Newsletters

November 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

November 26, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

 

CORE’s 20th Anniversary Gala November 26, 2019

MARK YOUR CALENDARS – CORE is organizing “a big bash” to celebrate our 20th Anniversary.

It will take place at Scarboro Community Center (1727 – 14th Ave SW) , on Tuesday, November 26 from 6.30 pm to 10 pm. This is a ticket only event (RSVP was November 5, 2019).

Full Dinner. Slideshow. Trivia. Guest Storyteller. Cash Raffle.

Schedule of Events:

6.30pm – Arrival, drinks, snacks, welcome, slide show starts

7.00pm – Dinner seating and short History of CORE

7.15pm – Dinner buffet starts

7.45pm – Trivia contest

7.50pm – Toast

7.55pm – Celebration cake and coffee/tea

8.00pm – Entertainment starts during desert

9.00pm – Entertainment ends

9.10pm – Slide show continues, music and dance

10.00pm – Wrap up

For more details on the 20th gala event please click on this 20th anniversary Gala link.  Or go to the home page of CORE Website and click on 20th anniversary newsletter.

 A “memories” photo album has been setup on the CORE photos site (2019 – CORE20ANV) and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

Reminder: There is no Monthly CORE Meeting for December 2019

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

 Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 Course (AST 1):

CORE is organizing an AST 1 course (Avalanche Skills Training Level 1), on January 11 and 12, 2020. We highly encourage anyone playing in the backcountry to have this whether you are a skier, snowshoer or climber. You will learn to recognize avalanche terrain, understand safe travel, and be taught companion rescue. It will be taught by certified instructors (ACMG guides). Each participant will receive a certificate showing they have completed the course.  There will be one day of classroom instruction and then a full day in the field. You can be on skis or snowshoes. The use of transceivers, probes and shovels will be taught. If you do not own a transceiver, probe, and rescue shovel, you will need to tell Mike – there is no extra cost for this equipment – it is included in the course cost . We need  exactly  8 people to get the best price where each person would pay $100 dollars, with the CORE’s Peterman fund paying the other half to meet the full standard AST 1 cost of $200 dollars per person. Last date for signup is December 28, 2019.

You will need to register for the course by email to mailbox@corehike.org, And state in the email subject line, AST 1 course forward email to Mike. Mike is organizing the AST 1 event. And by sending a cheque to CORE with a letter stating what the payment is for (See the About page for CORE’s mailing address). All payments are due before December 28, 2019. The classroom part of the course will be held at a meeting room at MEC in Calgary on January 11. The field day (January 12) will be held at Bow Summit – car pooling arrangements will be made on January 11 at MEC.

Event Coordinators  2019/2020 Winter Planning Meeting

The 2019/2020 Winter Planning Meeting will be held on December 3, 2019. The meeting will be held at Mike’s place. More information will be coming soon thru CORE event calendar.

Car Pooling

When car pooling, if the road has been very dusty, slushy or muddy, you should help your driver out by giving an extra loonie ($1.00) or toonie ($2.00) for a vehicle wash. Your driver will appreciate this gesture.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

Trip Reports

Please remember that the best and fastest way to send your Trip Reports to the  Executive Trip Coordinator,  is to attach the report as a pdf or a scanned photo to an email  to mailbox@corehike.org   if this is not possible, then you can bring the hard copy to one of the monthly meetings. Electronic or hard copy the trip reports must be given in as soon as possible after the event.

Event Calendar

Information on the title part (front page) of the calendar event should have the kind of event, the name of the event, the area, the kilometers, the elevation and the difficulty rating of the event – NOTHING ELSE. All the rest of the information should be in the description of the event.

e.g. Snowshoe, Hare Loop, West Bragg Creek, 7 kms, 100m, E.

Please refer to the Guides tab on the CORE website for information on Guidelines, Difficulty Ratings, etc..

Safety

Please ensure that you have with you, your membership card (with your emergency contact information) visible on your backpack, as well as your own first aid kit. Refer to the Guides tab on the CORE Website under Clothing and Equipment to make sure you have the appropriate clothing/footwear and equipment for the particular event, as well as food and plenty of water. Remember that event coordinators may refuse anyone not adequately equipped to participate in that event (hike, scramble, snowshoe, x-country ski, bicycle, etc.).

Members, you need to be aware of your own capabilities and limitations, in relation to how difficult the event is. You can check the Guidelines, Difficult Ratings for reference.

 

 

Gloves found

Lost and Found

Found a pair of Gloves from last spring. You will need to identify the gloves. If you believe these gloves are yours, email to mailto:mailbox@corehike.org , with details of the missing gloves.

 

 

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October to November  2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for October 16 to November 15, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

October 20 Sundance Canyon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

October 26 Dance Night Triwood Community

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

October 31 Halloween Night Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

November 2 Seasons of Bowness Park Lunch and Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.……………………………………………………………………………………………… 

November 9 Nose Hill Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

News and Notes

LG Versant Snowshoes

The Norseman Outdoor Specialist Offering Discount on LG Versant Snowshoes

The Norseman shop is offering a discount special on LG Versant Snowshoes with Leki Corklite poles and LG snowshoe bag – $450 value for $329, when purchased as a set. For more information call Norseman Outdoor Specialist at 403 – 249 – 5451,  4655 – 37th Street SW.

 

 

 

Know the Snow Event being held by MEC

MEC is hosting free talks on winter safety, gear and pro tips for all that is winter.  For more information I have attached links to both stores.

MEC downtown, is hosting these seminars on November 23 and 24: On November 23 they are hosting 5 different winter topics, from snowshoeing to winter camping, including Ice Climbing Safety presented by the Alpine Club of Canada. On November 24th, there are 4 winter topics, including the MT Harvey case study (on how an avalanche was triggered by climbers) presented by Avalanche Canada.

MEC south, is hosting one day of seminars on November 23: they will have 5 winter topics from x-country skiing to a presentation by Avalanche Canada, they will be showing you on how to used the online tools and resources on the Avalanche Canada website.

WBC XC Ski Trails Fall 2019

West Bragg Creek XC Ski Trails Groomed And Ready to Go

With the recent snowfall on November 6th, 9th and 10th, the Greater Bragg Creek Trail Association ski groomers have started winter trail grooming. All cross country skiers can use the groomed trails. All non-skiers are requested not to use the groomed WBC ski trails until April 1, 2020. Even thou all users can use the ski trails until December 1, 2019, WBC are asking people to respect the groomers hard work and only use the ski trails for cross country skiing.

 

 

 

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

November 21, 2019 , 7 pm to 8 pm, at Fish Creek Learning Center Shannon Terrance, Fish Creek Park – Exploring the Ice Age across Alberta

Presenter is Dr. Chris Jass – Curator of Quaternary Palaeontology of the Royal Alberta Museum. Exploring the ice age fossil record found in caves, gravel pits, lakes and river drainages across Alberta. Fossil remains recovered from these field projects reveal hints of the landscapes occupied by both extinct and living animals highlighting the ancient and modern biota. Dr. Jass will take you to different palaeontolgy sites across the province and highlight what that sites tell us about the Ice Age history of Alberta and to discuss how that information is relevant today. Cost for this event is $10.00. For more information and how to register for this event go to Friends of  Fish Creek Park event calendar.

November 23, 2019, 1 pm to 4 pm, Hull’s Wood Day Use, Fish Creek ParkFish Creek Family Day Nature Day free event – you need to register go to Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar.

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Rolling Grasslands Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park

Glenbow Ranch December 3, 2019 – Giving Tuesday

“Be part of the #GivingTuesday movement on December 3rd and help Glenbow Ranch Park Foundation fight invasive species, prevent soil erosion and maintain trails. For a little as $25, you can support one hour of vegetation management at Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park.” Glenbow Ranch survives on donations by the public and organizations.

What is giving Tuesday, “It is the Opening day of the giving season”, it is time when charities, companies and individuals join together and rally for a favourite cause. It was started in Canada by a group of organizations including GIV3, canadahelps.org, and now includes over 6,500 partners.

On how to donate to Glenbow Ranch and other activities and trail reports go to Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park.

Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area, New Parking Fee Effective January 1, 2020

ASCC is a not-for-profit charity in Alberta. They have estimated the cost of providing an opportunity for visitors to experience over 20 km of observation trails to be approximately $50, 000 per year or $5 per visitor to maintain the trails and facilities. Visitor donations do not cover these costs and the government only covers less than 1% of their operation budget.

Starting January 1, 2020, visitors will be required to pay a fee of $10.00 per vehicle seven days per week, from 4 am to 11 pm. Their parking lot will be regularly patrolled by volunteers and staff and is monitored 24/7 by security cameras. ASCC is implementing a parking pass system. If you purchase your pass now until December 15, 2019, you will be able to access an early-bird price of $100 for the year. The regular price after December 15 for an annual pass will be $120 for the calendar year. If you are a frequent visitor to the park purchase your pass early.

For more information go to ASCC.

Bears get into car

Port Moody, B.C. Police find a bear locked in a Car

Police were called to a home in Port Moody, B.C. for a report of a theft from a vehicle in progress. “On arrival, police knew they were not going to arrest a human, but rather help a black bear that was trying to get out of the homeowner’s car.”

The bear gained entry to the vehicle by pulling on the door handle (vehicle was not locked), when the bear was rummaging thru the vehicle looking for food, the bear must of hit the door lock. Members of the BC Conservation Office were called out to assist and eventually open the door to let the bear out.

Bears have a keen sense of smell and keeping open food in vehicles can entice bears to break in and scavenger for food.

Keep your vehicle locked, you don’t know who the thief could be!!!!

Whirling Disease Cycle

Johnson Lake in Banff National Park, Being Drained Due to Whirling Disease

Parks Canada has taken a major step to stop whirling disease, by partially draining Johnson Lake. They are lowering the reservoir water levels in an effort to eliminate the parasite and save endangered trout in the area. Crews have removed most of the fish from the lake and are lowering the water level as the final step.

Johnson Lake is currently closed to the public and will remain off limits until May of 2020, while work is being done. Bill Hunt, Banff’s resource conservation manager, stated “It is very important that the disease does not move from this water body into adjacent water bodies.” Johnson Lake sits close to two other water bodies that tie into habitat for salmonid, like cutthroat trout. The Westslope Cutthroat Trout is a threatened species in Canada, and the purest strain of this trout are only found in Banff National Park.

Salmonid is a family of elongate bony fishes that have the three vertebrae upturned. This includes salmon, trout, char, freshwater whitefish and graylings.

The name whirling disease comes from the erratic swimming patterns of infected fish. It is an invasive microscopic parasite that requires a salmonid and aquatic-worm as hosts. It is completely safe for humans and animals. But it does affect members of the salmonid family, like trout(affects several trout species including cutthroat and bull troat, both are threatened species), whitefish and char.

Per Jon Mee, professor of biology at Mount Royal University, “rainbow and cutthroat trout can have up to 90 per cent mortality at the juvenile stage if they are infected.”

You can help in the fight to stop the spread of whirling disease by cleaning, drain and dry all your boats, fishing gear, water gear(including PDF’s), as you leave a water body.

Pyramid Mountain Jasper, Red shows Pine Beetle destruction

Alberta Budget adds $5 Million to Fight Mountain Pine Beetle

October 31, 2019 Forestry Minister Devin Dreeshen stated “the fight on Mountain Pine Beetle is being increased from $25 million to $30 million.” The money will be spent on monitoring beetle infestations as well as on early attack programs. The program is regional right now. The western part of the province is severely infected. Go to Jasper and see the massive dead red standing trees. There is $11 billion of forest that is susceptible to this disease and the province needs to get in front of this problem.

Paul Whittaker of the Alberta Forest Products Association stated “that the Hinton area continues to be the most threatened as the beetles are migrating from Jasper National Park. The major problem of not fighting the beetle is the huge fire risk associated with the increase in dead pine trees. Last years cold winter helped slow down the beetle migration, as it killed 90% of the new larvae.

The government of Saskatchewan is sending money to the government of Alberta to help in the fight against the beetle. They understand if the beetle is not stopped in Alberta it will invade Saskatchewan.

The Federal government has invested $11.7 million in beetle related research in Alberta. And has five full time researchers in the province of Alberta including one in Jasper National Park and assist the province of Alberta in scientific monitoring and research, including a risk assessment of the threat of Mountain Pine Beetle to Canada’s boreal and eastern pine forests. The report was released in June 2019. The Federal Government has not financed any monies to help fight the mountain pine beetle.

No beetles have advanced past Lac la Biche.

Jasper has 93,000 hectarces of forest covered in mountain pine beetle. Half of the pine trees in Jasper Park. Risk of fire is great in the Jasper area. The National Park service will be setting some prescribed burns, around the town and major attractions. But they cannot burn all the areas the beetle has destroyed.

Editors opinion: if the Federal government had taken an active role (not just research and monitoring) in trying to prevent the mountain pine beetle from spreading, Jasper National Park forests may not be in the condition it is today. Years prior, the federal government needed to do a constant survey of the forests, by drone, to determine if there was any mountain pine beetle damage, then go in and log/burn the area to destroy the pine beetle. This would have slowed the pine beetle progression from spreading. Instead the federal government took an hands off approach to the problem.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Dr. Seuss hiking quote

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Jackrabbit Cross Country Skiing Programs In Canada

Jackrabbit Johannsen

Jackrabbit cross country skiing programs was named after Herman “Jackrabbit” Smith Johannsen (1875 to 1987). He pioneered cross country skiing in Canada and the “Jackrabbit” children’s ski programs are named after him.

You must feel the tug of your muscles as you near the top of a long grade, and know the joy of making your own track down an unbroken expanse of powder snow. This is skiing. This is adventure!

Jackrabbit Johannsen, circa 1946.

Often when I have been out with “younger” skiers, or those who have not experienced the trails in Ontario and Quebec, I find they think that childrens’ Jack Rabbit ski programs have something to do with bunnies hopping through the woods. In fact cross country skiing in Canada and the US was pioneered by Jackrabbit Johannsen, who spent many years in the Laurentians carving out trails and popularizing the sport. You can find this statue of “Jackrabbit” in the Sports Hall of Fame at COP, right here in Calgary. Check out this slightly dated NFB film (https://www.nfb.ca/film/jack_rabbit/) featuring Jackrabbit and the Canadian Ski Marathon.

