken with a date and time stamp on each photo. If you took several photos along the trail, you can estimate your time, it took you to hike from point A to point B. And the photos also provide landmarks (e.g. mountain terrain, streams, etc.).

For more tips go to CORE’s blog Wilderness Emergencies.


                              Take Care and Have Fun

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on February 2020 CORE Newsletter

January 2020 CORE Newsletter

January 2020 CORE Newsletter

 

Executive News

 

January 28, 2020 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for January’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 from 7:00pm to 9:00pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If you have an idea for a presenter, who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive and we will see what can be arranged.

January’s Presentation:

The Big Bear Constellation

Creatures of the Night presented by John McFaul, Owner and guide of Alpenglow Nature Hikes.

This presentation is to introduce the constellations that parade across the night sky, their mythology and some of the interesting celestial objects that they contain.

John McFaul is a professional naturalist who has been leading nature walks and hikes for over 34 years. From 1986 – 2003 he worked for the City of Calgary as a naturalist for the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary. From 2004 to present John is the owner/guide for Alpenglow Nature Hikes. He is the president and program director and a Honourary Member of the Calgary Field Naturalist’s Society. He is a recipient of the Loran L. Goulden Award from the Federation of Alberta Naturalists.

Alpenglow Nature Hikes is dedicated to introducing Calgarians to the natural wonders of Calgary’s Nature Parks as well as Kananaskis Country and the mountain parks. He does presentations on Birds and Wildflowers of Calgary and the Rockies, hiking in the Rockies and Kananaskis Country, mammals of Lake O’Hara and Creatures of the Night constellations.

February’s Presentation: Iceland

Skogafoss in Southern Iceland

Jeanette travelled around Iceland for 20 days from May 19 to June 7, 2019. Come and see that Iceland is a country of sharp contrasts from very flat green to very dry mountainous land. From Hot pools to going to a Ice Cave and many beautiful waterfalls. Many different domesticated and wildlife (mainly birds) that she saw during a whale trip.

 

 

 

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

 Car Pooling $Contribution Rate Revised Effective January 22, 2020

CORE executive revised the car pooling $contribution rate as of January 22, 2020. The new contribution rate is one set rate of, $0.25 cents per km.   CORE executive will re-visit if vehicle expenses go up.

CORE’s Car Pooling guideline, is to contribute per kilometer multiplied by two times the distance, from the meetup place to the trailhead, divided by the number of people in the vehicle. For more information on car pooling and locations go to CORE Carpooling guideline.

When car pooling, if the road has been very dusty, slushy or muddy, you should help your driver out by giving an extra loonie ($1.00) or toonie ($2.00) for a vehicle wash. Your driver will appreciate this gesture.

Valley Ridge Community Parking Lot

CORE uses the Valley Ridge Community parking lot for car pooling. CORE has been asked by the community association, when we leave our vehicles at this parking lot, to park near the east end of the lot. By the entrance to the parking lot. This is to increase safety for the “in and out” skaters accessing their gate near the west end of the lot.  The two outdoor arena’s above this community parking lot creates heavy vehicle and foot traffic.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

Trip Reports

Please remember that the best and fastest way to send your Trip Reports to the  Executive Trip Coordinator,  is to attach the report as a pdf or a scanned photo to an email  to mailbox@corehike.org   if this is not possible, then you can bring the hard copy to one of the monthly meetings. Electronic or hard copy the trip reports must be given in as soon as possible after the event.

Event Calendar

Information on the title part (front page) of the calendar event should have the kind of event, the name of the event, the area, the kilometers, the elevation and the difficulty rating of the event – NOTHING ELSE. All the rest of the information should be in the description of the event.

e.g. Snowshoe, Hare Loop, West Bragg Creek, 7 kms, 100m, E.

Please refer to the Guides tab on the CORE website for information on Guidelines, Difficulty Ratings, etc..

Safety

Please ensure that you have with you, your membership card (with your emergency contact information) visible on your backpack, as well as your own first aid kit. Refer to the Guides tab on the CORE Website under Clothing and Equipment to make sure you have the appropriate clothing/footwear and equipment for the particular event, as well as food and plenty of water. Remember that event coordinators may refuse anyone not adequately equipped to participate in that event (hike, scramble, snowshoe, x-country ski, bicycle, etc.).

Members, you need to be aware of your own capabilities and limitations, in relation to how difficult the event is. You can check the Guidelines, Difficult Ratings for reference.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. Ifwhat activities are c you have a general question about the club, for instance oming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

December 29, 2019 to January 19, 2020

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for December 29, 2019 to January 19, 2020. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

December 29, 2019  WBC Crystal Line Snowy Owl Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

January 4, 2020 Stoney Squaw snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

January 19, 2020 Rawson Lake Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

News and Notes

WBC XC Ski Trails Fall 2019

West Bragg Creek XC Ski Trails Groomed And Ready to Go

All trails under the supervision of the GBCTA have been groomed and track set. Conditions are excellent and should last for a while with the cooler temperatures. All cross country skiers can use the groomed trails. All non-skiers are requested not to use the groomed WBC ski trails until April 1, 2020. WBC are asking people to respect the groomers hard work and only use the ski trails for cross country skiing.

To find the current XC ski trails conditions go to Bragg Creek Trails.

 

Banff, Lake Louise Snow Days

Running from January 15 to January 26, 2020, there is many activities to do and see. Including Ice Carvers (10 International Teams), Snow Sculptures, winter carnival and much more. For schedule and information go to Banff Lake Louise website.

The Ten Commandments for Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain

This article was on the mountaineers website. I thought it was an interesting read. This article is regarding, if you are in avalanche terrain, “how to stay away from dangerous conditions.” The article was written by Bruce Tremper, titled 10 Commandments of Low Risk Travel in avalanche terrain.” By clicking on the title, I have created the link to this article.

Avalanche Safety Books

The Guides Guide to Safer Travel in the mountains

This is the first fully interactive eBook that has been produced for avalanche safety. Writer is Doug Latimer from Canmore. He has 25 years as an alpine guide. The content, is based on the current best practices in the avalanche industry, and applies to all recreational people heading into the mountains in winter. The book cover all the major skills needed to support safer decisions in avalanche terrain. And covers AST1 and AST2 material. The book can be purchased for about $37 Cdn or downloaded to your PC.

Avalanche Essentials, A Step by Step for Safety and Survival

Book written by Bruce Tremper. This book is for outdoor enthusiast who wants to learn the fundamentals of avalanche awareness. You can purchase the book at any book store, and is available at the Calgary Public Library.

Canadian Pacific gives $500,000 to Alberta Wildlife Corridor

CP has donated $500,000 to the Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor in Alberta’s Crowsnest Pass. The Nature Conservancy of Canada stated “they have acquired more than 80 per cent of the required lands within the corridor area between Crowsnest Lake and Coleman.

This corridor will create a protected space across Highway 3. Wildlife use this area to migrate north and south – north to Banff and Jasper and South towards Waterton-Glacier Park and the US. This corridor helps keep the wildlife populations stable.

The Nature Conservancy of Canada will use camera’s in 2020 to find out which species of wildlife are using the corridor. All this information will then be used to determine where the wildlife overpasses and crossings will be built.

CP is helping to fund the research project and future land acquisitions, which should be completed in the next six to nine months.  

