Newsletters

September 2018 Core Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Event Coordinator Meeting, November 6, 2018

Calling all hikers, snow shoers, x-country skiers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you.

This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.

The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Place and Time will be announced shortly in the CORE calendar.

And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities.

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

September CORE Meeting – Presenting “Walking the 88 Temple Pilgrimage in Shikoku Japan”

September’s monthly meeting is on Tuesday, September 25 at Scarboro Community Centre. It will feature a slide show: “Walking the 88 Temple Pilgrimage in Shikoku Japan”, presented by CORE member Kiyoko.  The 88 Temple Pilgrimage is Japan’s most famous pilgrimage route, a 1200 km loop around the island of Shikoku. While most modern-day pilgrims (an estimated 100,000 yearly) travel by tour bus, a small minority still set out the old-fashioned way on foot, a journey which takes about six weeks to complete. Kiyoko and 3 friends undertook this journey in 2007, and the story of their odyssey promises to be very interesting, so don’t miss it

Members and non-members alike are invited to attend.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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Sept 1 Foran Grade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 3 Mist Mountain – Their finest hour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 9 Rawson Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 15 At the top of Pocaterra Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 15 Pocaterra Ridge Views of the mountains around

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Courses

Regretfully, the Executive had to make the difficult decision to cancel the Wilderness First Aid Course scheduled for Saturday, September 22 due to lack of participation. It was rather surprising as the last time this course was presented it was very well attended and the feedback was excellent.  Thank you to those who sent comments from which, it seemed more a question of scheduling than lack of interest, but that will always be the case.  The Executive will now discuss whether to put this, or another course, on in the near future.

 

Cold and Wet Weather

The weather is starting to get cooler outside, bringing rain and snow.  Ensure you bring a warm layer of clothes and weather resistance gear on your outdoor events.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

September Newsletter clue: “Which type of bear has the longer claws?” The answer is in the Hither and Yon” section of the September Newsletter.

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Hither and Yon

 


 

 

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

 

 

 

 Bear Smart

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Know your different Bears:
    1. Grizzly bear has pronounced shoulder hump, may have silver or grey hairs on face, back and hump, ears are round, nose is pig like, claws longer 7.5 to 10 cm in length.
    2. Black bear are more uniform in colour, nose is dog like, claws are short 2.5 cm in length.
  2. Bear Signs: bear tracks, bear trails, scat, rolled logs and rocks, torn stumps, rubbed chewed and claw marked trees, diggings, ant hills torn up.
  3. Avoid encounters:
    1. Make lots of noise.
    2. Travel in groups.
    3. Walk pets on leash.
    4. Be aware of your surroundings.
    5. Recognize signs of wildlife.
    6. Carry bear spray and know how to use.
  4. If you encounter a bear:
    1. Stop, Never Run
    2. Stay calm and size up the situation
    3. If bear is unaware of your presence, back away slowly the way you came.
    4. If bear is aware of your presence, talk calmly and back away slowly.
    5. In a defensive encounter, if a bear comes within your range, use your bear spray, if bear makes contact play dead.
      1. If attack continues fight back, act big and loud, use your bear spray, attack the eyes and nose.

For more information on handling bears and another wildlife encounters visit Wildsmart at:

  http://www.wildsmart.ca/

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….see you on the trails …

Jane and Stu

 

 

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CORE August 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Seeking Communications Coordinator to Publish the CORE Newsletter

Despite the personal satisfaction in putting together the CORE Newsletter each month, your current author is spending more time in administrative duties than he is on the trails. He needs your help. If you could find the time to put together and publish the small online monthly newsletter, we need you! This is an Executive position as Communications Coordinator and we would of course like to fill it as such, but if you could take on just the newsletter task, then we would be very grateful. Interested? Please email the Executive at mailbox@corehike.org, or contact Carol or Stu for more details on what is entailed.

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

Monthly Presentations

Our Presentation planner(s) have have done a great job in finding presenters for the monthly club meetings at the Scarboro Community Centre, right through to the end of the year, some by club members relating their adventures, and others by very interesting outside presenters. Members and non-members alike are invited to attend. If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for August. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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Golden Hikes

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Golden Scrambles

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Day Hikes

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NEWS & NOTES

Courses

CORE will be sponsoring a Wilderness  First Aid course. This is a one-day, non-certification course, similar to the very successful one we had a couple of years ago. The course will be mostly funded by the club from the Peterman Endowment Fund, but there will be a small registration fee. The planned date is is September 22 at the Bragg Creek Community Centre. Please stay tuned for further information – we’ll post it on the calendar as soon as we have everything firmed up.