In 1972, Jackrabbit Johannsen was awarded the Order of Canada. In the 1970s, he was a patron of the Canadian Ski Marathon and became involved in the Jackrabbit Ski League, a national ski program named in his honour and responsible for training thousands of young skiers. In 1982, at the age of 107, he was inducted into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.

Here is a YouTube video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S93NT78CroM&t=2s) where he is interviewed (en francais) by a reporter from Radio Canada. At one point he says (my translation): “Canada in February and March is much better than Florida.” Wouldn’t you agree?

You can find the complete story of his life and accomplishments at this link.(http://laurentian.quebecheritageweb.com/article/herman-jackrabbit-smith-johannsen-1875-1987

 

 Alberta and Canada at Risk Species:

October’s presentation was on “Alberta’s grizzly population is an endangered species.” Pamela brought in John from the Alberta Environment and Parks to speak about the grizzly population and how the province of Alberta is monitoring and increasing the grizzly population in Alberta. This was a very informative presentation. I was not even aware that the grizzly bear is an endangered species in Alberta. This started me thinking how many other endangered species there is in Alberta and Canada. And is there any crossover between the provinces. And what are the provincial and federal governments doing to stop our endangered species from becoming extinct.

Alberta at Risk Species:

Based on 2015 records from Alberta Environment and Parks, there is 132 species of amphibians, birds, fish, mammals and reptiles, ranging from Sensitive to Endangered in the province of Alberta. This does not include species that are extinct.

Per the Alberta Wildlife Act the following are a few of the species at risk:

  • Bald Eagle – Sensitive
  • Ferruginous Hawk – At Risk – Designated as Threatened
  • Peregrine Falcon – At Risk – Designated as Threatened
  • Burrowing Owl – At Risk – Designated as Threatened
  • Grizzly Bear – At Risk – Designated as Endangered
  • Canada Lynx – Sensitive
  • Bobcat – Sensitive
  • Swift Fox – At Risk – Designated as Endangered
  • Wood Bison  – At Risk – Designated as Endangered (has made a slight comeback)
  • Bull Trout – At Risk – Designated as Endangered
  • Woodland Caribou – At Risk – Designated as Endangered

Canada at Risk Species:

As of 2017 there are 521 plant and animal species that are considered at risk under the Canada Species at Risk Act.

A few of the Species that are classified as endangered are:

  • Grizzly Bear
  • Atlantic Cod
  • Spotted Owl
  • Beluga Whale
  • Woodland Caribou
  • Snapping Turtles
  • Monarch Butterflies

Grizzly Bear

There are many endangered species that are common between the provinces, territories and the federal government.

What are the Provinces, Territories and Federal government’s doing to protect our wildlife?

The provinces and territories have their own species at risk legislation and the federal government has the federal species at risk act. These acts are to prevent wildlife species from becoming extinct and implementing the measures for their recovery. It gives legal protection to wildlife and their habitat in order for them to survive.

The provincial, territories and federal government’s have spent millions of dollars for studies on why the species has become endangered, and what needs to be done to help the species to survive. All three level of governments have failed to protect the critical habitat, which means that the species don’t have the chance to recover, from the decline in populations.

A good part of the reason some of these species are endangered, is due to industry, recreation and human expansion into the habitats of these endangered species. The governments recognize that to help endangered species that they need to protect their habitat. They also, recognized that if they took away this habitat from industry, recreation and human expansion, economically an area may not survive.

All levels of government need to draw a balance between industry, recreation and the habitat for the wildlife, for these species to return to sustainable levels. All levels of government need to be held responsible for these endangered species!

 

          Take Care and Have Fun

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on November 2019 CORE Newsletter

October 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

October 29, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for October’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

October Presentation by Alberta Environment and Parks: Grizzly Bear Management

 

Join John Paczkowski, Park Ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, will give a presentation on grizzly bears in the Kananaskis Region and beyond.  John will first present on the latest grizzly bear population census work for grizzly bear management area 5, which includes Kananaskis Country down to the Crowsnest Pass. There will then be a discussion about the aversive conditioning program in Kananaskis country. For almost 20 years the program is aimed to reduced bear-human incidents by monitoring and conditioning grizzly bears in the region.

Alberta Environment and Parks “supports environmental conservation and protection, sustainable economic prosperity, quality of life and outdoor recreation opportunities.”

In Alberta, Grizzly Bears are designated as an “AT Risk SPECIES.”  The province has instituted a Grizzly Bear Recovery Plan.

Reminder: There is no Monthly CORE Meeting for December 2019

UPCOMING EVENTS:

 

CORE’s 20th Anniversary Gala November 26, 2019

MARK YOUR CALENDARS – CORE is organizing “a big bash” to celebrate our 20th Anniversary.

It will take place at Scarboro Community Center (1727 – 14th Ave SW) , on Tuesday, November 26 from 6.30 pm to 10 pm

There will be a sumptuous sit down dinner, professional entertainment, quizzes, prizes, cash raffle and a slide show of events over the past 20 years. This promises to be the biggest event ever held by CORE.

Cost for Members: $ 20.00                              Non-members: $ 35.00

You need to RSVP by November 5th.

To attend this event, please go to the CORE Home page, click on Activities and Choose 20ANV Gala Registration.

For more details on schedule of events, how to register for this great event, please click on this 20th anniversary Gala link.  Or go to the home page of CORE Website and click on 20th anniversary newsletter.

 A “memories” photo album has been setup on the CORE photos site (2019 – CORE20ANV) and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

 

2019  Avalanche Awareness Events at U of C

Avalanche Canada holds Avalanche Awareness Presentation at U of C, November 7, 2019:

Avalanche Canada is having an avalanche awareness event in Calgary, November 7, at the University of Calgary. This is a great opportunity to refresh your knowledge of avalanche risks prior to getting into the mountains this winter. Especially targeting snowshoer’s/cross-country skiers or people who like being in the winter backcountry, but do not have much/any avalanche experience.

The Avalanche Awareness Event is being held at University of Calgary, November 7, 2019, Doors open at 6.30 pm,  Presentation starts at 7.00 pm. Science Theatres #148. Use the U of C room finder.   Admission is Free. 

If you want to park at the University, use Lot 21 outside the Math/Sciences building. Group Meetup and a short walk: You can park at the far EAST end of the Brentwood Park and Ride, right where 31st Street enters the LRT parking lot (Google 32 Ave and 31 Street NW). Meetup at 6.15pm. It is a 15 minute walk over to the University. See CORE calendar for more information.

 

Avalanche Skills Training Level 1 Course (AST 1):

CORE is organizing an AST 1 course (Avalanche Skills Training Level 1), on January 11 and 12, 2020. We highly encourage anyone playing in the backcountry to have this whether you are a skier, snowshoer or climber. You will learn to recognize avalanche terrain, understand safe travel, and be taught companion rescue. It will be taught by certified instructors (ACMG guides). Each participant will receive a certificate showing they have completed the course.  There will be one day of classroom instruction and then a full day in the field. You can be on skis or snowshoes. The use of transceivers, probes and shovels will be taught. If you do not own a transceiver, probe, and rescue shovel, you will need to either purchase or rent the equipment for the course(ask Mike where). We need a minimum of 8 people to get the best price where each person would pay $100 dollars, with the CORE’s Peterman fund paying the other half to meet the full standard AST 1 cost of $200 dollars per person. Last date for signup is December 28, 2019.

You will need to register for the course by email to mailbox@corehike.org, And state in the email subject line, AST 1 course forward email to Mike. Mike is organizing the AST 1 event. And by sending a cheque to CORE with a letter stating what the payment is for (See the About page for CORE’s mailing address).

Event Coordinators Guidelines

A reminder to all event coordinators that a Trip Report Form is a requirement for all official CORE events (4+ people including coordinator). This includes hikes, bike trips, snowshoe and ski trips, guided backcountry trips and workshops and training courses that are sponsored by CORE.

New:  Event coordinators may now submit Trip Reports for unofficial (<4 people) events, and social events so they are acknowledged for the event in the database.

All Trip Reports should be provided to the Executive Trip Coordinator   in electronic or in hard copy form. For electronic submission, scanned PDF, or photo of the trip report emailed to mailbox@corehike.org as soon as possible after the event is fine. Event Coordinators Guidelines are posted on the CORE website at corehike.org.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September and October 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September 21, 2019 to October 15, 2019Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

September 14 – Memorial Hike and Picnic

History of CORE’s Annual Memorial Hike:

In 2010, after the passing of the 3rd CORE member, it was decided to have an Annual Memorial Hike in their honor. The first hike was Powderface Ridge summit on September 18, 2010. A Memorial Hike has been held each year around September to honor the, now 5 CORE members who have sadly passed away.

In Memoriam:

Will Farrington – 2007

Branko Peterman – 2009

Deb Side – 2010

Gary Bernhard – 2013

Allan Side – 2016

The 2019 Memorial Hike was well attended. 26 members took part in the hike and 28 members attended the potluck.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

September 14 Memorial Hike and Picnic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

September 14 Memorial Picnic

 

 

 

September 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

September 14

 

 

 

September 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

September 21 Eagle Hill Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.……………………………………………………………………………………………… 

September 21 Pocterra Ridge Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

September 22 Commonwealth Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

October 6 Cochrane Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Below are some recipes from the Memorial Picnic:

Cranberry-Bran Muffins:

Prep Time 15 minutes, Total Time 35, 12 servings, 1 muffing (82 g) each:

What you Need:

-2 Cups whole wheat flour                                   -1.5 cups wheat bran

-4 tsp Magic Baking Powder                                -1 tsp ground nutmeg

-1 tsp ground cinnamon                                        -1 tsp ground nutmeg

-1/2 tsp baking soda                                               -1/2 tsp salt

-1 egg                                                                          -1  1/4 cups milk

-1/3 cup canola oil                                                   -1/3 cup molasses

-1/3 cup packed brown sugar                                -1 cup frozen cranberries

If your molasses is a bit thick, warm it in the microwave for a few seconds so it is fluid enough to mix with other ingredients.

Make It

Heat Oven to 400 degrees F.

Combine first 7 ingredients in large bowl. Whisk egg, milk, oil and molasses in medium bowl until blended. Stir in sugar. Add to flour mixture, stir just until blended. Stir in cranberries. Spoon into 12 muffin pan cups sprayed with cooking spray. Bake 20 minutes or until toothpick inserted in centers comes out clean. Cool muffins in pan for 5 minutes. Remove to wire rack, cool completely.

Lemon Drizzle Loaf:    (Yes a hint of England)

Makes: one 10 in. by 4 in. (25 cm by 10 cm) loaf cake, which cuts into 8 slices

For the Sponge:

-1 cup plus 3 tbsp. (295 ml) unsalted butter, softened, plus more for greasing the pan.

-1 & 1/3 cups (330 ml) sugar                           -3 eggs

-Zest of 3 or 4 lemons (save the juice for the lemon drizzle and icing)

-1 & 3/4 cups plus 2 tbsp. (460 ml) baking powder                -1/4 (1 ml) salt

-6 & 1/2 tbsp. (97.5 ml) milk

The Lemon Drizzle:

-1 tbsp. (15 ml) sugar           -1 tbsp. (15 ml) water            – 2 tbsp. (30 ml) fresh lemon juice

The Icing:

-1 & 3/4 cups (430 ml) confectioners sugar            -2 tbsp. (30 ml) lemon juice

1. Preheat oven to 355 F (180 C: 325 F or 160 C convection)

  1. Butter a 10-in.-by-4-in. (25-cm-by-10-cm) loaf pan and line the base and sides with parchment paper, extending the paper about 2 in. (5 cm) above the top of the pan.
  2. First, make the sponge. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream the butter and sugar well, though you don’t want as fluffy a mixture as you would for a layer cake. Zest the lemons into the butter mixture and mix thoroughly. Beat in the eggs one at a time, making sure each one is thoroughly mixed in before adding the next.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Mix half of this into the creamed butter mixture, scraping down the sides, until barely combined.
  4. While the mixer is still going, beat in all the milk. Then add the remaining flour and mix until just combined. Scrape the bowl and give it one last mix.
  5. Scoop the mixture into the prepared pan and smooth the top with an icing spatula or rubber spatula.
  6. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until the top of the cake is springy and an inserted skewer comes out clean.
  7. To make the lemon drizzle, combine the sugar, water and lemon juice in a small pan and heat just until the sugar is melted. Do not let this boil, or the fresh flavour will be lost.
  8. Use a skewer to poke holes evenly throughout the baked loaf. Pour the lemon drizzle over the loaf and let it soak in while you make the icing.
  9. In a small bowl, whisk together the confectioners’ sugar and lemon juice until smooth.
  10. To remove the loaf cake from the pan, run a small paring knife along the inside of the pan, then tilt the pan on its side and coax the loaf out, using the parchment paper as a handle. Peel off the paper and turn the loaf upright on your cooling rack or worktop.
  11. Drizzle the icing over the loaf and let it drip down the sides. Use a spatula to lift the loaf onto a serving dish. This keeps well for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

African Peanut Stew:

Ingredients:

-Chickpeas, drained and rinsed 1 – 15 oz. can    -Vegetable or Chicken stock 4 cups

-Sea Salt or Regular Salt 1/4 tsp                           -Fresh Ground Pepper to taste

-Cumin 1 tsp                                                              -Cayenne 1/4 tsp

-Tomatoes Diced (including juice)                        -Spanish onion, small diced 1

-Sweet Potatoes, cut into 1/2 inch cubes roughly 2 medium sweet potatoes 4 – 5 cups

-All Natural Peanut Butter (Creamy) 1/2 cup       -Garlic, minced 4 cloves

-Fresh Ginger, minced 1 inch                                   -Margi 10 drops

Method:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a 6 quart slow cooker.
  2. Mix well
  3. Cook on low for 6 to 8 hours
  4. Serve warm directly from the slow cooker with Nan bread.

To make the recipe Vegan use vegetable Stock.

Serves 8

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

News and Notes

The Norseman Outdoor Specialist October Ski Waxing Special:

CORE October Special: Every second pair of similar XC skis(e.g. waxable vs wax-less) can be serviced at half price provided that they are brought in to The Norseman for service at the same time.

CORE members with XC Skis: For the month of October the Norseman Outdoor Specialist is offering a half price special on for waxing every second pair of skis. So, if you want to get together with another CORE member or other friends and bring in 2 pairs of skis for waxing, you can share the cost. (36 + 18)/2 = $27 for waxable skis, (22+11)/2 = $16.50 for wax-less. Both skis have to be the same type.