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

ASCC is a not-for-profit charity in Alberta. They have estimated the cost of providing an opportunity for visitors to experience over 20 km of observation trails to be approximately $50, 000 per year or $5 per visitor to maintain the trails and facilities. Visitor donations do not cover these costs and the government only covers less than 1% of their operation budget.

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system.  Annual pass will be $120.00 for the calendar year.

For more information go to ASCC.

Avalanche Season

Before you go out into the mountains, verify the avalanche conditions in the area of the event. Go to Avalanche Canada or Parks Canada Avalanche page or  the direct link to Alberta Parks – Kananaskis.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Quote by Thich Nhat Hanh

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environmentmailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

 

bear standing upright near tree

Alberta Parks (Kananaskis) World Renown Pole Dancing Bears

At CORE’s October presentation, John Paczkowski, Ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, gave a presentation on grizzly bear population and adversive conditioning program in Kananaskis country.  In Alberta, the grizzly bear population is threatened, and Alberta has instituted a 20-year program at reducing bear-human incidents by monitoring and conditioning grizzly bears in the region.

This study is to find out how many and were the bears are in the Kananaskis area. John and Glenn Naylor (District Conservation Officer – working out of Canmore), set up multi camera’s in the vicinity of the bears rubbing trees. On the rubbing trees they attached small barb wire to the trees at certain heights. When the bears rubbed on these tree’s they left hair samples. John and Glenn then go back to these areas and collect the hair samples. The root of the hairs has genetic DNA. They can then identify the type of bear, sex and individual identity of the bear from these samples. And how many bears use the same rubbing tree.

The camera that John and Glenn used produces still images, in the day you have colour, at night is black and white. Whatever triggers the camera sensors, a series of picture’s is taken.

Glenn had approximately 3000 plus still images of grizzly bears at these rubbing trees, doing there activity. He put these still images into a sequence, and created a video. He then uploaded this short video to his you tube account. In a few days this video had more than 350 thousand views. Glenn then uploaded the video to Alberta Parks you tube channel. Then it started being seen all over North America, then it went worldwide, with more than a million views in a week. Now up to over 3 million views. Glen was receiving calls from many news and TV stations worldwide, asking if they could use the video and/or if he could do talks on the subject. This video attention, got Alberta Parks receiving global attention. John and Glenn hope people learn from this video about bears behaviour.

BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) was so interested in Glenn’s video, they asked Alberta Parks if they could prepare a digital video on the bear’s activity at these rubbing trees. BBC set up their cameras in Kananaskis country at these specific rubbing trees. BBC took this footage and put together a video to the tune of Jungle Boogie.

Below are multiple links to various items discussed in the above article.

Glenn Naylor’s (Alberta Park Conservation Officer) Bear rubbing tree video. “What goes on (in the woods) when you are not there.”

Why and how the bear rubbing tree video came about, by John and Glenn (Alberta Parks Conservation officers), called The Bear Necessity’s.

Alberta Park Rangers,  left remote camera’s in Kananaskis Country hoping to film grizzly bears. And with the help of BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation), they put together a digital video showing bears activity at their rubbing tree to the music of Jungle Boogie. Video called “Bears Dancing to Jungle Boogie”

For more on the grizzly bear study go to, Alberta Parks Grizzly Bear monitoring and recovery Plan.

A big thank you to John Paczkowski for helping me with this article.

 

 


                              Take Care and Have Fun

 

 

 

 

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on January 2020 CORE Newsletter

December 2019 CORE Newsletter

December 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

Happy Holidays

Seasons Greetings 

CORE executive wishes their members and family a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Reminder: There is no monthly CORE meeting for December 2019

 January 28, 2020 CORE Monthly Meeting

The Big Bear Constellation

Members and Guests please join us for January’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 from 7:00pm to 9:00pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If you have an idea for a presenter, who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive and we will see what can be arranged.

Creatures of the Night presented by John McFaul, Owner and guide of Alpenglow Nature Hikes.

This presentation is to introduce the constellations that parade across the night sky, their mythology and some of the interesting celestial objects that they contain.

John McFaul is a professional naturalist who has been leading nature walks and hikes for over 34 years. From 1986 – 2003 he worked for the City of Calgary as a naturalist for the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary. From 2004 to present John is the owner/guide for Alpenglow Nature Hikes. He is the president and program director and a Honourary Member of the Calgary Field Naturalist’s Society. He is a recipient of the Loran L. Goulden Award from the Federation of Alberta Naturalists.

Alpenglow Nature Hikes is dedicated to introducing Calgarians to the natural wonders of Calgary’s Nature Parks as well as Kananaskis Country and the mountain parks. He does presentations on Birds and Wildflowers of Calgary and the Rockies, hiking in the Rockies and Kananaskis Country, mammals of Lake O’Hara and Creatures of the Night constellations.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

 Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 Course (AST 1):

CORE is organizing an AST 1 course (Avalanche Skills Training Level 1), on January 11 and 12, 2020. We highly encourage anyone playing in the backcountry to have this whether you are a skier, snowshoer or climber. You will learn to recognize avalanche terrain, understand safe travel, and be taught companion rescue. It will be taught by certified instructors (ACMG guides). Each participant will receive a certificate showing they have completed the course.  There will be one day of classroom instruction and then a full day in the field. You can be on skis or snowshoes. The use of transceivers, probes and shovels will be taught. If you do not own a transceiver, probe, and rescue shovel, you will need to tell Mike – there is no extra cost for this equipment – it is included in the course cost(these items suppled by the course instructor) . We need  exactly  8 people to get the best price where each person would pay $100 dollars, with the CORE’s Peterman fund paying the other half to meet the full standard AST 1 cost of $200 dollars per person. Last date for signup is December 28, 2019.

You will need to register for the course by email to mailbox@corehike.org, And state in the email subject line, AST 1 course forward email to Mike. Mike is organizing the AST 1 event. And by sending a cheque to CORE with a letter stating what the payment is for (See the About page for CORE’s mailing address). All payments are due before December 28, 2019. The classroom part of the course will be held at a meeting room at MEC in Calgary on January 11. The field day (January 12) will be held at Bow Summit – car pooling arrangements will be made on January 11 at MEC.

 

Car Pooling

When car pooling, if the road has been very dusty, slushy or muddy, you should help your driver out by giving an extra loonie ($1.00) or toonie ($2.00) for a vehicle wash. Your driver will appreciate this gesture.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

Trip Reports

Please remember that the best and fastest way to send your Trip Reports to the  Executive Trip Coordinator,  is to attach the report as a pdf or a scanned photo to an email  to mailbox@corehike.org   if this is not possible, then you can bring the hard copy to one of the monthly meetings. Electronic or hard copy the trip reports must be given in as soon as possible after the event.

Event Calendar

Information on the title part (front page) of the calendar event should have the kind of event, the name of the event, the area, the kilometers, the elevation and the difficulty rating of the event – NOTHING ELSE. All the rest of the information should be in the description of the event.

e.g. Snowshoe, Hare Loop, West Bragg Creek, 7 kms, 100m, E.

Please refer to the Guides tab on the CORE website for information on Guidelines, Difficulty Ratings, etc..

Safety

Please ensure that you have with you, your membership card (with your emergency contact information) visible on your backpack, as well as your own first aid kit. Refer to the Guides tab on the CORE Website under Clothing and Equipment to make sure you have the appropriate clothing/footwear and equipment for the particular event, as well as food and plenty of water. Remember that event coordinators may refuse anyone not adequately equipped to participate in that event (hike, scramble, snowshoe, x-country ski, bicycle, etc.).