Option 1:  Waxable Skis $36 Grip Pocket Preparation: 1. Clean off old wax, etc.,  2. Locate and mark the correct grip pocket,  3. Sand bases smooth as required,  4. Wax grip pocket with base binder wax,  5. Wax tips and tails with glide wax.

Option 2:  Wax-less Skis $22 Clean and Hot Wax , 1. Clean off old wax, etc.,  2. Sand bases smooth as required,  3. Hot wax entire ski with glide wax.

If you have and questions you can call Peter Minions or Anthony Mauriks at the Norseman, 403 – 249 – 5451. Address 4655 – 37th Street SW.

2019 Calgary New and Used Ski Show:

2019 Calgary New and Used Ski Sale

New and used Ski Sale and Show at Max Bell Centre, from October 25 to 27, 2019.

You need to pre-register your items for sale, bring the registration form along with your items to the Equipment Drop-off on Wednesday or Thursday (October 23 and 24,2019). For more information go to 2019 Calgary New and Used Ski Sale.

 

Ann and Sandy Cross Conservation Area Events:

ASCCA Honey for Sale: ASCCA honey is made by their own bees. The honey is unpasteurized and all-natural. Proceeds will help ASCCCA continue to care for their bees and will support conservation and education programs.They will be selling honey in large jars (750 ml) for $20 and small jars (375 ml) for $10. There is limited quantity, they recommend getting in touch with them as soon as possible to reserve your order. You can contact ASCCA by phone 403-931-1042 or email mailto:info@crossconservation.orgto arrange pickup as they cannot guarantee their office will be open when you arrive. Normal office hours are Monday to Friday from 8.30 am to 4.30 pm. The honey will also be available at the Halloween Howl, October 26.

Halloween Howl: Bring your family out for a wild scavenger hunt in the dark and see what goes on in nature at night. Bring a flashlight. Drop in between 6.30 pm and8.30 pm on October 26th, dressed in your Halloween costumes to start the scavenger hunt. Enjoy Halloween Tricks and Treats after, till 9 pm. Cost is $5/person and $20/family. You need to reserve. Phone 403-931-1042 or ASCCA website.

Vancouver Woman Left Behind on Trail by her Hiking Buddies

Vancouver’s North Shore Rescue manager, Allan McMordie, is criticizing a group of hikers that abandoned an injured woman on a hiking trail Sunday afternoon with no intention of calling for help. He has never seen a case where fellow hikers left someone behind and did not go for help.

When you go out for a hike (in a group or by yourself):

  • You need to be prepared for any type of emergency yourself:
    • have and wear all the proper gear for the hike
    • have emergency supplies:
      • e.g.: flashlight, matches, emergency heat blanket, first aid supplies, extra food and water, extra warm clothing, gloves, toque, hiking boots, poles.
    • Know where you are going, how difficult the terrain is, length of time it will take to complete, weather forecast for the day.
    • Know you hiking limitations.
    • Know the leader/coordinator of the hike you are going with.
    • When get to meetup, ask leader/coordinator, in case of an emergency what is the groups protocol.
    • Do Not accept people on the hike if they are not properly equipped and prepared for the hike.
    • Make sure everyone is accounted for at certain intervals on the hike.
    • Don’t leave anyone behind.
  • There are many other lessons to be learnt from this bad hiking experience.

For more in-depth coverage of this event, go to BC CTV news.

 Caribou on the Brink of Extinction in South Peace Region of BC

Caribou

Caribou is important part of Canadian heritage. We honor these great animals on the back of the Canadian quarter. Caribou used to roam the alpine tundra in thousands. All across Canada the caribou is in decline due to clear cut logging, mining and recreational use, changing climate and landscape. Widespread changes to their habitat, have meant the slow-moving animals cannot seek shelter up in the mountains from their main predator the wolf.

“If the BC government does not take drastic management action, the herds in the South Peace Region of BC could become extinct” states Scott McNay, BC Wildlife Info metric’s officer.

In 2013, the local herd called Kinse-Za had 16 caribou left. Two local First Nations and McNay built a 37-acre maternity pen to protect caribou mothers and their calves from predators. The maternity pen is a high black canvas fencing surrounding the area along with electrical wires to keep wolves and bears out. Inside the pen is open meadows, thick forest and has a constant food supply. Caretakers from the two local First Nations have a 24-hour watch over the animals. The mothers and calves will remain in the pen until the young are strong and fast enough to escape danger and survive on their own in the wild. In the last year, 13 calves were born in the pen and released in the wild in July.

The caribou herd has gone from 16 to currently 100. The maternity pen is only a start. McKay stated “Without the Caribou’s habitat being protected and there is no moratorium on industry in the area they will not survive.”

This year, the BC government had prepared a proposed recovery plan to save the caribou. It was a draft in partnership between the two local First Nation bands and the BC government. It would protect the caribou’s habitat by limiting industrial development of the area.

When the draft was announced, the public protested stating their livelihoods depend on the forestry and mining industries. Recreational enthusiasts are also against the proposal as they cannot ATV, camp, etc. in these areas. These groups were not consultant when the original proposal was drawn up.

The BC government hired Blair Lekstrom to come up with a new plan to save jobs and the caribou. But waiting for a balance means more caribou will die.

Cougar Killed after Two Attacks in the area of Ha Ling Peak

Per Alberta Environment and Parks, there were three reports of cougar sightings on October 2, 2019, all within a short period of time.

The first came from a woman who was walking her dog on a leash on the Ha Ling trail. She had headphones on and noticed her dog pulling on the leash. She turned and saw a cougar in close proximity. She used her bear spray which stopped the cougar from attacking. Cougar then left the scene. The dog was not seriously hurt. About an hour later, hikers were on an adjacent trail, had their dog off leash on the trail and did not have bear spray. The cougar attacked and took the dog. Soon after this attack the officers received a report on the same trail, who said they saw a cougar nearby. When officers investigated they found a cougar feeding on a small dog. The responding officers conferred with dispatch and decided to kill the cougar due to public safety concerns and the animal had been involved in attacks on two dogs in a short period of time.

This re-enforces the need to be prepared for surprise encounters with cougars and other wildlife that live in the mountain parks:

  • Carry bear spray and know how to use it.
  • Make plenty of noise.
  • Be aware of your surroundings, watch and listen for signs of cougars and other wildlife.
  • Keep pets on a leash.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

 

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by Gary Snider

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Alberta Governments wants public input on Bow River Reservoir Options:

Ever since the 2013 flooding, the provincial government has been trying to find ways to reduce future flood damage and improving drought storage on the Bow River.

The three options are:

A new SpringBank Dam and Glenbow Reservoir:

Glenbow Ranch

This would be located upstream of the Bearspaw dam, this infrastructure would be able to hold as much as 70 million cubic metres of water – more than four and half times the capacity of the Glenmore reservoir in Calgary. This would include construction of the Springbank  Dam.

Pro’s of this option is that it is far downstream in the Bow system. Which means it catches most of the runoff that feeds the Bow River before it passes Calgary. Since the main objective is to protect Calgary, then the closer the reservoir is to the city a better chance of stopping any major flooding.

Con’s of this option is a significant portion of Glenbow Provincial Ranch would be permanently impacted by a new reservoir. Alberta’s grasslands are not well protected, and this was a main point in establishing the park. The land was donated for conservation purposes, major archeological, historical and paleontology sites in the park could be at risk.

 

A New Morley Reservoir:

Upstream of the Ghost reservoir and located entirely within Stoney Nakoda reserve land.

Pro’s this could hold twice the water capacity size of the Glenbow proposal at roughly the same cost.

Con’s the proposed location of this reservoir is not as good from a downstream standpoint as the Glenbow, as it is higher up in the system. And the proposal is complicated due to land negotiations with the Stoney Nation. This proposal would not be quick and more expensive.

Expand Ghost Reservoir:

To expand the current capacity of the reservoir. There are two infrastructure changes, increase the height of the dam by 3 metres and install a low-level outlet to drain water out to create more storage capacity for incoming floodwaters.

Con’s, engineers are not sure what it would take to do one or both of these upgrades. The changes would only gain 35 million cubic metres of storage. This option would flood Stoney Nakoda reserve land and the Village of Ghost Lake may need to relocated. This will create long and complicated negotiations.

USP government is pushing the Springbank Dam and Glenbow Reservoir option forward, due to financial and time constraints. The federal government halted the UCP government from proceeding, as they needed to do a public inquiry into all three options prior to making a decision on which option to choose.

The Province of Alberta is putting on three open houses in the Cochrane/Calgary area to get public opinions on the Bow River Reservoir. The first open house was held in Cochrane on September 30, 2019. And was well attended.

The public expressed concern if the province chooses the Glenbow East over the other two options:

  • Some Cochrane homes could be underwater, if the province chooses the Glenbow East over the other two options.
  • How it could impact historic sites.
  • Owl Bay which has been used by Indigenous people for generations could be disturbed.
  • Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park – land that has been donated on the south side,  it was land that was held in stewardship, and it would now be flooded. This park was created to preserve native prairie and the history of the land. This would impact some of the trail systems at the ranch. The Trails would be under water.
  • There would be less conservation land for wildlife and less recreational opportunities.

 

The provincial government will be making a decision by the spring of 2020, on the public feedback, open houses with the assessments of all three proposals.

To get more information on the Springbank Dam and Glenbow Reservoir Proposal go to Alberta Springbank website.  This website has contact information for any public feedback regarding these three options for flood mitigation and drought control.

 

          Take Care and Have Fun

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on October 2019 CORE Newsletter

CORE 20th Anniversary Gala 26 Nov, 2019

This very special event will take place at Scarboro Community Centre on Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Time:  6.30 – 10.00 pm

Members Cost: $20    Non-members/Guests:  $35
Note: This event will be subsidized by CORE.

This will be an elegant evening with drinks (wine/beer/soft drinks), snacks/appys, a sit-down dinner (see below), desert (cake), tea, coffee, professional entertainment (storyteller/musician), door prizes, trivia contest prizes, slide show from CORE’s 20 years, music and dancing.
In addition to the above, there will also be a big raffle, so bring some cash for a chance to win the lot!

Schedule of Events:

6.30pm – Arrival, drinks, snacks, welcome, slide show starts

7.00pm – Dinner seating and short History of CORE

7.15pm – Dinner buffet starts

7.45pm – Trivia contest

7.50 – Toast

7.55pm – Celebration cake and coffee/tea

8.00pm – Entertainment starts during desert

9.00pm – Entertainment ends

9.10pm – Slide show continues, music and dance

10.00pm – Wrap up

 

Dinner will be served buffet style
Choice of :
*  Roasted AAA Beef Marinated in Au Jus Sauce, with Gravy (carved at the buffet table)
*  Marinated Chicken Breast in a Creamy Mushroom Sauce
*  Barbecued Marinated Salmon Filet
All of the above come with:
Baby Roast Potatoes
Steamed Broccoli and Carrot Medley
Caesar Salad
Marko’s Salad

This is a ticketed event only with a deadline of November 5
To attend this event, please go to the CORE Home Page, click on Activities and choose 20ANV Gala Registration.  

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on CORE 20th Anniversary Gala 26 Nov, 2019

September 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

September 24, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for September’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

Norseman Outdoor Specialist

September Presentation by Norseman Outdoor Specialist

Norseman Outdoor Specialist is one of the oldest outdoor stores in Calgary.  They specialize in technical cross-country skiing, hiking and climbing equipment. Established in 1971, their mission then and now has not changed. Norseman has a passion for the adventuring way of life and are dedicated to excellent customer experience’s. They spend time in the community to further their passion and look forward too many more years of helping people enjoy their outdoor adventures. Norseman Outdoor Specialist believe gear should be reliable not disposable. Gear should fit well and they believe in providing exactly what the customer needs, for their outdoor adventure.

Anthony (business owner), of the Norseman Outdoor Specialist will be doing a presentation on Outdoor Clothing, layering and how it affects your comfort and safety. The different types of layers inner, mid and outer layer for different outdoor activities and temperatures.

UPCOMING EVENTS:

CORE Celebrates 20 years:

2008 Hailstone Butte

MARK YOUR CALENDARS – CORE is in the process of organizing “a big bash” to celebrate our 20th Anniversary this coming November.

This will take place on Tuesday November 26

There will be a sumptuous sit down dinner, professional entertainment, quizzes, prizes and a slide show of events over the past 20 years. This promises to be the biggest event ever held by CORE. More details and a sign-up form will be available later. The 20th anniversary celebration will replace the annual Christmas party.

A “memories” photo album has been setup on the CORE photos site (2019 – CORE20ANV) and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

A reminder to all event coordinators that a Trip Report Form is a requirement for all official CORE events (4+ people including coordinator). This includes hikes, bike trips, snowshoe and ski trips, guided backcountry trips and workshops and training courses that are sponsored by CORE.

New:  Event coordinators may now submit Trip Reports for unofficial (<4 people) events, and social events so they are acknowledged for the event in the database.

All Trip Reports should be provided to the Executive Trip Coordinator   in electronic or in hard copy form. For electronic submission, scanned PDF, or photo of the trip report emailed to mailbox@corehike.org as soon as possible after the event is fine. Event Coordinators Guidelines are posted on the CORE website at corehike.org.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August and September 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for August 13 to September 14, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

August 13 – Bald Hills Hike Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 13 – Scramble Hawk Mtn Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 14 – Utopia Mtn Scramble Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 14 – Sulphur Mt Hike Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

August 17 – Glenbow Ranch Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

August 18 – West Wind Pass Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.……………………………………………………………………………………………… 

August 21 – Guinn’s Pass Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 25 – Hailstone Butte Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 31 – Baldy/Barrier Mtn Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Sept 9 – Rae Glacier via Elbow Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Sept 2 Medicine of the Earth Workshop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Sept 14 Fullerton Loop Memorial Hike & Picnic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

News and Notes

Hiker fined $2000.00 for feeding Timbits to a Bear

A B.C. man posted photos of himself feeding Timbits and hot dogs to bears on social media has been fined $2000 and ordered to stay 50 metres away from bears for six months. The man pleaded guilty last week in a Fort Nelson courtroom to violating the B.C. Wildlife Act, while in the northern part of the province. Conservation officers hope this sends a message and stops people from feeding any wildlife. Conditioning bears to accept food from humans is not only illegal but dangerous for the bears and humans.

Under B.C.’s Wildlife Act it states a person must not intentionally feed or attempt to feed dangerous wildlife.