Members, you need to be aware of your own capabilities and limitations, in relation to how difficult the event is. You can check the Guidelines, Difficult Ratings for reference.

 

Gloves found

Lost and Found

Found a pair of Gloves from last spring. You will need to identify the gloves. If you believe these gloves are yours, email to mailto:mailbox@corehike.org , with details of the missing gloves.

 

 

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. Ifwhat activities are c you have a general question about the club, for instance oming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November to December 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for November 23 to December 15, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

November 23 Sawmill Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

November 26 CORE’S 20th Anniversary Gala

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

CORE 20th Anniversary Dinner

 

 

CORE 20th Anniversary Dinner

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

Harvey and Carol

 

 

 

Nothing can keep me away from the party

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.……………………………………………………………………………………………… 

December 1 WBC Moose Loop X country ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

December 7 Kicking Horse Pass Ski

 

 

 

December 7 Wapta Snowhoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

December 8 Fields x-country ski

 

 

 

 

 

December 8 Emerald Lake walking from the lodge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

December 15 Warspite Lake snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

News and Notes

WBC XC Ski Trails Fall 2019

West Bragg Creek XC Ski Trails Groomed And Ready to Go

All trails under the supervision of the GBCTA have been groomed and track set. Conditions are excellent and should last for a while with the cooler temperatures. All cross country skiers can use the groomed trails. All non-skiers are requested not to use the groomed WBC ski trails until April 1, 2020. Even thou all users can use the ski trails until December 1, 2019, WBC are asking people to respect the groomers hard work and only use the ski trails for cross country skiing.

To find the current XC ski trails conditions go to Bragg Creek Trails.

 

 

The Ten Commandments for Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain

This article was on the mountaineers website. I thought it was an interesting read. This article is regarding, if you are in avalanche terrain, “how to stay away from dangerous conditions.” The article was written by Bruce Tremper, titled 10 Commandments of Low Risk Travel in avalanche terrain.” By clicking on the title, I have created the link to this article.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

ASCC is a not-for-profit charity in Alberta. They have estimated the cost of providing an opportunity for visitors to experience over 20 km of observation trails to be approximately $50, 000 per year or $5 per visitor to maintain the trails and facilities. Visitor donations do not cover these costs and the government only covers less than 1% of their operation budget.

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system.  Annual pass will be $120.00 for the calendar year. 

For more information go to ASCC.

Mistakes that are killing the World’s Best Climbers

An article in the Rocky Mountain Outlook, on why the world’s best climbers are dying at an increasing rate. The author stated ” to be at the top of the game, climbers need to be,  constantly pushing themselves harder and faster, which means less time to consider consequences and less gear to keep them safe. One of the boldest climber, Brad Gobrig died at the end of November 2019, at the age of 31. He was know for his free-solos and speed climbs. While rappelling a route, he and his partner did not check their equipment. They did not have knots at the end of the rope and did not get equal amounts of rope on both sides of the anchor for their rappel. ” They should of spent time, in at least double checking their equipment.

The idea of being light and fast, is killing the world’s best climbers. Instead of checking their equipment, finding more safer ways to get down and up, which means they would have to spend more time and maybe bring more gear.

We all want to get home safely. Slow down, find safe routes down and up, bring the correct(maybe extra) gear and double check your equipment prior to using. This is not just for climbers but for all activities in the mountains. BE SAFE.

 Avalanche Season

Before you go out into the mountains, verify the avalanche conditions in the area of the event. Go to Avalanche Canada or Parks Canada Avalanche page or  the direct link to Alberta Parks – Kananaskis.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by John Muir

… For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

CORE’S 20th Gala Anniversary

Calgary Outdoor Recreation Enthusiasts Society, or CORE for short, was started in the summer of 1999, as a casual group of hikers, under the leadership of Aimee.

CORE 2000

The summer of 1999, Aimee was working in the “Pathway Hub” located in the “Old Firehall” at Memorial Drive and 10th street NW.  She started meeting people who wanted to get out hiking. Some wanted to join a hiking club, but did not know which one to choose. (This was before google and early internet days).  Aimee spoke to many people about the need for an additional hiking club. Many of the Calgary outdoor clubs had waiting lists, or catered to the older people. She started collecting names and contact information from people who were interested in starting a new younger outdoor club.  Once she had enough names, she organized meetings during the summer to start setting up hikes with leaders. During July and August the casual group met during the week to decide which hikes to do.  In September they met on several occasions to decide whether to form an official hiking group. It took until the early November to get everything organized, come up with a name and to form an executive. To get the club established, Aimee used the Calgary Weekend Hikers guides and procedures. Once CORE was established, the founding members agreed to have monthly meetings at the “Old Firehall”. The club had to leave this facility a few years ago, and moved to Scarboro Community Center.

The original membership form was created in 1999 – 2000. This form included a very short waiver. Prior to spring, people got together to organize trips for the entire summer months and the schedule was mailed out to the members. General Club information was also, mailed out to all members.

CORE’s first executive (1999 – 2000): Evelyn, Carol, Janet, Jenny, Isabel, Aimee, Nicole and Naomi. Harvey was also, a founding member.

Today CORE’s outdoor activities  include, cycling, hiking, scrambling, x-country skiing, snowshoeing, social outings and urban walks. CORE is a member of the Calgary Area Outdoor Council (CAOC) and a member of Alberta Hiking Society (AHS). CORE is also a registered Society under the Alberta Societies Act.

CORE holds monthly meetings at 7 pm on the last Tuesday of each month, except December, at the Scarboro Community Centre.

20 Year Memorial Hike and Picnic Sept 2019

On November 26, 2019 CORE held a 20th anniversary gala. (20 years from inception, November 1999). With 10 invited guests that helped start the club were in attendance. Carol and Harvey were given life time honorary membership, for all the years they have contributed to the club. The Gala was well attended, and enjoyed by all.

A photo album was created for CORE’s 20th anniversary – 20 years of photos, click on the link to go direct to this album. The album  shows special memory’s of the last 20 years.

 

 

 

 

          Take Care and Have Fun

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on December 2019 CORE Newsletter

November 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

November 26, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

 

CORE’s 20th Anniversary Gala November 26, 2019

MARK YOUR CALENDARS – CORE is organizing “a big bash” to celebrate our 20th Anniversary.

It will take place at Scarboro Community Center (1727 – 14th Ave SW) , on Tuesday, November 26 from 6.30 pm to 10 pm. This is a ticket only event (RSVP was November 5, 2019).

Full Dinner. Slideshow. Trivia. Guest Storyteller. Cash Raffle.

Schedule of Events:

6.30pm – Arrival, drinks, snacks, welcome, slide show starts

7.00pm – Dinner seating and short History of CORE

7.15pm – Dinner buffet starts

7.45pm – Trivia contest

7.50pm – Toast

7.55pm – Celebration cake and coffee/tea

8.00pm – Entertainment starts during desert

9.00pm – Entertainment ends

9.10pm – Slide show continues, music and dance

10.00pm – Wrap up

For more details on the 20th gala event please click on this 20th anniversary Gala link.  Or go to the home page of CORE Website and click on 20th anniversary newsletter.