Hiker Bitten by Bear at Lake Louise

On Friday, August 20th, at approximately 4.45pm a person was hiking on the Lake Agnes trail when they encountered a bear. The person kicked at the bear, causing the bear to nip his ankles and tear his pants. The bear then took off into the woods. Parks Canada stated the hiker was treated for minor injuries after reporting the incident. The black bear was trying to get away from the crowds of people. They could not state if this was the same black bear that was seen swimming across Lake Louise earlier.

Following the encounter Parks Canada issued a bear warning for the trails and day use areas in the Lake Louise area, which is uncommon according to wildlife management specialist Jon Stuart-Smith. He believes these incidents are rare, when you look at the number of visitor’s that come to the parks.

Parks Canada at this point would not change their approach to managing wildlife and how they deal with these types of situations. “But will continue to take every effort they can to make sure people understand the ways that they can make themselves safe and the ways they can help protect wildlife and maintain wildlife in the national parks.” Parks Canada will continue to monitor wildlife activity in the park.

Visitors to the park need to avoid wildlife encounters by taken the following steps:

  • Walk in groups and make noise
  • Keep pets on a leash
  • Keep small children close by
  • Carry bear spray and know how to use it
  • Store food and other animal attractants in vehicles or food lockers
  • Be alert for signs and sounds of wildlife

Need to remember that this is wildlife area and people are infringing on their territory.If you do see a bear or other wildlife in Banff National Park report the sighting to Banff dispatch 403 – 762 – 1473.

Whistler Campground in Jasper National Park closed thru the 2020 season

The original plan was to reopen Whistler Campground for the spring of 2020. Parks Canada states “due to the size and complexity of the project has meant that contracting and work at the sited have required more time than initially expected. Keeping the campground closed for the 2020 season will allow the work to take place in a safe and efficient manner.” Parks Canada is sending this notice out the extension of the closure now,  to provide certainty for visitors, business’s and the tourism industry.

Whistler has 800 of the 1800 campsites in the park. Jasper’s local business have raised concerns that the closure could hurt tourism. In 2019 business has been down due to the campsite closure and the weather.

Jasper National Park is removing Online Bear Warnings

Jasper National Park is concerned about the lengths some visitors are willing to go this summer to get the perfect picture with wildlife. “People that are not familiar with wildlife are following, getting close, chasing and pursuing wildlife into the forest to get a better picture. It is happening all over the park,” states Steve Malcolm, human-wildlife conflict specialist with Parks Canada. With increasing visitors, to the park, harassment of wildlife is on the rise.

  • People feeding wildlife, which is on the rise, which means this could have consequences for the animal.
  • People are staying with an individual animal that’s accessing food on the roadside.
  • They will stop on the roadside and spend the entire day following the animal and taking pictures.

Jasper Park is managing 50 to 100 wildlife jams per day. This is traffic jams that happen when tourists slow or stop their vehicles on busy roads to view an animal.

People were going online to the bear report to see the bears location then go to that location to take pictures, instead of staying away from the area. Jasper Park decided to discontinue its online bear report in an effort to give wildlife space and reduce traffic jams.

Banff National Park Not Removing Online Bear Reports – Yet

Bill Hunt – resource conservation manager with Banff National Park stated “officials are closely monitoring the decision by Jasper officials and are keeping their options open for a similar halt.”

Banff askes the public if they see a bear or other wildlife to report it. They use the sightings as data, for where bears are in the park. This is to affirm the bears are out and active in the park. People need to carry bear spray, be alert and follow the safety precautions that the park has in place for wildlife.

Gregoire Lake Park Closed due to Trees Toppling

Gregoire Lake in northern Alberta near the City of Fort McMurray was badly burned in the 2016 wildfire that destroyed thousands of homes in the Fort McMurray fire. The province stated “wet conditions this summer combined with fire-damaged soils caused the trees to fall even in moderate winds.”

The park was evacuated on August 28, 2019 after gusts of 60 km/hour winds caused more than 20 healthy looking trees to fall across an access road. Another 100 trees were downed elsewhere in the park, which has campsites and a beach.

Alberta Environment and Parks, after the Fort McMurray fire, cleared out dead and damaged trees and left the ones that were in good shape.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outside Magasine has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There are some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.  

Banff National Park has stated that it is Elk rutting season and Bull Elk become extremely aggressive protecting their harems during the mating season. The season lasts till mid October.

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by Earl Shaffer

…For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Edible Mushrooms

While hiking this year I have noticed a lot of mushrooms. These mushrooms range in size from small to large. I and other hikers wonder if these mushrooms are edible.

The quantity of mushrooms is due to the amount of rain the province has received this year. Most parts of Alberta received at least 80 mm of precipitations since June.

The fungi for creating mushrooms is always in the soil. When the temperature, light and nutrient conditions are right, this network of threads(for better words) which creates the conditions to form mushrooms. Moisture increases the pressure inside the threads allowing fungi to push its way up out of the soil. Fungi then reproduce by fragmentation, budding or producing spores under mushroom caps. Mushrooms are really important in getting the nutrients that are locked up in dead wood and plants back into nature so other plants can receive these nutrients. Its like a complete cycle of natural fertilization.

Edible Mushrooms I have seen on my hikes:

Black Morel:

Black Morel Mushroom

– Cap is up to 8cm wide, has a honeycomb surface consisting of black/brown ridges and dark brown pits

 – Bottom of cap does not hang loose but is fused to the stem

 – Cap and stem are hollow, form a single continuous hollow chamber

 – Stem is whitish and smooth

 – Grows singly or in numbers on the ground

 – Appears in early spring

                                                      – Morels can vary in shape, size and colour

Common Puffball:

Common Puffball Mushroom

  •  – Body is up to 6 cm broad, pear shaped, white to dull white, with small spines that break off

– Flesh is firm and all-white

  •  – Flesh cannot show any gills, no thick rind
  •  – Appears in the summer and fall
  •  – Grows singly, in groups or clumped together on forest beds under conifers and hardwoods

 

 

Fairy Ring Mushroom:

Fairy Ring Mushroom

– Cap is up to 6 cm broad, flying-saucer shaped with a central hump

– Cap is smooth, tan to light brown

  •  – Flesh is thin, white

– Gills are broadly attached to the stem, tan, well-spaced

– Stem is solid(not hollow) and tough, too tough to break with fingers

– Grows in grassy areas, meadows and fields, forming rings in the grass, appears in spring, summer or fall

Hedgehog Mushroom:

Hedgehog Mushroom

– Cap is up to 10cm broad, smooth sometimes wavy at the edges, light brown with an orange tint

– Underside has distinctive spines that are cream-coloured

– Flesh is white, slowly and unevenly discolouring to yellow-brown when cut

– Occurs alone or in numbers, growing in association with conifers and hardwoods

– Appears in the summer and fall

Hexagonal-pored Polypore Mushroom:

Hexagonal Mushroom

– Cap is up to 8 cm broad, cream-orange to brownish-red

– Underside is whitish and has large, hexagonal shaped pores each less than one mm wide

– Grows singly or as several on hardwood branches and twigs

– Appears in summer or fall

 

Mica Cap:

Mica Cap

– Cap is cone to bell shaped, up to 6 cm broad, dry, with light brown with furrow lines radiating top to bottom

– Young mushrooms often have glistening particles on the cap

  • Gills are nearly free from the stem and white/grey when young

– Stem is silky white, hollow

– Grows in tight clusters in grass or ground covering wood debris during cool, wet weather

– Appears in spring, summer and fall

Comb Tooth Mushroom:

Comb Tooth Mushroom

– Is white, 10 to 30 cm broad, turning yellowish with age

  •  – Branches arise from a thick stalk that is attached to wood

– Branches have short, white spines along their lengths

– Appears in late summer and fall

– Grows on conifers and hardwoods

 

Remember these may be edible, but you need to be 110% positive you have the right mushroom before picking and/or eating. If you pick a mushroom always wear gloves. You do not know if the stem and/or the cap could be poisonous. Remember there are many poisonous mushrooms out there as well.

Leave picking and eating mushrooms to the Experts

 

       TAKE CARE, AND HAVE FUN!!!!!!

                                                 

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on September 2019 CORE Newsletter

August 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

Remember No August 2019 CORE Member Meeting

September 24, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for September’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

September Presentation by Norseman Outdoor Specialist

Norseman Outdoor Specialist is one of the oldest outdoor stores in Calgary. They specialize in technical cross country skiing, hiking, and climbing equipment.

Anthony from Norseman Outdoor Specialist will be doing a presentation on Winter Safety Gear and Winter Clothing to be wore. More details to follow in CORE’s September Newsletter.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

We are now about halfway through our summer season, with lots of outings planned for the rest of July, August and September. If you would like to join any of our hikes or courses, you must be a CORE member. You can submit a membership form online  and pay your fees by credit/debit card. If you wish to pay your membership fee by cash or cheque, please complete the Membership Form online,  indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque, and mail your fees to the address indicated on the webpage. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to include a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email) along with your payment.

As a ps, please remember that the CORE executive members are volunteers and have real jobs besides managing CORE activities. Electronic payments are generally processed in a couple of days. Mailed forms and payments may take a couple of weeks before you get your membership card and access to the Event Calendar.

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July and August 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for July 15 To August 14, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

July 21  4 Lakes Vista Arnica Twin Lakes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

July 21 Fox Creek Summer Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

July 25 Healy Simpson Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

July 28 Rainy Summit Sunrise Elbow Valley Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.……………………………………………………………………………………………… 

 

August 2 Coleman, Crowsnest Pass Weekend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

August 3 Crowsnest Mtn Chinook Lake

 

August 3 Crowsnest Mtn Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 3 Livingstone Range Chert Quarries Hike

 

August 3 Livingstone Range Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

August 4 Phillips Pass Hike

 

August 4 Table Mtn Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 7 Yoho Iceline Trail Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

NEWS & NOTES

Ha Ling Peak

Ha Ling Peak Trail Reopened

Ha Ling Peak Trail reopened on August 9, 2019 after a one-year closure.

Alberta Parks stated, The Trail needed upgrading due to erosion, which was damaging the trail’s ecosystem and creating safety issues (steep sections) for users. Portions of the old trail were exposed to avalanche hazards and endangered white bark pine trees growing on Ha Ling were vulnerable to damage from hikers.

Cost of the upgrade was $850,000. The contractor put in hand railings, ladder staircases and more than 400 overlapping rock steps. The also, made the slop more scenic, clearing out some trees and putting in benches at viewpoints along the route. The trail is a lot wider in some areas, and they have made it less steep in other areas. The construction took longer than expected due to weather.

The Ha Ling Trail can see 600 people climb the steep, three – kilometer hike during high season each year to the summit, states Alberta Parks.

Hikers struck by lighting storm in Banff National Park

A woman was hiking on Mount Bourgeau at about 1 pm on July 20th when a storm rolled in and was either struck by lighting or had a strike near her. She was knocked out by the lighting strike. When she regained conscious she called Parks Canada, not knowing where she was. Parks Canada pinpointed her location using her phone through the 911 system. Parks Canada then responded by helicopter and transported her down to the EMS crew at Sunshine Village. She was taken to Calgary for treatment of burns on various parts of her body. The woman was hiking above the tree line at about 2800 to 2900 metres.

Another pair of hikers were caught in the same storm, and were struck by lighting while hiking on Mount Temple. The hikers reported that their legs were burned, pants caught on fire and the force of the strike blew their shoes off. These hikers were above Sentinel Pass at and elevation of about 2800 to 2900 metres. There were above tree line as well.

Being struck by lighting is not common. You need to be aware of any thunderstorms coming in, especially if you are above tree line. If you are injured by lighting strike in the national parks, contact Parks Canada right away, so they can respond as quickly as possible.

Follow up to the Three Bear Cubs found in Banff Washroom

Two of the three bears are being tracked by Parks Canada, and are currently feeding in a Banff Parks Valley along with 63 other bears. Parks Canada still does not know how the three cubs got into the washroom.

Lake Louise Shuttle lineups testing tourist patience with long waits

Long line ups for Lake Louise shuttles is testing visitor patience at some popular spots on the August long weekend. Most passengers had to wait one and a half hours to two hours, to get from one destination to the next in Banff National Park. The shuttles run every 15 minutes from Lake Louise to Moraine Lake as well as other spots in the park. Each bus holds 44 people and riders have to wait in the line to buy tickets for each individual shuttle.

Some visitors missed their bucket list destination because of the lineups. One tourist stated she wanted to see Moraine Lake. They were shuttled up to Lake Louise, then they got into a one-way system which they assumed was going to Moraine Lake, instead they were taken back down to the park and ride area. On asking a Parks Canada employee, she was told that the Moraine Lake tickets were sold out. She and her husband waited an hour an a quarter in the park and ride. And Parks Canada was not taken cash only debit or credit cards which slowed the procedure down again.

This tourist stated “she would like to know why Parks Canada did not inform them, that tickets to Moraine Lake were already sold out when they were in the initial lineup.”

There were two hour waits at the Lake Louise Gondola.

Tourism director for Banff and Lake Louise stated “that tourists need to plan ahead due to the congestion in the mountains during summer months.” Parks Canada, The Town of Banff and Tourism for Banff and Lake Louise have created a resource that shows different ways of getting around Banff National Park. On explore the park website it shows you which parking lots are full and offers other options like Roam Transit and Banff Parking.

 Parks Canada adds new Signage on the Outhouses at Lake O’Hara

New signage is popping up in the Canadian Rockies to show international visitors on how to properly use the outhouses. Staff at Lake O’Hara in Yoho National Park have installed toilet etiquette signs, which ask users to sit rather than stand on the toilet seats in outhouse facilities in June. Per Jed Cochrane, acting visitor experience manager for Banff, Yoho and Kootenay National Parks, “some international visitors who are not used to western-style toilets, have attempted to stand up on the seats, when using the toilet.” “Standing on a toilet can lead to a broken seat or seal at the bottom of the toilet as the weight is higher up than it should be. And there is the risk of falling in.” Canada’s National Parks are seeing an influx of international visitors who are not used to this style of toilet.

Yoho Toilet Signs

Jia Wang, deputy director of the China Institute at the University of Alberta, states “this is a cultural difference in how toilets are used and the sanitary conditions.” “Squat toilets are still commonly used in public spaces. For a lot of people, their argument is: I don’t find it sanitary to be sitting on the seat.” She did state “there is no excuse for standing on a toilet.” “By offering alternatives or seat covers, some tourists would be more comfortable using it.”