 A “memories” photo album has been setup on the CORE photos site (2019 – CORE20ANV) and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

Reminder: There is no Monthly CORE Meeting for December 2019

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

 Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 Course (AST 1):

CORE is organizing an AST 1 course (Avalanche Skills Training Level 1), on January 11 and 12, 2020. We highly encourage anyone playing in the backcountry to have this whether you are a skier, snowshoer or climber. You will learn to recognize avalanche terrain, understand safe travel, and be taught companion rescue. It will be taught by certified instructors (ACMG guides). Each participant will receive a certificate showing they have completed the course.  There will be one day of classroom instruction and then a full day in the field. You can be on skis or snowshoes. The use of transceivers, probes and shovels will be taught. If you do not own a transceiver, probe, and rescue shovel, you will need to tell Mike – there is no extra cost for this equipment – it is included in the course cost . We need  exactly  8 people to get the best price where each person would pay $100 dollars, with the CORE’s Peterman fund paying the other half to meet the full standard AST 1 cost of $200 dollars per person. Last date for signup is December 28, 2019.

You will need to register for the course by email to mailbox@corehike.org, And state in the email subject line, AST 1 course forward email to Mike. Mike is organizing the AST 1 event. And by sending a cheque to CORE with a letter stating what the payment is for (See the About page for CORE’s mailing address). All payments are due before December 28, 2019. The classroom part of the course will be held at a meeting room at MEC in Calgary on January 11. The field day (January 12) will be held at Bow Summit – car pooling arrangements will be made on January 11 at MEC.

Event Coordinators  2019/2020 Winter Planning Meeting

The 2019/2020 Winter Planning Meeting will be held on December 3, 2019. The meeting will be held at Mike’s place. More information will be coming soon thru CORE event calendar.

Car Pooling

When car pooling, if the road has been very dusty, slushy or muddy, you should help your driver out by giving an extra loonie ($1.00) or toonie ($2.00) for a vehicle wash. Your driver will appreciate this gesture.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

Trip Reports

Please remember that the best and fastest way to send your Trip Reports to the  Executive Trip Coordinator,  is to attach the report as a pdf or a scanned photo to an email  to mailbox@corehike.org   if this is not possible, then you can bring the hard copy to one of the monthly meetings. Electronic or hard copy the trip reports must be given in as soon as possible after the event.

Event Calendar

Information on the title part (front page) of the calendar event should have the kind of event, the name of the event, the area, the kilometers, the elevation and the difficulty rating of the event – NOTHING ELSE. All the rest of the information should be in the description of the event.

e.g. Snowshoe, Hare Loop, West Bragg Creek, 7 kms, 100m, E.

Please refer to the Guides tab on the CORE website for information on Guidelines, Difficulty Ratings, etc..

Safety

Please ensure that you have with you, your membership card (with your emergency contact information) visible on your backpack, as well as your own first aid kit. Refer to the Guides tab on the CORE Website under Clothing and Equipment to make sure you have the appropriate clothing/footwear and equipment for the particular event, as well as food and plenty of water. Remember that event coordinators may refuse anyone not adequately equipped to participate in that event (hike, scramble, snowshoe, x-country ski, bicycle, etc.).

Members, you need to be aware of your own capabilities and limitations, in relation to how difficult the event is. You can check the Guidelines, Difficult Ratings for reference.

 

 

Gloves found

Lost and Found

Found a pair of Gloves from last spring. You will need to identify the gloves. If you believe these gloves are yours, email to mailto:mailbox@corehike.org , with details of the missing gloves.

 

 

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October to November  2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for October 16 to November 15, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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October 20 Sundance Canyon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 26 Dance Night Triwood Community

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 31 Halloween Night Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 2 Seasons of Bowness Park Lunch and Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 9 Nose Hill Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News and Notes

LG Versant Snowshoes

The Norseman Outdoor Specialist Offering Discount on LG Versant Snowshoes

The Norseman shop is offering a discount special on LG Versant Snowshoes with Leki Corklite poles and LG snowshoe bag – $450 value for $329, when purchased as a set. For more information call Norseman Outdoor Specialist at 403 – 249 – 5451,  4655 – 37th Street SW.

 

 

 

Know the Snow Event being held by MEC

MEC is hosting free talks on winter safety, gear and pro tips for all that is winter.  For more information I have attached links to both stores.

MEC downtown, is hosting these seminars on November 23 and 24: On November 23 they are hosting 5 different winter topics, from snowshoeing to winter camping, including Ice Climbing Safety presented by the Alpine Club of Canada. On November 24th, there are 4 winter topics, including the MT Harvey case study (on how an avalanche was triggered by climbers) presented by Avalanche Canada.

MEC south, is hosting one day of seminars on November 23: they will have 5 winter topics from x-country skiing to a presentation by Avalanche Canada, they will be showing you on how to used the online tools and resources on the Avalanche Canada website.

WBC XC Ski Trails Fall 2019

West Bragg Creek XC Ski Trails Groomed And Ready to Go

With the recent snowfall on November 6th, 9th and 10th, the Greater Bragg Creek Trail Association ski groomers have started winter trail grooming. All cross country skiers can use the groomed trails. All non-skiers are requested not to use the groomed WBC ski trails until April 1, 2020. Even thou all users can use the ski trails until December 1, 2019, WBC are asking people to respect the groomers hard work and only use the ski trails for cross country skiing.

 

 

 

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

November 21, 2019 , 7 pm to 8 pm, at Fish Creek Learning Center Shannon Terrance, Fish Creek Park – Exploring the Ice Age across Alberta

Presenter is Dr. Chris Jass – Curator of Quaternary Palaeontology of the Royal Alberta Museum. Exploring the ice age fossil record found in caves, gravel pits, lakes and river drainages across Alberta. Fossil remains recovered from these field projects reveal hints of the landscapes occupied by both extinct and living animals highlighting the ancient and modern biota. Dr. Jass will take you to different palaeontolgy sites across the province and highlight what that sites tell us about the Ice Age history of Alberta and to discuss how that information is relevant today. Cost for this event is $10.00. For more information and how to register for this event go to Friends of  Fish Creek Park event calendar.

November 23, 2019, 1 pm to 4 pm, Hull’s Wood Day Use, Fish Creek ParkFish Creek Family Day Nature Day free event – you need to register go to Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar.

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Rolling Grasslands Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park

Glenbow Ranch December 3, 2019 – Giving Tuesday

“Be part of the #GivingTuesday movement on December 3rd and help Glenbow Ranch Park Foundation fight invasive species, prevent soil erosion and maintain trails. For a little as $25, you can support one hour of vegetation management at Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park.” Glenbow Ranch survives on donations by the public and organizations.

What is giving Tuesday, “It is the Opening day of the giving season”, it is time when charities, companies and individuals join together and rally for a favourite cause. It was started in Canada by a group of organizations including GIV3, canadahelps.org, and now includes over 6,500 partners.

On how to donate to Glenbow Ranch and other activities and trail reports go to Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

ASCC is a not-for-profit charity in Alberta. They have estimated the cost of providing an opportunity for visitors to experience over 20 km of observation trails to be approximately $50, 000 per year or $5 per visitor to maintain the trails and facilities. Visitor donations do not cover these costs and the government only covers less than 1% of their operation budget.

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system. If you purchase your pass now until December 15, 2019, you will be able to access an early-bird price of $100 for the year. The regular price after December 15 for an annual pass will be $120 for the calendar year. If you are a frequent visitor to the park purchase your pass early.

For more information go to ASCC.

Bears get into car

Port Moody, B.C. Police find a bear locked in a Car

Police were called to a home in Port Moody, B.C. for a report of a theft from a vehicle in progress. “On arrival, police knew they were not going to arrest a human, but rather help a black bear that was trying to get out of the homeowner’s car.”

The bear gained entry to the vehicle by pulling on the door handle (vehicle was not locked), when the bear was rummaging thru the vehicle looking for food, the bear must of hit the door lock. Members of the BC Conservation Office were called out to assist and eventually open the door to let the bear out.

Bears have a keen sense of smell and keeping open food in vehicles can entice bears to break in and scavenger for food.

Keep your vehicle locked, you don’t know who the thief could be!!!!

Whirling Disease Cycle

Johnson Lake in Banff National Park, Being Drained Due to Whirling Disease

Parks Canada has taken a major step to stop whirling disease, by partially draining Johnson Lake. They are lowering the reservoir water levels in an effort to eliminate the parasite and save endangered trout in the area. Crews have removed most of the fish from the lake and are lowering the water level as the final step.

Johnson Lake is currently closed to the public and will remain off limits until May of 2020, while work is being done. Bill Hunt, Banff’s resource conservation manager, stated “It is very important that the disease does not move from this water body into adjacent water bodies.” Johnson Lake sits close to two other water bodies that tie into habitat for salmonid, like cutthroat trout. The Westslope Cutthroat Trout is a threatened species in Canada, and the purest strain of this trout are only found in Banff National Park.

Salmonid is a family of elongate bony fishes that have the three vertebrae upturned. This includes salmon, trout, char, freshwater whitefish and graylings.

The name whirling disease comes from the erratic swimming patterns of infected fish. It is an invasive microscopic parasite that requires a salmonid and aquatic-worm as hosts. It is completely safe for humans and animals. But it does affect members of the salmonid family, like trout(affects several trout species including cutthroat and bull troat, both are threatened species), whitefish and char.

Per Jon Mee, professor of biology at Mount Royal University, “rainbow and cutthroat trout can have up to 90 per cent mortality at the juvenile stage if they are infected.”

You can help in the fight to stop the spread of whirling disease by cleaning, drain and dry all your boats, fishing gear, water gear(including PDF’s), as you leave a water body.

Pyramid Mountain Jasper, Red shows Pine Beetle destruction

Alberta Budget adds $5 Million to Fight Mountain Pine Beetle

October 31, 2019 Forestry Minister Devin Dreeshen stated “the fight on Mountain Pine Beetle is being increased from $25 million to $30 million.” The money will be spent on monitoring beetle infestations as well as on early attack programs. The program is regional right now. The western part of the province is severely infected. Go to Jasper and see the massive dead red standing trees. There is $11 billion of forest that is susceptible to this disease and the province needs to get in front of this problem.

Paul Whittaker of the Alberta Forest Products Association stated “that the Hinton area continues to be the most threatened as the beetles are migrating from Jasper National Park. The major problem of not fighting the beetle is the huge fire risk associated with the increase in dead pine trees. Last years cold winter helped slow down the beetle migration, as it killed 90% of the new larvae.

The government of Saskatchewan is sending money to the government of Alberta to help in the fight against the beetle. They understand if the beetle is not stopped in Alberta it will invade Saskatchewan.

The Federal government has invested $11.7 million in beetle related research in Alberta. And has five full time researchers in the province of Alberta including one in Jasper National Park and assist the province of Alberta in scientific monitoring and research, including a risk assessment of the threat of Mountain Pine Beetle to Canada’s boreal and eastern pine forests. The report was released in June 2019. The Federal Government has not financed any monies to help fight the mountain pine beetle.

No beetles have advanced past Lac la Biche.

Jasper has 93,000 hectarces of forest covered in mountain pine beetle. Half of the pine trees in Jasper Park. Risk of fire is great in the Jasper area. The National Park service will be setting some prescribed burns, around the town and major attractions. But they cannot burn all the areas the beetle has destroyed.

Editors opinion: if the Federal government had taken an active role (not just research and monitoring) in trying to prevent the mountain pine beetle from spreading, Jasper National Park forests may not be in the condition it is today. Years prior, the federal government needed to do a constant survey of the forests, by drone, to determine if there was any mountain pine beetle damage, then go in and log/burn the area to destroy the pine beetle. This would have slowed the pine beetle progression from spreading. Instead the federal government took an hands off approach to the problem.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Dr. Seuss hiking quote

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Jackrabbit Cross Country Skiing Programs In Canada

Jackrabbit Johannsen

Jackrabbit cross country skiing programs was named after Herman “Jackrabbit” Smith Johannsen (1875 to 1987). He pioneered cross country skiing in Canada and the “Jackrabbit” children’s ski programs are named after him.

You must feel the tug of your muscles as you near the top of a long grade, and know the joy of making your own track down an unbroken expanse of powder snow. This is skiing. This is adventure!

Jackrabbit Johannsen, circa 1946.

Often when I have been out with “younger” skiers, or those who have not experienced the trails in Ontario and Quebec, I find they think that childrens’ Jack Rabbit ski programs have something to do with bunnies hopping through the woods. In fact cross country skiing in Canada and the US was pioneered by Jackrabbit Johannsen, who spent many years in the Laurentians carving out trails and popularizing the sport. You can find this statue of “Jackrabbit” in the Sports Hall of Fame at COP, right here in Calgary. Check out this slightly dated NFB film (https://www.nfb.ca/film/jack_rabbit/) featuring Jackrabbit and the Canadian Ski Marathon.

In 1972, Jackrabbit Johannsen was awarded the Order of Canada. In the 1970s, he was a patron of the Canadian Ski Marathon and became involved in the Jackrabbit Ski League, a national ski program named in his honour and responsible for training thousands of young skiers. In 1982, at the age of 107, he was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.

Here is a YouTube video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S93NT78CroM&t=2s) where he is interviewed (en francais) by a reporter from Radio Canada. At one point he says (my translation): “Canada in February and March is much better than Florida.” Wouldn’t you agree?

You can find the complete story of his life and accomplishments at this link.(http://laurentian.quebecheritageweb.com/article/herman-jackrabbit-smith-johannsen-1875-1987

 

 Alberta and Canada at Risk Species:

October’s presentation was on “Alberta’s grizzly population is an endangered species.” Pamela brought in John from the Alberta Environment and Parks to speak about the grizzly population and how the province of Alberta is monitoring and increasing the grizzly population in Alberta. This was a very informative presentation. I was not even aware that the grizzly bear is an endangered species in Alberta. This started me thinking how many other endangered species there is in Alberta and Canada. And is there any crossover between the provinces. And what are the provincial and federal governments doing to stop our endangered species from becoming extinct.

Alberta at Risk Species:

Based on 2015 records from Alberta Environment and Parks, there is 132 species of amphibians, birds, fish, mammals and reptiles, ranging from Sensitive to Endangered in the province of Alberta. This does not include species that are extinct.

Per the Alberta Wildlife Act the following are a few of the species at risk:

  • Bald Eagle – Sensitive
  • Ferruginous Hawk – At Risk – Designated as Threatened
  • Peregrine Falcon – At Risk – Designated as Threatened
  • Burrowing Owl – At Risk – Designated as Threatened
  • Grizzly Bear – At Risk – Designated as Endangered
  • Canada Lynx – Sensitive
  • Bobcat – Sensitive
  • Swift Fox – At Risk – Designated as Endangered
  • Wood Bison  – At Risk – Designated as Endangered (has made a slight comeback)
  • Bull Trout – At Risk – Designated as Endangered
  • Woodland Caribou – At Risk – Designated as Endangered

Canada at Risk Species:

As of 2017 there are 521 plant and animal species that are considered at risk under the Canada Species at Risk Act.