These tourists need to recognize that they are in front and back country (not a city)- there is no luxury here! Editors opinion.

Parks Canada are considering adding toilet etiquette signs in other locations, like Lake Louise. They have started using signs with pictures rather than words to help tourists who cannot speak English or French.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outside Magasine has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There are some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.  

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by Beverly Sill

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Heat Related Illness:

Heat Cramps:

Heat Cramps are painful muscle cramps, usually in the legs and/or abdomen, caused by losing too much water and salt through sweating. And by exercise or physical work in a hot environment.

Symptoms of Heat Cramps:

  •  Cramps
  • Excessive sweating. In a dry environment (hot, sunny day) the person may not seem to be sweating, as the sweat evaporates quickly.

First Aid for Heat Cramps:

  • Give conscious person water or drinks with electrolytes and carbohydrates. Person can have as much as they want.
  • If cramps don’t go away, continue to hydrate.

Heat Exhaustion:

In hot weather, your body cools itself by sweating. the evaporation of the sweat regulates your body’s temperature. When you exercise strenuously or overexert in hot, humid weather, your body is less able to cool itself efficiently. The person has lost fluid through sweating. Circulation is affected because the blood flows away from the major organs and pools in the blood vessels just below the skin.

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion:

  • Excessive sweating
  • Dilated pupils
  • Person may complain of dizziness, faintness, blurred vision, headache or cramps
  • Cool, moist skin
  • Week rapid pulse
  • Rapid shallow breathing
  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Low blood pressure upon standing
  • May go unconscious
  • Heat Exhaustion could lead to Heat Stroke if not dealt with quickly

First Aid for Heat Exhaustion:

  • If person is conscious:
    • Stop all activity and rest
    • Move to a cooler place
    • Give water or drinks with electrolytes and carbohydrates
    • If person vomits give nothing by mouth
    • Place person in a resting position or on back in a cool place
    • Remove extra clothing and loosening tight clothing at the neck and waist
  • If person is unconscious:
    • Place in a recovery position
    • Monitor ABC’s (Airway, Breathing, Circulation)
    • Get help as soon as possible.

Heatstroke (Sunstroke):

Heatstroke is a life-threatening condition where the body’s temperature rises far above normal. It is caused by prolonged exposure in a hot, humid environment. The body’s temperature control mechanism fails, sweating stops and the body’s temperature rises rapidly. In exertional heatstroke, the body’s temperature rises rapidly due to the heavy physical exertion in higher temperatures, even though sweating continues. This  condition needs to be treated immediately, as it can cause permanent brain damage or death.

Signs of Heatstroke (Sunstroke):

  • Body temperature rapidly rises above 40 Celsius or higher, the person is hot to the touch
  • Pulse is rapid and full but gets weaker in later stages
  • Breathing is noisy
  • Skin is flushed, hot and dry or hot and sweaty in exertional heatstroke
  • Person is restless and may complain of headache, fatigue, dizziness and nausea
  • Vomiting, convulsions, unconsciousness

The difference between heat exhaustion and heatstroke is the condition of the skin. Heat exhaustion skin is moist and cool, while heatstroke the skin is hot, flushed and maybe dry or wet.

First Aid for Heatstroke:

  • You urgently need to lower the body temperature of the person
  • Move the person to a cool, shaded place
  • Cool the casualty, remove person’s clothing(discreetly) and place in cool water
    • Or put ice around the person
    • Or put cool wet sheets or clothing over the person
    • Sponge the person with cool water
      • Put water, ice or wet cool items around the person’s armpits, neck and groin areas
  • When person’s body feel cool to touch, cover with dry sheet or clothing
  • Put the conscious person in a comfortable position
  • The unconscious person put in the recovery position
  • Keep monitoring person
  • If temperature begins to rise again repeat the cooling process
  • Seek medical aid right away

Precautions to prevent Heat Related Illnesses:

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothing – wearing excessive clothing or tight fitting clothing will not allow your body to cool properly
  • Protect against sunburn – sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself,  wear a wide brim hat and sunglasses and use sunscreen with a high SPF. Apply sunscreen generously and reapply every 2 hours or more, especially if you are sweating
  • Drink plenty of fluids – staying hydrated will help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature
  • Take extra precautions with certain medications. Watch for heat related problems if you take medications that can affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat
  • Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day – slow your pace down
  • Get acclimated to the heat – until you are conditioned to the heat, limit your exercise time

       TAKE CARE, AND HAVE FUN!!!!!!

                                                                                                                            

 

 

 

……………………………………………..….

….see you on the trails …

Jane

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on August 2019 CORE Newsletter

July 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

 

July and August 2019 CORE Monthly Meetings

At the June CORE meeting a vote was taken to amend the Bylaws to remove the frequency  of CORE monthly meetings, so that the Executive can decide when monthly meetings should take place. The vote was unanimous from the members.  Consequently, it was announced that CORE would not hold meetings in July and August this year. CORE monthly meetings will resume September 24, 2019.

Upcoming CORE Special Events:

August 2 to 5 – CORE’s Annual August Hiking Weekend in Crowsnest Pass

Members wishing to join the group in Coleman for the hiking weekend should book their accommodation as soon as possible, while there are a few rooms remaining. All details on CORE calendar.

August 11 to 15 – Four Days in Jasper – Hiking and Scrambling

Three CORE members are planning a trip to Jasper from August 11 to 15 and have invited other CORE members to join them. You need to arrange your own accommodation and travel. Go to the CORE event calendar for more information.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

We are now about halfway through our summer season, with lots of outings planned for the rest of July, August and September. If you would like to join any of our hikes or courses, you must be a CORE member. You can submit a membership form online  and pay your fees by credit/debit card. If you wish to pay your membership fee by cash or cheque, please complete the Membership Form online,  indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque, and mail your fees to the address indicated on the webpage. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to include a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email) along with your payment.

As a ps, please remember that the CORE executive members are volunteers and have real jobs besides managing CORE activities. Electronic payments are generally processed in a couple of days. Mailed forms and payments may take a couple of weeks before you get your membership card and access to the Event Calendar.

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

June and July 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for June 15 To July 14, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

June 15 Karst Springs and Mt Shark Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

June 16 East End of Rundle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

June 22 Yamnuska Circuit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

June 26 Beehives and Devils Thumb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.……………………………………………………………………………………………… 

June 29 Booze Broads and Brothels Historical Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

June 29 High Noon Hills and Sheep River

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

June 30 Bow Valley Provincial Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

June 30 Door Jam and Loder Peak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

July 3 Lady MacDonald Slow and Steady

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

July 7 Pigeon Mt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

July 13 Ptarmigan Cirque and Arethusa Cirque

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

July 14 Porcupine Ridge Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

NEWS & NOTES

Banff Black Bear feasts on Illegal Camper’s Food

On June 12, 2019 an illegal camper called 911, just before midnight, stating that a black bear had raided his unsecured food for an hour, just meters away from his tent. Charges are pending against the illegal camper. He had set up a tent in the woods near Fireside day use area on the Bow Valley Parkway. Per Banff National Parks, “the bear got into all his food, this was a substantial food reward, and this bear is at risk of becoming food conditioned.” The area of Bow Valley Parkway,  where this man was illegally camped, is closed overnight at this time of year to provide space and security to wildlife, such as bears and wolves. Illegal camping is dangerous for visitors and wildlife and it puts other future visitors at risk if its causing food conditioning in bears. Parks Canada also stated the man was lucky, once the bear was finished with the food, the bear could have gone for the tent, where the man was huddled. Illegal campsites have no bear-proof bins for garbage.

By the time wildlife specialists arrived at the illegal campsite the bear had moved on. A trap was set up later in an attempt to capture the bear. Bears can become bolder around people once they developed a taste for human food. Parks Canada continues to monitor this situation.

The number of illegal campsites in Banff National Park  has been increasing over the last few years. Parks Canada has a zero tolerance for illegal camping. They state illegal camping can lead to more issues of food conditioning of wildlife.

Alberta Parks issues warning for Food Conditioned Fox

Conservation officers state that a red fox is approaching people to within a few feet in search of food. The fox has been reported in the area of Sundance Lodges on Highway 40. This fox has been approaching campsites, and picnic areas. People need to securely store all food and potential attractants so this fox does not get any more human food. If this fox is in the vicinity and smells human food it will approach. You need to scare the fox away by acting assertive and aggressive and not letting the fox close the space between the food or a toddler.

Foxes are not very common in Kananaskis country, but there have been frequent sightings reported along Highway 40 between Barrier Lake and Kananaskis Golf Course.

Anyone caught feeding wildlife in Kananaskis Country can be issued a $287 fine and evicted from the facility.

Parks Canada monitoring a collared Banff Wolf

Wildlife specialists are monitoring a yearling wolf from the Bow Valley pack. The young gray coloured female wolf was captured and fitted with a GPS in May near Tunnel Mountain campground, allowing her movements to be tracked. The wolf has not shown any signs of aggression, but shows indifference towards people, even within close range in daylight and has been curious around vehicles. The wildlife specialists are trying to stop the wolf from becoming food conditioned. Once animals get a taste for human food, it is really hard to change their behavior.

These specialists state “Anytime an animal becomes food conditioned, whether it’s wolves or bears or foxes, it increases the risk to people, but also to the animals. We will more likely have to kill a food conditioned animal if they start acting aggressively towards people to get food. That is why, you never feed or entice wildlife.”

Great Horned Owl

Grassi Lakes, Canmore,  Climbing Closures for Nesting Owls

Some climbing routes are closed at Grassi Lakes to avoid disturbing the nesting owl site. The closure, which is in place each year to protect the great horned owls nesting in the rock face, applies to the left side of the Graceland rock climbing area, including You Ain’t Nothing But a Hang Dog, Memphis and It’s Now or Never.

The great horned owl is Alberta’s provincial bird and is commonly found throughout Alberta. Their nesting sites can vary widely, and include stick nests of other birds, snags, large tree cavities, cliff ledges, rock outcrops and caves. Pairs mate for life and share the duties of raising owlets. In Alberta, two to three eggs are laid in late February and early March. If the first clutch is lost, the female may lay a second clutch, usually with fewer and smaller eggs.

 

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outside Magasine has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There are some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Links

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Unknown

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environmentmailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

World Heritage Sites

Alberta’s Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Alberta’s Write-On-Stone Provincial Park

This year there are 35 new sites being nominated by their respective countries.  There are currently 1092 World Heritage sites across the globe. Canada currently has 20 natural and culture sites.

To be granted UNESCO World Heritage status to landmarks or areas deemed to have cultural, historical, scientific significance, which then go on to be legally protected by international treaties.

This year, the only Canadian site being considered is Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park and was nominated by Parks Canada and the Government of Canada. On July 6, 2019 Writing-On-Stone was given the status of UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park is currently a provincial protected prairie land and now an UNESCO World Heritage Site. This site is home to more than 50 Indigenous rock carvings and paintings. The Bradshaw Foundation (A Geneva based non-profit organization) calls the park the “largest collection of First Nation rock art on the Great Plains of North America.” There is evidence that people have been living in the area for 9,000 years.

UN states Canada’s plan to rescue Wood Buffalo National Park is not sufficient enough

The status of Canada’s largest park as a world heritage site remains in limbo after a United Nations body expressed major concerns about a federal plan to rescue the National Park. Canada needs to put more effort into reversing the negative affects of climate change combined with upstream industrial developments and resource extraction are intensifying, in a draft decision on Wood Buffalo National Park from UNESCO, which manages the UN’s list of World Heritage Sites.

Wood Buffalo, is situated on the Alberta-Northwest Territories boundary, and is one of the world’s largest freshwater deltas and breeding grounds for millions of migratory birds from four continents. The park is almost 45,000 square kilometres of grasslands, wetlands and waterways. It is the world’s only breeding ground for endangered whooping cranes and home to the world’s largest herd of free-ranging wood buffalo. First Nations depend on this area.

Wood Buffalo has been deteriorating for decades. In 2014, the Mikisew Cree asked UNESCO to examine the park and see if it still a merited designation as a World Heritage Site.

The UNESCO report prompted Ottawa to commission a 561 – page study that included 15 out of 17 measures of ecological health that were declining.

Canada proposed solutions such as artificially induced spring floods and other water flows. Ottawa also promised more careful environmental reviews of nearby development and better consultation with local Indigenous People.

Since the report, Alberta has also created a series of wildland areas around most of the park as a buffer zone.

The UN draft states these are good measures including Bill C-69 on environmental assessment.

Parks Canada has committed more than $27.5 million over 5 years to support the federal plan. But UNESCO says more needs to be done due to the size of the park and the complexity of the issues.

At the July 3, 2019 meeting, UNESCO states it will need a full report on the effects of the B.C Hydro’s Site C development on the peace river, as well as an assessment of  risks posed by more than a trillion litres of oil sand’s tailings in upstream ponds. It has given Canada to December 2020 to report on the progress. If it is not satisfactory, UNESCO says the park could end up on the list of World Heritage sites in danger.

……………………………………………..….

….see you on the trails …

Jane

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on July 2019 CORE Newsletter

June 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

June 25, 2019 monthly meeting, a motion to change a bylaw will be put forth

Due to frequent lack of attendance at some of our meetings, the Executive committee has decided not to hold our monthly meetings in July and August, resuming meetings in September.

In accordance with the CORE bylaws, this Special Resolution must be passed by a minimum of 75% of the votes cast at the meeting, the next one being on June 25. Please come and support your club and take part in this Special Resolution which, if passed, will mark the last meeting before we resume again in September.

June 25, 2019 CORE presentation

 Stretching for the Avid Hiker and What’s in your Back Pack

Preparing a thermal wrap

Stretching for the Avid Hiker:

Pre and Post stretches for the avid hiker and a brief introductory to reflexology by CORE member Pamela Anderson a massage therapist, reflexologist and energy worker.

 “What’s in your Back Pack”

How prepared are you for your safety and health on a hike? 12 CORE members attended a Wilderness First Aid Course on April 27th. The course really made you think about your own safety, even before you leave for the hike. I will be talking on how prepared are you and could you survive an emergency with items in your back pack. Plus a demonstration on making a splint and sling, and a thermal wrap.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.  Members and Guests please join us for June’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

On May 28, 2019 CORE elected it’s 2019/2020 Executive:

Chair: Mike, Co-Chair: Chad, Secretary: Laura, Treasurer: Craig, Webmaster: Stu, Membership Coordinator: Stu, Executive Trip Coordinator: Julia, Communication Coordinator: Jane, Presentation Coordinator: Pam, Member at Large: Marion. 