A few of the Species that are classified as endangered are:

  • Grizzly Bear
  • Atlantic Cod
  • Spotted Owl
  • Beluga Whale
  • Woodland Caribou
  • Snapping Turtles
  • Monarch Butterflies

Grizzly Bear

There are many endangered species that are common between the provinces, territories and the federal government.

What are the Provinces, Territories and Federal government’s doing to protect our wildlife?

The provinces and territories have their own species at risk legislation and the federal government has the federal species at risk act. These acts are to prevent wildlife species from becoming extinct and implementing the measures for their recovery. It gives legal protection to wildlife and their habitat in order for them to survive.

The provincial, territories and federal government’s have spent millions of dollars for studies on why the species has become endangered, and what needs to be done to help the species to survive. All three level of governments have failed to protect the critical habitat, which means that the species don’t have the chance to recover, from the decline in populations.

A good part of the reason some of these species are endangered, is due to industry, recreation and human expansion into the habitats of these endangered species. The governments recognize that to help endangered species that they need to protect their habitat. They also, recognized that if they took away this habitat from industry, recreation and human expansion, economically an area may not survive.

All levels of government need to draw a balance between industry, recreation and the habitat for the wildlife, for these species to return to sustainable levels. All levels of government need to be held responsible for these endangered species!

 

          Take Care and Have Fun

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on November 2019 CORE Newsletter

October 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

October 29, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for October’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

October Presentation by Alberta Environment and Parks: Grizzly Bear Management

 

Join John Paczkowski, Park Ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, will give a presentation on grizzly bears in the Kananaskis Region and beyond.  John will first present on the latest grizzly bear population census work for grizzly bear management area 5, which includes Kananaskis Country down to the Crowsnest Pass. There will then be a discussion about the aversive conditioning program in Kananaskis country. For almost 20 years the program is aimed to reduced bear-human incidents by monitoring and conditioning grizzly bears in the region.

Alberta Environment and Parks “supports environmental conservation and protection, sustainable economic prosperity, quality of life and outdoor recreation opportunities.”

In Alberta, Grizzly Bears are designated as an “AT Risk SPECIES.”  The province has instituted a Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan.

Reminder: There is no Monthly CORE Meeting for December 2019

UPCOMING EVENTS:

 

CORE’s 20th Anniversary Gala November 26, 2019

MARK YOUR CALENDARS – CORE is organizing “a big bash” to celebrate our 20th Anniversary.

It will take place at Scarboro Community Center (1727 – 14th Ave SW) , on Tuesday, November 26 from 6.30 pm to 10 pm

There will be a sumptuous sit down dinner, professional entertainment, quizzes, prizes, cash raffle and a slide show of events over the past 20 years. This promises to be the biggest event ever held by CORE.

Cost for Members: $ 20.00                              Non-members: $ 35.00

You need to RSVP by November 5th.

To attend this event, please go to the CORE Home page, click on Activities and Choose 20ANV Gala Registration.

For more details on schedule of events, how to register for this great event, please click on this 20th anniversary Gala link.  Or go to the home page of CORE Website and click on 20th anniversary newsletter.

 A “memories” photo album has been setup on the CORE photos site (2019 – CORE20ANV) and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

 

2019  Avalanche Awareness Events at U of C

Avalanche Canada holds Avalanche Awareness Presentation at U of C, November 7, 2019:

Avalanche Canada is having an avalanche awareness event in Calgary, November 7, at the University of Calgary. This is a great opportunity to refresh your knowledge of avalanche risks prior to getting into the mountains this winter. Especially targeting snowshoer’s/cross-country skiers or people who like being in the winter backcountry, but do not have much/any avalanche experience.

The Avalanche Awareness Event is being held at University of Calgary, November 7, 2019, Doors open at 6.30 pm,  Presentation starts at 7.00 pm. Science Theatres #148. Use the U of C room finder.   Admission is Free. 

If you want to park at the University, use Lot 21 outside the Math/Sciences building. Group Meetup and a short walk: You can park at the far EAST end of the Brentwood Park and Ride, right where 31st Street enters the LRT parking lot (Google 32 Ave and 31 Street NW). Meetup at 6.15pm. It is a 15 minute walk over to the University. See CORE calendar for more information.

 

Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 Course (AST 1):

CORE is organizing an AST 1 course (Avalanche Skills Training Level 1), on January 11 and 12, 2020. We highly encourage anyone playing in the backcountry to have this whether you are a skier, snowshoer or climber. You will learn to recognize avalanche terrain, understand safe travel, and be taught companion rescue. It will be taught by certified instructors (ACMG guides). Each participant will receive a certificate showing they have completed the course.  There will be one day of classroom instruction and then a full day in the field. You can be on skis or snowshoes. The use of transceivers, probes and shovels will be taught. If you do not own a transceiver, probe, and rescue shovel, you will need to either purchase or rent the equipment for the course(ask Mike where). We need a minimum of 8 people to get the best price where each person would pay $100 dollars, with the CORE’s Peterman fund paying the other half to meet the full standard AST 1 cost of $200 dollars per person. Last date for signup is December 28, 2019.

You will need to register for the course by email to mailbox@corehike.org, And state in the email subject line, AST 1 course forward email to Mike. Mike is organizing the AST 1 event. And by sending a cheque to CORE with a letter stating what the payment is for (See the About page for CORE’s mailing address).

Event Coordinators Guidelines

A reminder to all event coordinators that a Trip Report Form is a requirement for all official CORE events (4+ people including coordinator). This includes hikes, bike trips, snowshoe and ski trips, guided backcountry trips and workshops and training courses that are sponsored by CORE.

New:  Event coordinators may now submit Trip Reports for unofficial (<4 people) events, and social events so they are acknowledged for the event in the database.

All Trip Reports should be provided to the Executive Trip Coordinator   in electronic or in hard copy form. For electronic submission, scanned PDF, or photo of the trip report emailed to mailbox@corehike.org as soon as possible after the event is fine. Event Coordinators Guidelines are posted on the CORE website at corehike.org.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September and October 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September 21, 2019 to October 15, 2019Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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September 14 – Memorial Hike and Picnic

History of CORE’s Annual Memorial Hike:

In 2010, after the passing of the 3rd CORE member, it was decided to have an Annual Memorial Hike in their honor. The first hike was Powderface Ridge summit on September 18, 2010. A Memorial Hike has been held each year around September to honor the, now 5 CORE members who have sadly passed away.

In Memoriam:

Will Farrington – 2007

Branko Peterman – 2009

Deb Side – 2010

Gary Bernhard – 2013

Allan Side – 2016

The 2019 Memorial Hike was well attended. 26 members took part in the hike and 28 members attended the potluck.