The recipient of the 2019/20 Mountain Chicken Award  was Mike G.

 

Upcoming CORE Special Events:

June 28 – Bike Maintenance 101 at MEC – Fix a Flat

With more members out cycling, this would be a handy lesson. You need to register at MEC yourself.  Register quickly as spacing is filling up. Details on CORE calendar.

July 1 – Canada Day – Celebrate with CORE

Come and celebrate Canada Day with CORE. There will be a short hike with a barbeque at Edworthy Park. For details go to CORE calendar.

August 2 to 5 – CORE’s Annual August Hiking Weekend in Crowsnest Pass

Members wishing to join the group in Coleman for the hiking weekend should book their accommodation as soon as possible, while there are a few rooms remaining. All details on CORE calendar.

 

Renewal of Membership for 2019/20 membership year

It is now time to renew your membership for the next membership year. This can be done online using a credit/debit card. However, if you wish to renew by cash or cheque at the AGM, please complete the Membership Form online BEFOREHAND, indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to bring a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email), signed by you, to the AGM, along with your payment. HANDWRITTEN MEMBERSHIP FORMS CANNOT BE ACCEPTED.

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

May and June 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for May 19 to June 9, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

May 19 Mt Lady MacDonald

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

May 26 Ford Knoll Elbow Valley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

May 28 CORE AGM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

June 1 1st Peak of Nihahi Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

June 2 Edgemont Nose Creek Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

June 4 Prairie View Barrier Lookout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

June 7 Inglewood Night Market

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

June 8 Vents Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

June 9 Chestermere Bike Ride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

NEWS & NOTES

Alberta’s Provincial Fire Watch Towers

Barrier Lookout Fire Watcher

On a CORE hike up to Barrier Lookout, we met Shelly the fire watch warden for this lookout. Shelly was very informative. In the last three weeks prior to June 4, they had spotted 10 wildfires between the Barrier, Moose Summit and Mockingbird lookouts. These fires were called into Alberta Wildfire and crews came out to extinguished them quickly, before they grew any bigger.

Lookout Towers are an important part of the wildfire detection system in Alberta. Fire Lookouts are located where visibility is favourable to detect and report wildfires. The towers are either a cabin or steel towers located on the highest ground. There are 127 lookouts located in the province of Alberta. Lookout observers are also responsible for reporting wildlife in a 40 km radius around their cabin or tower. Each lookout covers an area of approximately 5,000 square kilometers.

The province of British Columbia closed all their fire watch towers. The fires are not spotted until they are much larger. Making these fires harder to put out.

 Waterton Lakes National Park rebuilds following the 2017 Kenow Wildfire

The Kenow wildfire burned over 35,000 hectares of land in total. It burned 19,000 hectares in Waterton Park and the rest in BC. The fire burned 39 per cent of the parks area and destroyed over 30 assets.

In order to rebuild what was lost, $96 million from the federal government’s infrastructure is to be invested in 18 projects and an additional $20.9 million to support Waterton Lakes National Parks ongoing recovery from the 2017 Kenow wildfire.

Projects resulting in a closure or major impact include:

  • Bear Hump Trail – to rebuild the steps
  • Work to repair and enhance Cameron Falls viewpoints
  • Red Rock Parkway – to open in summer of 2019
  • Akamina Parkway
  • Townsite Campground, loops B and H
  • Visitor Center
  • Crandell Mountain Campground

For further projects that may impact visitors go to Parks Canada website.

Many of the hiking trails are open.

Rockies Institute in Canmore wants to share Indigenous solutions to handling wildfires in Alberta

Rockies Institute in Canmore received a $500,000 from Natural Resources Canada as part of a climate change study initiative. Minister stated that “we need to explore options where we work with local communities to empower them, tapping into local knowledge and how we actually fight wildfires and come up with initiatives that allow us to reduce the impact of climate change but also find sustainable long-term solutions to the changing climate.

Wildfires have been around along time, as well as fire management. The president of the Rockies Institute in Canmore, “we need a project that melds traditional Indigenous teachings with today’s wildfire problems, but we are not learning from the past.” The goal is to train today’s community members to collect those stories from elders and then share the information on their terms with scientific professionals to find ways to handle the problem differently that uses Indigenous teachings.

Examples: Dead Fall if left in the forest could cause a fire hazard. You can go in and use that dead fall by building something traditional with it. You don’t just clear it away. Also deliberately set burns have been done for ages. In Vancouver, they are using Indigenous knowledge in their method of burning smaller burns at different times of the year. Australia has used this concept for 20 years and is having a positive impact on the number of wildfires.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaelology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Speaker Series:

Badgers in your Backyard:  A glimpse into the ecology of an important predator – presented by Nicole Heim a local wildlife ecologist.  June 19, 2019 from 7 pm to 9 pm at Fish Creek Environmental Learning Center. You must register thru Eventbrite.

 Alert has been issued for Canmore, Kananaskis Country, Redwood and Bragg Creek due to Grizzly, Black Bears and Cougars roaming these areas.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

The Highwood Pass along highway #40 and the Moraine Lake Road in Banff Park are now open.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Links

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking quote – unknown

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Poisonous Plants

3 Poisonous Plants

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy is a straggling or climbing woody vine and can cause an itchy rash. It grows on sandy, stony, or rocky shores and sprouts in thickets, in clearings and along the borders of woods and roadsides. It is a glossy perennial and is spread by seed or by producing shoots from its extensive underground stems.

All parts of the poison ivy plant, including the roots contain the poisonous resin urushiol. Contact with any broken part of the plant may cause a reaction. You may develop symptoms 24 to 48 hours after contact. The inflamed areas often blisters, which leads to intense itchiness. The rash spreads through exposure to the sap, not from the sores themselves. A person needs to come in contact with the sap, not the plant, to develop an allergic reaction .

The leaves of poison ivy have three pointed leaflets. The middle leaflet has a much longer stalk than the two side ones. The leaf can be smooth or toothed, but are rarely lobed. size varies from 8 to 55 mm in length. They are reddish when they appear in the spring, turn green during the summer and in fall have various shades of yellow, orange and red. The plant stems are woody. Grows as a trailing vine with an upright leafy stalks 10 to 80 cm high. Another type is an aerial vine that may clime from 6 to 10 meters high on trees, posts, or rough surfaces. The plant produces clusters of yellow-green flowers during the months of June and July. In September the plant produces berries. The berries are clustered, round, waxy and green to yellow in colour. The size of the berries range from 3 to 7 mm in diameter, and they remain on the low, leafless stems of the plant all winter.

Dead poison ivy plants can still cause rashes, as the urushiol oil can stay active on any surface for up to 5 years. Wear gloves, pants and long sleeve shirts when handling these plants.

No animal can get a rash from poison ivy, but they can get the urushiol oil on their fur, and transmit to a person.

Poison Oak

Poison Oak has an oat-looking leaves. It usually has multi-lobbed leaves, no aerial roots on the stems and fuzzy fruits and leaves. Poison Oak is usually only found in southern British Columbia.

Poison Sumac

Poison Sumac tends to grow in wet soil conditions, has tiny sweet-smelling flowers in the spring. It is brightly covered with red and yellow leaves in the fall with 7 to 15 leaflets. And has cream coloured berries.

All three can cause skin rashes from the urushiol oil in the sap.

Two other Poisonous Plants in Alberta

Death Camas

Death Camas

The Death Camas is common throughout southern Alberta. It can be found in grasslands and in moist areas (e.g. around the edges of sloughs). It flowers in early summer and has long grass-like leaves coming from the base of the stem and small bunches of cream coloured flowers. The Death Camas grows from 20 to 40 cm tall. The bulb of this flower is extremely poisonous.

 

Prairie Crocus

Prairie Crocus

The Prairie Crocus is found in the prairies, hillsides, and dry open woods. The leaves are long-stalked and divided into threes. Blue, purple or nearly white flowers that are hairy on the back. It grows 10 to 40 cm tall. All parts of the prairie crocus are poisonous when eaten, and irritating when they come in contact with the skin.

 

 

 

There are many more poisonous plants and flowers in Alberta. When in doubt, avoid touching an unknown plant until it has been identified.

Sandy Cross conversation website has a section on different wildlife, trees, plants and flowers found in southern Alberta.

 

………………………………………………….

….see you on the trails …

Jane

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on June 2019 CORE Newsletter

April 2019 CORE Newsletter

April 30, 2019 Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for April’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

Dave and Edna in Corsica

April 30 Presentation: A 326 KM walk thru Corsica and Spain:

Core members Dave and Edna will present their 2018, 326 km walking trip thru Corsica and Spain. You will see the Pyrenees Mountain Range in the southern area of Corsica and finish in the Basque region of Spain. Some of Dave and Edna’s journey also, took them into France. Their walking journey took 17 days to complete. Come see their spectacular photos.

 

 

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Coordinator’s Meeting for Summer Events  – April 23

Calling all hikers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, scramblers,camping even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you. Mike has many guide books, maps, computers to help navigate any unknown routes. This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.

The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on April 23, 2019, at 7 pm at his home. For more information go to CORE Calendar. And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities

First Aider Kim fixes Mary’s injury

Wilderness First Aid Course Scheduled for April 27

CORE is sponsoring a “Non Certified” Wilderness First Aid training course on April 27, 2019, at Bragg Creek Community Centre – 23 White Ave. Cost is $15.00 dollars per person. Nicole Elder is the instructor. She provides first aid instruction to the Calgary Police Service members. She has extensive training and expertise and experience in Wilderness First Aid, Survival Training and Search and Rescue. There will be classroom training and outdoor scenario’s. After scenario training there will be general survival techniques. Dress for the weather as some instruction is outside. Course is limited to 24 participants. There will be a wait list so anyone unable to attend is asked to contact the coordinator as soon as possible. There will be an “option” for members to buy a wilderness first aid manual at a cost of $45.00 dollars each. You can register online, on the CORE Website Activities page. A non-refundable $15.00 dollars is requested and can be paid online via PayPal, cash or cheque is acceptable if received prior to registration deadline. Final day for course registration is April 22, 2019. Non-members need to first join CORE ($15.00 Winter/Spring membership) and then can participate in the course.   For more contact information, go to the CORE calendar for April 27, 2019.

 

May 13 – Deadline – For Chicken Mountain Award

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have to May 13 to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org . At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee will be chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of the trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

CORE Annual General Meeting and Social May 28

We should all give thanks to our CORE executive, for their time and energy they put into running the club. At the annual general meeting on May 28, 2019 CORE members will be electing their new Executive. If you are interested and would like some further information about joining the executive, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to Mike.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

March and April 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 23 to April 22, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

March 23 Jumping Pound Loop Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

March 30 Mt Murray Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

March 30 West Nose Hill Creek Park Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

April 6 Silver Springs Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.………………………………………………………………………………………………

April 6 Sulphur Mt Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

April 13 Foran Grade Sheep Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

NEWS & NOTES

Internal Parks Canada report looks for ways to make money by selling, transferring assets

Parks Canada owns about 15,000 infrastructure assets – buildings, roads, dams, etc., worth $17.5 billion dollars. About $8.3 billion of that asset pool is considered non-core (highways, bridges, dams). About half the entire inventory is considered to be in poor condition or very poor condition, requiring up to $2.9 billion in deferred repairs.

Putting tolls on highways that run through Parks Canada sites in Western Canada could net the federal agency about $85 million a year, per a consultants report on how to manage the parks roads, bridges and dams. This estimate was based on using a one-way toll of $2.50 per vehicle and it would cover the costs to build the toll booths, staff them and administration costs. This proposal is not likely to happen. Under the federal parks act, there needs to be an alternative “free route available for the public.” It was suggested in the report to contract out highway maintenance to the private sector or other levels of government. The non-core bridges and dams could be transferred to the province. These proposals could save money, in its operational spending. Parks Canada is currently looking at the consultants report to determine, the best way to proceed.

Spilled Grain from February Train Derailment still not cleaned up in Banff Park

Parks Canada and CP Rail continue to clean up, the spilled grain, from the February 28 train derailment, near the Johnston Canyon hiking trail and the Fireside picnic area. This has led to a closure of the Bow Valley Parkway. Parks Canada oversees the cleanup, CP Rail is responsible for the clean-up of the derailment site.

All derailed train cars and large pieces of metal have been removed by CP Rail. There is still a lot of grain to be cleaned up. The canola is spread all through the forest floor and down into the moss areas that were heavily damaged when the cars hit.

Hibernating animals are starting to wake up, which is presenting another challenge for the  clean-up efforts. The animals may smell the grain and head to it in search for food. Parks Canada has erected an eight foot electrical fence around the derailment site, which will give animals that attempt to get inside a small shock, in hopes of stopping them from eating the grain.  They are also diverting animals to alternating food sources placed  a distance away. Bears travel the rails at this time of year, as the tracks tend to be free of snow and often have small amounts of spilled grain along them.

The closure of the Bow Valley Parkway was set to end on April 1, but this deadline has now been extended to July 31, 2019. The parkway maybe open sooner depending on the cleanup. For updates go to Parks Canada Banff Bulletins.

Be ALERT for Bear Activity in this area.

Proposed National Park Reserve in the South Okanagan – Similkameen

In a joint government announcement in October 2017 regarding a renewed commitment, the Government of Canada, the Government of BC and the Syilx/Okanagan Nation are developing recommendations, including models for cooperative management, regarding  the establishment of a national park reserve in the South Okanagan – Similkameen.  Recent focus has been on the development of a national park reserve including a boundary.  Parks Canada sought feedback during the public consultations from December 10 2018 to March 15 2019.

In 2002 representatives of the Okanagan Nation Alliance and community members were the first proponents for protecting the area around the South Okanagan Grasslands Protected Area as a national park reserve. In 2003 the governments of Canada and BC steering committee was established as a result of signing of a Memorandum of Understanding to cooperate on assessing the feasibility of establishing a national park reserve in the Okanagan – Similkameen. The principal difference between  a national park and a national park reserve is that the term “reserve” is used to recognize that there are unresolved claims of Aboriginal rights in the area.  Indigenous people can continue to participate in traditional land uses and spiritual activities,  and may be involved in cooperative management with Parks Canada.

By protecting this area, it will help support the recovery of over 30 federally listed species at risk, and over 60 provincially listed species. The shrub steppe ecosystem found in the interior of BC, including the South Okanagan – Similkameen, is recognized as one of the country’s most endangered natural systems. These rare areas of semi-arid desert are the only occurrence of this ecosystem in Canada. It represents an area of significant ecological, geographic, and cultural importance with a wide range of recreational and tourism opportunities.