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September 14 Memorial Hike and Picnic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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September 14 Memorial Picnic

 

 

 

September 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

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September 14

 

 

 

September 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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September 21 Eagle Hill Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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September 21 Pocterra Ridge Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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September 22 Commonwealth Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 6 Cochrane Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Below are some recipes from the Memorial Picnic:

Cranberry-Bran Muffins:

Prep Time 15 minutes, Total Time 35, 12 servings, 1 muffing (82 g) each:

What you Need:

-2 Cups whole wheat flour                                   -1.5 cups wheat bran

-4 tsp Magic Baking Powder                                -1 tsp ground nutmeg

-1 tsp ground cinnamon                                        -1 tsp ground nutmeg

-1/2 tsp baking soda                                               -1/2 tsp salt

-1 egg                                                                          -1  1/4 cups milk

-1/3 cup canola oil                                                   -1/3 cup molasses

-1/3 cup packed brown sugar                                -1 cup frozen cranberries

If your molasses is a bit thick, warm it in the microwave for a few seconds so it is fluid enough to mix with other ingredients.

Make It

Heat Oven to 400 degrees F.

Combine first 7 ingredients in large bowl. Whisk egg, milk, oil and molasses in medium bowl until blended. Stir in sugar. Add to flour mixture, stir just until blended. Stir in cranberries. Spoon into 12 muffin pan cups sprayed with cooking spray. Bake 20 minutes or until toothpick inserted in centers comes out clean. Cool muffins in pan for 5 minutes. Remove to wire rack, cool completely.

Lemon Drizzle Loaf:    (Yes a hint of England)

Makes: one 10 in. by 4 in. (25 cm by 10 cm) loaf cake, which cuts into 8 slices

For the Sponge:

-1 cup plus 3 tbsp. (295 ml) unsalted butter, softened, plus more for greasing the pan.

-1 & 1/3 cups (330 ml) sugar                           -3 eggs

-Zest of 3 or 4 lemons (save the juice for the lemon drizzle and icing)

-1 & 3/4 cups plus 2 tbsp. (460 ml) baking powder                -1/4 (1 ml) salt

-6 & 1/2 tbsp. (97.5 ml) milk

The Lemon Drizzle:

-1 tbsp. (15 ml) sugar           -1 tbsp. (15 ml) water            – 2 tbsp. (30 ml) fresh lemon juice

The Icing:

-1 & 3/4 cups (430 ml) confectioners sugar            -2 tbsp. (30 ml) lemon juice

1. Preheat oven to 355 F (180 C: 325 F or 160 C convection)

  1. Butter a 10-in.-by-4-in. (25-cm-by-10-cm) loaf pan and line the base and sides with parchment paper, extending the paper about 2 in. (5 cm) above the top of the pan.
  2. First, make the sponge. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream the butter and sugar well, though you don’t want as fluffy a mixture as you would for a layer cake. Zest the lemons into the butter mixture and mix thoroughly. Beat in the eggs one at a time, making sure each one is thoroughly mixed in before adding the next.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Mix half of this into the creamed butter mixture, scraping down the sides, until barely combined.
  4. While the mixer is still going, beat in all the milk. Then add the remaining flour and mix until just combined. Scrape the bowl and give it one last mix.
  5. Scoop the mixture into the prepared pan and smooth the top with an icing spatula or rubber spatula.
  6. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until the top of the cake is springy and an inserted skewer comes out clean.
  7. To make the lemon drizzle, combine the sugar, water and lemon juice in a small pan and heat just until the sugar is melted. Do not let this boil, or the fresh flavour will be lost.
  8. Use a skewer to poke holes evenly throughout the baked loaf. Pour the lemon drizzle over the loaf and let it soak in while you make the icing.
  9. In a small bowl, whisk together the confectioners’ sugar and lemon juice until smooth.
  10. To remove the loaf cake from the pan, run a small paring knife along the inside of the pan, then tilt the pan on its side and coax the loaf out, using the parchment paper as a handle. Peel off the paper and turn the loaf upright on your cooling rack or worktop.
  11. Drizzle the icing over the loaf and let it drip down the sides. Use a spatula to lift the loaf onto a serving dish. This keeps well for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

African Peanut Stew:

Ingredients:

-Chickpeas, drained and rinsed 1 – 15 oz. can    -Vegetable or Chicken stock 4 cups

-Sea Salt or Regular Salt 1/4 tsp                           -Fresh Ground Pepper to taste

-Cumin 1 tsp                                                              -Cayenne 1/4 tsp

-Tomatoes Diced (including juice)                        -Spanish onion, small diced 1

-Sweet Potatoes, cut into 1/2 inch cubes roughly 2 medium sweet potatoes 4 – 5 cups

-All Natural Peanut Butter (Creamy) 1/2 cup       -Garlic, minced 4 cloves

-Fresh Ginger, minced 1 inch                                   -Margi 10 drops

Method:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a 6 quart slow cooker.
  2. Mix well
  3. Cook on low for 6 to 8 hours
  4. Serve warm directly from the slow cooker with Nan bread.

To make the recipe Vegan use vegetable Stock.

Serves 8

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News and Notes

The Norseman Outdoor Specialist October Ski Waxing Special:

CORE October Special: Every second pair of similar XC skis(e.g. waxable vs wax-less) can be serviced at half price provided that they are brought in to The Norseman for service at the same time.

CORE members with XC Skis: For the month of October the Norseman Outdoor Specialist is offering a half price special on for waxing every second pair of skis. So, if you want to get together with another CORE member or other friends and bring in 2 pairs of skis for waxing, you can share the cost. (36 + 18)/2 = $27 for waxable skis, (22+11)/2 = $16.50 for wax-less. Both skis have to be the same type.

Option 1:  Waxable Skis $36 Grip Pocket Preparation: 1. Clean off old wax, etc.,  2. Locate and mark the correct grip pocket,  3. Sand bases smooth as required,  4. Wax grip pocket with base binder wax,  5. Wax tips and tails with glide wax.

Option 2:  Wax-less Skis $22 Clean and Hot Wax , 1. Clean off old wax, etc.,  2. Sand bases smooth as required,  3. Hot wax entire ski with glide wax.

If you have and questions you can call Peter Minions or Anthony Mauriks at the Norseman, 403 – 249 – 5451. Address 4655 – 37th Street SW.

2019 Calgary New and Used Ski Show:

2019 Calgary New and Used Ski Sale

New and used Ski Sale and Show at Max Bell Centre, from October 25 to 27, 2019.

You need to pre-register your items for sale, bring the registration form along with your items to the Equipment Drop-off on Wednesday or Thursday (October 23 and 24,2019). For more information go to 2019 Calgary New and Used Ski Sale.

 

Ann and Sandy Cross Conservation Area Events:

ASCCA Honey for Sale: ASCCA honey is made by their own bees. The honey is unpasteurized and all-natural. Proceeds will help ASCCCA continue to care for their bees and will support conservation and education programs.They will be selling honey in large jars (750 ml) for $20 and small jars (375 ml) for $10. There is limited quantity, they recommend getting in touch with them as soon as possible to reserve your order. You can contact ASCCA by phone 403-931-1042 or email mailto:info@crossconservation.orgto arrange pickup as they cannot guarantee their office will be open when you arrive. Normal office hours are Monday to Friday from 8.30 am to 4.30 pm. The honey will also be available at the Halloween Howl, October 26.

Halloween Howl: Bring your family out for a wild scavenger hunt in the dark and see what goes on in nature at night. Bring a flashlight. Drop in between 6.30 pm and8.30 pm on October 26th, dressed in your Halloween costumes to start the scavenger hunt. Enjoy Halloween Tricks and Treats after, till 9 pm. Cost is $5/person and $20/family. You need to reserve. Phone 403-931-1042 or ASCCA website.