There has been opposition to this park. Per the director of Okanagan-Similkameen Preservation Society, there has not been any discussion with the federal government regarding possible tax increases to support infrastructure for the park, such as wear and tear on roads and the strain of local first responders if the park entices more people to explore the back country. Parks Canada has not come forward with its budget for park development. Recreational and ranchers, have concerns. Highway #3 from Osoyoos to Keremeos will still be under provincial responsibility,  even thou there could be more traffic due to the new park.

Parks Canada stated that the federal government has no jurisdiction over property rights on privately owned land adjacent to the boundaries of a national park. Land owners and communities adjacent to the proposed national park reserve will retain full authority over their lands. Lands within the national park reserve would only be acquired by mutual agreement. As set out in the Canada National Parks Act. The government of Canada cannot expropriate private property in order to enlarge or establish a national park or reserve. Private lands would only be purchased on a willing seller-buyer basis, based upon independent property appraisals. A transition plan between the Government of BC and the national parks reserve is currently under development.

To learn more on this new park reserve go to Parks Canada Website.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Andy Rooney hiking quote

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

 Spring Time is the start of Tick season in Alberta

Male and Female Tick

Tick season has started in Alberta. Ticks are small spider like animals that bite to fasten themselves onto the skin and feed on the blood. It is important to remove a tick immediately to avoid a potential infection or diseases and submit it for testing. The testing helps to assess the Lyme disease risk to the person and pets.

 

 

 

 

Facts about Ticks:

  • There are over 800 kinds of ticks in the world. 650 are hard bodied and the rest are soft. It’s the hard cover tick that hikers encounter.
  • Adult tick’s range in size from .4 cm to 1.4 cm long.
  • They are oval shaped and appear to have a reddish leathery body with eight legs.
  • Ticks are part of the spider family.
  • Ticks hunt by clinging to grass and shrubs along paths frequented by potential hosts. When a host passes by the tick climbs on.
  • Ticks can sense its host from as far away as 25 feet by the carbon dioxide the host gives off.
  • Once on the host, the tick attaches itself to the skin and sucks the blood. A feeding tick can increase 20 to 50 times its size.
  • Detaching a tick from the host can be accomplished by waiting for it to become fully engorged and then removing it.

 If a tick is attached to your skin, you can safely remove it:

  • Using tweezers, gently grasp its head and mouth parts as close to your skin as possible.
  • Without squeezing the tick, slowly pull the tick straight up off the skin, with a steady backward force until the tick releases its hold – do not jerk or twist it.
  • You must remove any tick parts remaining to prevent infection. If the head is buried beneath the skin and cannot be seized with tweezers, you will require medical attention to remove the tick.
  • Do NOT apply matches, cigarettes, alcohol, oil, tape or petroleum jelly to induce the tick to pull out. These are not effective methods and may prompt the tick to empty its stomach contents into the wound.
  • A technique that may prove effective, is to cool the area near the tick with snow or ice. This cools off the tick’s external environment and slows the blood flow in the area. It is possible the combination of the cooling and tweezering would encourage the tick to detach in order to seek more optimal conditions.
  • Once the tick has been removed, clean the bite area with soap and water and disinfect the area with an antiseptic. Wash hands with soap and water.
  • Save the tick in a clean empty container. You can put more than one tick in the container.
  • Add a small piece of tissue or cotton ball, lightly moistened with water, put into the container to prevent the tick(s) from drying out.
  • Submit the tick for testing as soon as possible. In Alberta ticks seldom carry diseases.     

Submit a tick for testing to:

  • Alberta Health Services Environmental Health Office. In Calgary call 403-943-2400.
  • Your Health Care Provider
  • Veterinarian

Protect yourself from Ticks:

  • Walk on cleared trails whenever possible, avoid walking in tall grassy or wooded areas.
  • Wear light-coloured clothing and cover up as much skin as possible. eg: a hat, long sleeved shirt, long pants with the legs tucked into the boots.
  • Use a bug spray that contains the chemical DEET or Icaridin to repel ticks and reapply as frequently as directed.
  • It takes many hours for a tick to attach itself to a host:
    • Check yourself for ticks after leaving a grassy or wooded area where ticks may live.
    • Check your pets for ticks after they have been outside. You cannot get Lyme disease from your pet, but you can bring infected ticks inside. These ticks can fall off your pet and attach themselves to you. 

If you do get a tick bite and have the following symptoms you should seek medical attention:

  • A round, red rash that spreads at the site of a tick bite, know as a “bulls eye rash”.
  • Flu-like symptoms: tiredness, headaches, sore muscles and joints and fever.

Tick-Borne Diseases are rare but include:

  • Lyme
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Tularemia

 

………………………………………………….

….see you on the trails …

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on April 2019 CORE Newsletter

March 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

March 26, 2019 Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for February’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

March 26 Presentation: Discover Parks – presented by CPAWS – Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Learn about Alberta’s amazing parks from a user and conservation perspective. Discover the fascinating history and purpose of our parks through bio-facts, pictures, case studies and stories. There is a myriad of reasons for protecting nature through the creation of parks. CPAWS will, also, discuss how climate change is affecting our parks, ecosystems and species.

CPAWS (Southern branch) works with Albertans to establish and protect parks and wilderness areas from Red Deer south to the Alberta border, including Kananaskis, Castle and Bighorn.

Coordinator’s Meeting for Summer Events  – April 23

Calling all hikers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, scramblers,camping even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you. Mike has many guide books, maps, computers to help navigate any unknown routes. This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.

The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on April 23, 2019, at 7 pm at his home. For more information go to CORE Calendar. And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities

Wilderness First Aid Course Scheduled for April 27

CORE is sponsoring a “Non Certified” Wilderness First Aid training course on April 27, 2019, at Bragg Creek Community Centre – 23 White Ave. Cost is $15.00 dollars per person. Nicole Elder is the instructor. She provides first aid instruction to the Calgary Police Service members. She has extensive training and expertise and experience in Wilderness First Aid, Survival Training and Search and Rescue. There will be classroom training and outdoor scenario’s. After scenario training there will be general survival techniques. Dress for the weather as some instruction is outside. Course is limited to 24 participants. There will be a wait list so anyone unable to attend is asked to contact the coordinator as soon as possible. There will be an “option” for members to buy a wilderness first aid manual at a cost of $45.00 dollars each. You can register online, on the CORE Website Activities page. A non-refundable $15.00 dollars is requested and can be paid online via PayPal, cash or cheque is acceptable if received prior to registration deadline. Final day for course registration is April 22, 2019. Non-members need to first join CORE ($15.00 Winter/Spring membership) and then can participate in the course.   For more contact information, go to the CORE calendar for April 27, 2019.

May 13 – Deadline – For Chicken Mountain Award

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have to May 13 to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org . At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee will be chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of the trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

2019 – 2020 CORE Executive Election May 28

We should all give thanks to our CORE executive, for their time and energy they put in to running the club. At the annual general meeting on May 28, 2019 CORE members will be electing their executive. If you are interested in participating in running the club and would like some further information about joining the executive, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to Mike.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

February and March 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 19 to February 19, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

Due to extreme cold weather, in February, many events scheduled for these weekends were cancelled or postponed to future dates.

……………………………………………………………………………………

February 23 XC Ski WBC Hostel Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

February 28 WBC Iron Springs XC Ski Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

March 7 WBC Moose Loop XC Ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

March 9 PLPP XC Ski Marl Lake Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

March 9 Ranger Ridge Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

March 16 Grotto Mountain Ice Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

March 16 XC Ski Boulton-Whiskey Jack – Packers Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

NEWS & NOTES

Cougar Warning still in effect for all areas surrounding the Town of Banff

Cougars have been frequenting the areas around the Town of Banff in search of food. Report all sightings immediately to Banff Park Dispatch at 403-762-1470.  Go to Wild Smart on “How to Avoid Cougar Encounters, Handling a Cougar Encounter and Handling a Cougar Attack.”

Greater Bragg Creek Trail Conditions :  

Are very good for Snowshoeing, Hiking and Cross Country Skiing. For more information go to Bragg Creek Trails.

Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park Trail Conditions:

All trails east of the Quarry area are currently closed due to winter conditions. Trail closures are handled by Alberta Parks. For more information go to Alberta Parks Glenbow Ranch.

Mountain Pine Beetle Larvae may be reduced by 90% due to Alberta’s Cold Snap

We may not be able to enjoy our outdoor events, due to this cold snap, but these frigid temperatures is helping to kill the Mountain Pine Beetle. Especially in Jasper Provincial Park where the outbreak is the worse. Alberta has been experiencing an outbreak since 2006, the last three to four years Jasper has been hit hard. The outbreak started in B.C. in 1999. More than 19 million hectares of forest have been destroyed by the beetle.

Beetle larvae are equipped to handle the cold weather up to a certain extent, tucked under pine tree bark. Starting in autumn the beetle manufactures a compound that protects against the cold up to a certain degree and length of time. As the temperature keeps dropping below a certain point, more die. Basically the colder it gets, the more pine beetles die.

Researches at U of A are seeing a decline as much as 90% of larvae killed this winter so far. With the population declining this will help the provincial government with its control tactic’s.  Province of Alberta has been handling the outbreak by doing aerial surveys of forested areas, identifying affected trees on digital maps and sending crews to find that tree, confirm its attach, fall the tree and immediately burn it. Then the crews inspect other trees in the surrounding area to see if they have been affected and carry out the same practice.

The outbreak in Jasper National Park is under the federal jurisdiction hasn’t been the same response. The severity of the outbreak within the park boundary means officials cannot take the same control measures as there is too many beetles. Later this year, Parks Canada has proposed to burn these areas. Which will leave large areas of land, treeless.

U of A is also researching to whether the mountain pine beetle is becoming more tolerant to the cold as they are found in colder, northern climates.

River Otters sighted near Edworthy Park

When hiking down the Bow River near Calgary’s Edworthy Park, you may see Two River Otters out on the ice!!

Two River Otters were sighted on the Bow River near Calgary’s Edworthy Park on February 22, 2019. These sightings were confirmed by wildlife expert Chris Fisher. River otter sightings have been rare in recent years in the Calgary area. The presence of river otters in Calgary area is a good indication of the health of the Bow River and the fish population and the surrounding environment is in good shape. The otters feed on a variety of fish in the Bow and not pose a threat to the river’s trout population. With the arrival of spring they will move into treed areas west of Calgary.

Area in Upper Kananaskis Lake closed to Grizzly Bear Siting

On February 18, 2019, cross country skiers were travelling in the area south of Upper Kananaskis Lake when they came to close to a bear den and woke a grizzly bear. The bear came out of its den and came within one meter of the skiers before the bear took off. A bear closure has been issued in the area following the encounter, which will remain in effect until the end of denning season which is usually early May, to give the bear and any others, its space.

There is no way to identify a bear’s den during winter, as there are many different kinds and they’re often buried in snow. You need to be prepared for a bear and be aware it could happen.  A grizzly bear when it hibernates, their body temperature only drops a little bit, compare to other hibernators, therefore, they are easier to awake and they can respond to anything that they perceive as danger to them.

You should carry bear spray in cold weather. Extreme cold weather may have negative impacts on the effectiveness of bear spray, including that it may not spray as far when used. You should carry the cannisters inside you coat to keep it warm. This will impact a person’s response time, but the bear spray will be more effective. Rules for going out in the front or back country are the same in winter, travel in groups, stick together, make noise, be aware of what’s going on around you.

Beware of Grizzly Presence from 1A entrance west of Banff to Johnston Canyon

Parks Canada is worried spilled grain from a derailed train in Banff National Park will attract hungry grizzly bears to the tracks as they emerge from hibernation in the coming weeks. Twenty railcars from a Canadian Pacific Railway freight train went off the tracks on February 28 west of the Town of Banff. Ten of the derailed cars contained grain, including canola that spilled. Parks Canada says the spilled grain will need to be removed quickly and thoroughly. Parks also stated the spill site will need to be cordoned off with electric fencing to keep wildlife away. The spill occurred between the entrance of 1A west of Banff to Johnston Canyon.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

Friends of Fish Creek Speaker Series

Calgary Captured – Urban Wildlife Film: March 21, 2019, presented by Vanessa Carney, Calgary Parks, The City of Calgary, Need to register thru Eventbrite.

Call of the Wetland: Combining science, nature and community for the health of Calgary’s wetlands. April 18, 2019, presented by Nicole Kahal, Conservation Analyst, Miistakis Institute, Need to register thru Eventbrite.

 The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System is now in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. Rogers Pass in Glacier National Park is a popular backcountry ski touring destination. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need an annual winter pass if you plan to go into the Winter Restricted Areas. The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into three areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter, you need a national pass
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking quote by Mary Davis

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Animal Tracks

Do You Know Who is Following You, or Who you are Tracking??

Identifying tracks to the species level you need to look for certain clues. You usually do not get a full clear track (like toe or nail marks). You need to look for two clues: 1. The Track Pattern of the animal and 2. The overall trail width that the pattern makes. 

Track Patterns

Pattern:  There is a distinct pattern that species use most of the time. It is useful to group animals by their regular walking pattern. There are four basic patterns: 1. Pace  2. Diagonal  3. Bound  4. Gallop.

  • Pace Pattern:  Type of animal that uses this style of walking is the wide-bodied, slow moving types such as beaver, bear, racoon, porcupine. These animals seem to waddle along their wide bodies shifting from side to side. The legs on one side of the body seem to move together, followed by the slumbering of the two legs on the other side. Most of the animals in this category have large, soft, padded feet. These soft padded feet allow them to walk through the woods quietly. The rear feet of these animals are elongated with a long and narrow heel.

Diagonal Pattern:  Type of animals are deer, moose, caribou, elk, fox, wolf, coyote, bobcat and dog. You need to imagine a center line with foot tracks diagonally crossing over it to form the pattern. The rear right foot lands on top of but slightly behind where the front foot right foot was a moment earlier. The front feet of the diagonal walkers are considerably larger than their rear feet. All cats and foxes use the diagonal pattern but the rear foot lands directly on top of the front track. All cats walk with their claws retracted, so the claws do not show in the track. Deer and moose have heart-shaped tracks, the dog family has egg shaped tracks and the fox and cat families have round tracks.

 Bound Pattern:  Includes the weasel family, fisher, mink, otter and marten. These animals have long bodies and short legs. Look for five toes. As they move, the front two feet land first, followed by the rear two feet that land just behind the front. Some overlapping of the tracks may take place.

Gallop Pattern:  Includes the small critters, like squirrels, chipmunks and larger animals like rabbits and hares. This group moves quickly through the forest floor. Their track pattern shows the front feet landing closely together and the rear feet coming around the outside and past where the front feet landed.

Trail Widths

After examining the trail pattern, you now need to measure the trail width. This will narrow the animal to the species level (the chipmunk from the squirrels, the fox from the coyote). Trail widths are measured in various ways based on the walking pattern used. See the track pattern diagram for the proper measuring of trail widths. Below a few examples:

  • Diagonal Walkers: Bobcat 7 to 10 cm, Red Fox 10 cm, Coyote 12.5 cm, Deer 16 to 20 cm
  • Bounders: Mink 7.5 cm, short tail weasel 5 to 6 cm, Long tail weasel 7 cm, Fisher 12.5 cm
  • Gallopers: Chipmunk 5 cm, Red Squirrel 10 cm, Rabbits 12.5 cm, Hares 15 cm

Dominance: 90 per cent of mammals are right dominant. With the gallopers or other animals when their speed or gait increase to a gallop, their right foot lands first. Dominance will also state which way an animal will circle or turn.

There are many good animal tracking books online and thru the Calgary Public Library.

………………………………………………….

….see you on the trails …

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on March 2019 CORE Newsletter

February 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

February 2019 Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for February’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

February 26 Presentation – Colorado River Trip by Core Member Jeanette

Boats at the ready

Join us for a presentation by Jeanette will show us a trip taken by Jeanette, Lynn, Geoff, Laurie and Chad’s (CORE members)  17-day, 225 mile Dory trip down the Colorado River from Lees Ferry to Diamond Creek through the Grand Canyon. Come see the spectacular scenery of the Marble Canyon, Inner George, fantastic side hikes and indigenous ruins, crystalline creeks and waterfalls, cactus gardens, white water, foaming ripples and Lava Falls along with 42 spectacular rapids.

Wilderness First Aid Course Scheduled for April 27

CORE is sponsoring a “Non Certified” Wilderness First Aid training course on April 27, 2019, at Bragg Creek Community Centre – 23 White Ave. Cost is $15.00 dollars per person. Nicole Elder is the instructor. She provides first aid instruction to the Calgary Police Service members. She has extensive training and expertise and experience in Wilderness First Aid, Survival Training and Search and Rescue. There will be classroom training and outdoor scenario’s. After scenario training there will be general survival techniques. Dress for the weather as some instruction is outside. Course is limited to 24 participants. There will be a wait list so anyone unable to attend is asked to contact the coordinator as soon as possible. There will be an “option” for members to buy a wilderness first aid manual at a cost of $45.00 dollars each. You can register online, on the CORE Website Activities page. A non-refundable $15.00 dollars is requested and can be paid online via PayPal, cash or cheque is acceptable if received prior to registration deadline.  For more contact information, go to the CORE calendar for April 27.

Note: Club members intending to register should do so by mid-March to assist in the planning for the course.

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to Mike.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

…………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

January and February 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 19 to February 19, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

Due to extreme cold weather, in February many events scheduled for these weekends were cancelled or postponed to future dates.

……………………………………………………………………………………

January 19 Fox Creek  and Elk Pass XC Ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

January 19 1st CORE night XC ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………….

January 20 Rawson Lake Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

NEWS & NOTES

Unofficial Trail in “Secret Cave” area of Johnston Canyon closed by Parks Canada to protect Unique Birds

There used to be up to 15 nesting pairs of Black Swifts in Johnston Canyon, but as of August 17, 2018 there is just one or two.  The Conservation Manager believes there was a single fledgling that survived in 2017. In an effort to entice the unique bird population back to Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park they have closed a popular, unofficial trail. This area is known to locals as the “secret cave”.

Black Swifts are mostly found in coastal regions but also nest in canyon habitat in the mountains. These birds lay one egg at a time, typically in May. It takes nearly a month for the egg to hatch, then unlike most other birds, the young do not grow feathers needed for flying for another two months.  Johnston Canyon is the only nesting site for black swifts in Alberta. The main trail is not affected by the closure, only the unofficial – off trail (this trail leads down into the canyon by the water) is closed. Closure is too November 15, 2018 and could be in place next year. Parks does not want to affect ice climbing in the winter months, and by then the birds are gone. If anyone is caught in this area, they will be fined by Parks Canada.

Canada concerned about U.S. plans to drill in Caribou refuge

The Canadian government, two territories and several First Nations are expressing concerns to the United States over plans to open the calving grounds of a large cross-border caribou herd to energy drilling, despite international agreements to protect it. Environment Canada has sent a letter to the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, stating the potential trans-boundary impacts of oil and gas exploration and development planned for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain. As most of the wildlife that inhabits this refuge is shared with Canada. The Porcupine herd is one of the few remaining healthy caribou populations in the North. A small population of this herd migrates to Jasper National Park then returns to the North prior to calving season. The Porcupine herd in this refuge numbers 218,000 and is growing. Canada wants assurances from the U.S. about the content of the environment study.

Adult caribou can co-exist with development, but they avoid any disturbance on their calving grounds. Canada is concerned that oil and gas exploration and development will negatively affect the long-term reproductive success of the Porcupine caribou herd. And the U.S. is aware of this possibility.

Parks Canada stops plans to build a Parkway Bike Trail between Banff and Jasper Nat’l Park

Park Canada says it will not go ahead with a plan to build a bike trail along the Icefields Parkway that runs through Banff and Jasper National Park. The federal agency had budgeted about $86 ($66 million for the bike pathway, $20 million for parking lots, campsites and washrooms) for the 107 kilometer cycling route from the Jasper townsite to the Columbia Icefields that could eventually extend to Banff townsite. Per Jason Bouzanis, director of communications for Parks Canada, “Ecological integrity is a primary focus for Parks Canada in the management of the national parks, and this is the main reason the bike path is not being built.”  The Icefields Parkway is considered a classic cycling tour, but riders are restricted to its narrow shoulder. Parks Canada had proposed a separate, paved route buffered from the busy road by 10 to 20 metres of trees. Environmental groups had voiced serious concerns about the project. Stating it would cut through critical habitat for caribou, grizzly bears and migratory birds. The proposed bike trail was compared to the one in Bow Valley through Banff National Park. The big difference, there is a fence along the highway and the bike trail is inside that fence. There was not going to be a fenced-off trail along this project.  Parks Canada had acknowledged that the trail could affect wildlife and pose safety risks and induce further development. The bike path would have gone through critical habitat for two endangered species, the mountain caribou and the whitebark pine. And create encounters between grizzly bears and cyclists, who are less likely to carry bear spray and travel quietly and at much higher speeds than hikers.

Waterton Lake National Park to receive $21 million from Ottawa

The Kenow fire scorched 40 per cent of the park. The flames burned 200 square kilometres and 80 per cent of the park’s hiking trails. The visitor center and other buildings were destroyed. Waterton’s townsite and historic Prince of Wales Hotel were saved. Park Superintedendent Salman Rasheed stated the first projects will be repairs to the 14 kilometer Red Rock Parkway and a rebuild of the popular Bear’s Hump hiking trail. Restoring the 16 kilometer Akamina Parkway and Crandell Mountain campground will need more time for planning and design. Some money is going toward monitoring and protecting the park’s ecosystem.

Kenow Fire at Waterton Lakes National Park has un-covered the Past

Freshly burned environments may provide a new start for invasive species, but they can also uncover the past. Parks Canada is conducting research in collaboration with local Blackfoot people into indigenous archeological sites, plus other sites discovered due to the Kenow fire.  Lead archeologist Bill Perry from Parks Canada states “what has been uncovered shows How the Blackfoot people really lived, revealing large areas of Blackfoot camps within the last 300 years. They have uncovered arrowheads, glass trading beads and stone tools. The fire also revealed trails that the Blackfoot people used over 7000 years ago. Another find is a depression-era work camp. In 1930’s the federal government hired men to build a major roadway thorough the park. Foundation of structure’ s in the camp, rusty tine tobacco, meat, condensed milk and coffee cans from that era have been discovered. These artifacts will change the parks history and they are mapping these finds, so they can be plotted onto maps, which will be verified with archival and aerial photos as well. To create a new history for this area.

Parks Canada forces Sunshine Village to sign new 42 – year lease

Ralph Scurfield, president and CEO of Sunshine Village, Ski resort, was forced to agreed to a new site guideline for Sunshine or have his family’s business sold by Parks Canada. Parks Canada gave Sunshine owner to January 21, 2019 to sign the 42-year lease with the site guidelines appended. If the 2020 lease was not signed, Parks Canada would impose two options on the owners, either: Sunshine would sell its infrastructure to Parks Canada for $1 dollar (and Parks Canada would tender out the property) or remove all infrastructure and return the land to its natural state. The new site guidelines reduce the leasehold by 61 hectares (land that is currently zoned and previously approved) and gives Sunshine no new parking. Parks Canada is urging Scurfield to build a 500-vehicle parking structure at a cost of $50 million (not an option for the owner due to cost).

Sunshine Village was the last ski resort in the mountain parks without the guideline that allows for managed growth while protecting the environment. The new guidelines would allow Sunshine Village to have up to 8500 visitors at a time from the current 6500. And build  an additional 3,650 square metres of commercial space, add up to eight new ski lifts and develop up to 80 hectares of new ski terrain.

Parks Canada rejected Sunshine’s parking proposal which included a 750-space satellite parking lot along the resorts access road, but the guidelines allow for more transportation and parking through a combination of transit and a parking structure of no pre-determined size at the base of the resort. Parks Canada states ” The Sunshine Village Ski area guidelines will provide a long-term predictability for the operator while ensuring that ecological integrity, including the protection of wildlife is the firs priority for decision making.”

Another concern by conservation groups is the increase number of visitors, in the new lease and the ecological concerns in Banff National Park. Which currently is only ranked as fair.

Cougar Warning now in effect for all areas surrounding the Town of Banff

Cougars have been frequenting the areas around the Town of Banff in search of food. Report all sightings immediately to Banff Park Dispatch at 403-762-1470.  Go to Wild Smart on “How to Avoid Cougar Encounters, Handling a Cougar Encounter and Handling a Cougar Attack.”

 The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System is now in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. Rogers Pass in Glacier National Park is a popular backcountry ski touring destination. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need an annual winter pass if you plan to go into the Winter Restricted Areas. The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into three areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter, you need a national pass
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

Kananaskis Speaker & Discovery Series: Winter Survival Skills

Join Jim Thorne of Foothills Search and Rescue, and discover basic winter survival skills, such as shelter building and fire starting. Dress warm and prepare to be outside. This is a free information series. Date: February 17, 2019  1.00 pm to be at Peter Lougheed Park, Discovery & Information Centre.  For more information email Joe Fowler (joe.fowler@gov.ab.ca)

X-Country Ski and Snowshoe Courses

University of Calgary Outdoor Club is offering different levels of x-country ski courses from beginners to refresher courses.  You can rent x-country ski equipment from the u of c outdoor club as well. If you take a x-country ski course with this organization then you can receive a 10% per cent discount on x-country ski equipment rentals. The same applies for snowshoeing. Go to the link below and search for snowshoeing or X-Country Skiing. For more information go to UCalgary Outdoor Adult Active Living

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Winter snow quote Antoine van Kleef

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Another Outdoor Winter Activity: Cross Country skiing:

Cross Country skiing is another way to get active in the winter and enjoy the beauty of the snow-covered landscape. Cross country skiing is a form of skiing where skiers rely on their own strength to move across snow-covered terrain. Cross country skiing is widely practiced as a sport and recreational activity however some still use it as a means of transportation.

 How to Choose X-Country (Nordic) Skies:
  • Your skiing style: Do you want to glide smoothly in set tracks, or do you want a workout as you zip along at high speeds? Maybe you want to explore? Knowing how you plan to use your skies is the first step to choosing the right pair.
  • Choosing the right ski size: The correct length is critical to an enjoyable ski experience.
  • Waxable or waxless bases: For classic skiing and off-track touring, this is a key choice. There is advantages to each style.

Three Skiing Styles:

  • Classic Style: This style of skiing is the stride and glide motion.
  • Skate Skiing: Skate skiing is done on groomed paths, often next to track-set terrain. Skate uses a pronounced pole plant an angled skating motion.
  • Off Track Touring Skiing: Most of your skiing is done on ungroomed trails and terrain, these cross country skis range from models that are a little wider than classic skis up to bigger mountaineering skis that have metal edges.

Ski Length:

Your weight and skill level are the two main factors to consider when it comes to cross-country ski length.

  • When buying cross-country skis according to your weight:
    • Most classic skis will end up being longer than your height by a certain amount.
    • Some modern classic skis (for recreational skiers) are designed to be skied shorter than traditional classic skis, which makes them easier for novices to handle.
    • skate skis will be closer to your own height in length.

Waxable and Waxless Bases:

Waxable Skistraction comes from the grip wax (kick wax) applied to the middle third of the ski. When you release the kick portion of the ski by unweighting the glide that happens comes from a different was (glide wax) applied to the rest of the base. It takes time to learn to wax for all snow/weather conditions.

Waxless Skisuse a textured surface in the kick zone (rather than grip wax) that grips snow when it is weighted, but still allows the ski glide when you shift your weight off it when you are going downhill. This gripping surface is either a fish scale-like pattern cut into the base material or a replaceable skin patch made of directional fibres. Skiers due not have to worry about day to day conditions when they use waxless skis.

Both Waxable and waxless bases require a glide wax on the sliding sections of the base to glide properly along the snow.

Next step is to choose Ski Bindings:

  • There are three types of bindings:
    • Frame Bindings: heel and toe pieces are connected by a frame.
    • Tech Bindings: Toe and heel pieces have pins that attach to a specific type of boot.
    • Telemark Bindings: always has a free heel during the climb up and the descent.

Your Ski Boots and Bindings must be compatible.

Your Ski Poles, you will want to match to the type of skiing you are doing. The right pole length is based on your height. Poles are made with different materials and come in adjustable or rigid. Don’t forget baskets.

For more information on how to buy XC ski’s and equipment visit the Mountain Equipment Coop website

………………………………………………….

….see you on the trails …

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on February 2019 CORE Newsletter