Vancouver Woman Left Behind on Trail by her Hiking Buddies

Vancouver’s North Shore Rescue manager, Allan McMordie, is criticizing a group of hikers that abandoned an injured woman on a hiking trail Sunday afternoon with no intention of calling for help. He has never seen a case where fellow hikers left someone behind and did not go for help.

When you go out for a hike (in a group or by yourself):

  • You need to be prepared for any type of emergency yourself:
    • have and wear all the proper gear for the hike
    • have emergency supplies:
      • e.g.: flashlight, matches, emergency heat blanket, first aid supplies, extra food and water, extra warm clothing, gloves, toque, hiking boots, poles.
    • Know where you are going, how difficult the terrain is, length of time it will take to complete, weather forecast for the day.
    • Know you hiking limitations.
    • Know the leader/coordinator of the hike you are going with.
    • When get to meetup, ask leader/coordinator, in case of an emergency what is the groups protocol.
    • Do Not accept people on the hike if they are not properly equipped and prepared for the hike.
    • Make sure everyone is accounted for at certain intervals on the hike.
    • Don’t leave anyone behind.
  • There are many other lessons to be learnt from this bad hiking experience.

For more in-depth coverage of this event, go to BC CTV news.

 Caribou on the Brink of Extinction in South Peace Region of BC

Caribou

Caribou is important part of Canadian heritage. We honor these great animals on the back of the Canadian quarter. Caribou used to roam the alpine tundra in thousands. All across Canada the caribou is in decline due to clear cut logging, mining and recreational use, changing climate and landscape. Widespread changes to their habitat, have meant the slow-moving animals cannot seek shelter up in the mountains from their main predator the wolf.

“If the BC government does not take drastic management action, the herds in the South Peace Region of BC could become extinct” states Scott McNay, BC Wildlife Info metric’s officer.

In 2013, the local herd called Kinse-Za had 16 caribou left. Two local First Nations and McNay built a 37-acre maternity pen to protect caribou mothers and their calves from predators. The maternity pen is a high black canvas fencing surrounding the area along with electrical wires to keep wolves and bears out. Inside the pen is open meadows, thick forest and has a constant food supply. Caretakers from the two local First Nations have a 24-hour watch over the animals. The mothers and calves will remain in the pen until the young are strong and fast enough to escape danger and survive on their own in the wild. In the last year, 13 calves were born in the pen and released in the wild in July.

The caribou herd has gone from 16 to currently 100. The maternity pen is only a start. McKay stated “Without the Caribou’s habitat being protected and there is no moratorium on industry in the area they will not survive.”

This year, the BC government had prepared a proposed recovery plan to save the caribou. It was a draft in partnership between the two local First Nation bands and the BC government. It would protect the caribou’s habitat by limiting industrial development of the area.

When the draft was announced, the public protested stating their livelihoods depend on the forestry and mining industries. Recreational enthusiasts are also against the proposal as they cannot ATV, camp, etc. in these areas. These groups were not consultant when the original proposal was drawn up.

The BC government hired Blair Lekstrom to come up with a new plan to save jobs and the caribou. But waiting for a balance means more caribou will die.

Cougar Killed after Two Attacks in the area of Ha Ling Peak

Per Alberta Environment and Parks, there were three reports of cougar sightings on October 2, 2019, all within a short period of time.

The first came from a woman who was walking her dog on a leash on the Ha Ling trail. She had headphones on and noticed her dog pulling on the leash. She turned and saw a cougar in close proximity. She used her bear spray which stopped the cougar from attacking. Cougar then left the scene. The dog was not seriously hurt. About an hour later, hikers were on an adjacent trail, had their dog off leash on the trail and did not have bear spray. The cougar attacked and took the dog. Soon after this attack the officers received a report on the same trail, who said they saw a cougar nearby. When officers investigated they found a cougar feeding on a small dog. The responding officers conferred with dispatch and decided to kill the cougar due to public safety concerns and the animal had been involved in attacks on two dogs in a short period of time.

This re-enforces the need to be prepared for surprise encounters with cougars and other wildlife that live in the mountain parks:

  • Carry bear spray and know how to use it.
  • Make plenty of noise.
  • Be aware of your surroundings, watch and listen for signs of cougars and other wildlife.
  • Keep pets on a leash.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

 

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by Gary Snider

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Alberta Governments wants public input on Bow River Reservoir Options:

Ever since the 2013 flooding, the provincial government has been trying to find ways to reduce future flood damage and improving drought storage on the Bow River.

The three options are:

A new SpringBank Dam and Glenbow Reservoir:

Glenbow Ranch

This would be located upstream of the Bearspaw dam, this infrastructure would be able to hold as much as 70 million cubic metres of water – more than four and half times the capacity of the Glenmore reservoir in Calgary. This would include construction of the Springbank  Dam.

Pro’s of this option is that it is far downstream in the Bow system. Which means it catches most of the runoff that feeds the Bow River before it passes Calgary. Since the main objective is to protect Calgary, then the closer the reservoir is to the city a better chance of stopping any major flooding.

Con’s of this option is a significant portion of Glenbow Provincial Ranch would be permanently impacted by a new reservoir. Alberta’s grasslands are not well protected, and this was a main point in establishing the park. The land was donated for conservation purposes, major archeological, historical and paleontology sites in the park could be at risk.

 

A New Morley Reservoir:

Upstream of the Ghost reservoir and located entirely within Stoney Nakoda reserve land.

Pro’s this could hold twice the water capacity size of the Glenbow proposal at roughly the same cost.

Con’s the proposed location of this reservoir is not as good from a downstream standpoint as the Glenbow, as it is higher up in the system. And the proposal is complicated due to land negotiations with the Stoney Nation. This proposal would not be quick and more expensive.

Expand Ghost Reservoir:

To expand the current capacity of the reservoir. There are two infrastructure changes, increase the height of the dam by 3 metres and install a low-level outlet to drain water out to create more storage capacity for incoming floodwaters.

Con’s, engineers are not sure what it would take to do one or both of these upgrades. The changes would only gain 35 million cubic metres of storage. This option would flood Stoney Nakoda reserve land and the Village of Ghost Lake may need to relocated. This will create long and complicated negotiations.

USP government is pushing the Springbank Dam and Glenbow Reservoir option forward, due to financial and time constraints. The federal government halted the UCP government from proceeding, as they needed to do a public inquiry into all three options prior to making a decision on which option to choose.

The Province of Alberta is putting on three open houses in the Cochrane/Calgary area to get public opinions on the Bow River Reservoir. The first open house was held in Cochrane on September 30, 2019. And was well attended.

The public expressed concern if the province chooses the Glenbow East over the other two options:

  • Some Cochrane homes could be underwater, if the province chooses the Glenbow East over the other two options.
  • How it could impact historic sites.
  • Owl Bay which has been used by Indigenous people for generations could be disturbed.
  • Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park – land that has been donated on the south side,  it was land that was held in stewardship, and it would now be flooded. This park was created to preserve native prairie and the history of the land. This would impact some of the trail systems at the ranch. The Trails would be under water.
  • There would be less conservation land for wildlife and less recreational opportunities.

 

The provincial government will be making a decision by the spring of 2020, on the public feedback, open houses with the assessments of all three proposals.

To get more information on the Springbank Dam and Glenbow Reservoir Proposal go to Alberta Springbank website.  This website has contact information for any public feedback regarding these three options for flood mitigation and drought control.

 

          Take Care and Have Fun

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