Injury Avoidance and Fitness Exercises

The CORE August presenter was chiropractor, Dr. Colin Johnston, who summited Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in 2016. Out of that experience he has developed a set of exercises, particularly in regard to the knee area, to mitigate injuries when participating in strenuous activities. He has kindly provided CORE with a description of some exercises to improve knee streangth. A link to the PDF file, including his contact information, is provided on the CORE Safety Guidelines page.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

The Executive is initiating a contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month (beginning with the August newsletter), there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried withing the newsletter. Collect all the clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for the prize.

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

August Newsletter clue: What is the “Hither and Yon” section of the August Newsletter about?

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Hither and Yon

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

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Ten Daypack Essentials

“Be prepared.” These words of wisdom have been echoed by scout leaders, guides, and seasoned outdoor lovers for generations. It’s true. Weather can change quickly and the unexpected can happen. To manage the risk, add these essentials to your backpack before your next daytrip on the trail. (full descriptions can be found on the ViewRanger link. ViewRanger is a digital APP used for GPS navigation).

  1. Food – Don’t go hungry or skimp on calories.

  2. Water – 4-6 liters or water per day or more if you’re hiking in extreme heat.

  3. Torch or headlamp – It’s no fun to walk–er, stumble–in the dark.

  4. Fire starter – It’s darn near impossible to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together.

  5. Navigation – Map, compass, and app.

  6. Sun protection – Protect yourself with proper sunglasses, sunscreen, and sun hat.

  7. First-aid kit – Injuries may happen when you least expect it, so carry a compact first-aid kit.

  8. Knife – There are countless uses for a knife in the outdoors.

  9. Extra Clothing – Weather can change quick in the countryside and mountains. Pack layers.

  10. Shelter – If your daytrip is super ambitious, demands long hours or distances, or wanders into extreme conditions, consider carrying a lightweight bivvy sack or space blanket.

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….see you on the trails …

Stu

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CORE July 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Shuffleboard

We’ve done a slight rearrangement of roles on the Executive. Stu C. will take over the Communications Role including the Newsletter, and David v.d.E. will continue to contribute as a Member as Large.

Welcome Back Mike

Our friend and hiking companion Mike G. is back to resume his Executive Trip Coordinator duties, after undergoing a pretty serious medical procedure. At times I’m sure it was like dangling from a rope 1000 metres up and catching the tip of your pick axe in a precarious niche on the rock face. Welcome back Mike!

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

Car Pool Rates

With the ever escalating gas prices, the Executive has opted to raise the suggested amount to compensate the driver when you are car-pooling. Please follow these sliding-rate guidelines. The rate is for regular gas per KM round trip for the vehicle / number of people in the vehicle.

Gas above $1.30 per litre: $0.30 per km

Gas between $1:00 and $1.30 per litre: $0.25 per km

Gas below $1.00 per litre: $0.20 per km

For trips within one of the Mountain National Parks (Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Waterton, Yoho) passengers share equally with the driver the one-day entrance fee per car unless the fee is on a per person basis.
The final decision on prevailing gas prices is the Trip Coordinator’s (ie if prices are on the cusp and there is a disagreement between a driver and passenger on which rate should apply).
Remember the golden rule.  Your driver went out of their way to transport you safely on the outing, sometimes over dusty roads. If the car pool fee amounts to, say $13, you could round it up to an even $15 to help pay for a carwash.

For further information about CORE Carpooling guidelines, please visit the Carpooling and Locations page.

Monthly Presentations

We are fortunate to have monthly presentations at the Scarboro Community Centre planned right through to September, some by club members relating their adventures, some by very interesting outside presenters. Members and non-members alike are invited to attend. If YOU have an idea for a presenter who would be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar since our last newsletter. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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June 17 – Black Prince Cirque – Sun and Snow

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June 17 – Descent from Castle Mountain Lookout

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June 24 – Wind Ridge

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July 1 – Grass Pass

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July 14 – Upper Kananaskis Lake – Sarrail Creek Falls

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July 21 – Sibbald Lake Flora

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July 22 – Sherbrooke Lake and Mt Ogden from Paget trail

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July 28 – Centennial Ridge

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July 28 – Ribbon Creek to Troll Falls

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July 29 – Sunshine Meadows – The Lake Circuit

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NEWS & NOTES

Parking in the National Parks

Parks Canada has recently been strictly enforcing prohibitions on parking on the sides of several roads in Banff.  There is now a web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/Banffnow   which shows roughly current availability of parking at a large number of locations you can zoom in on.  The conditions are quite consistent, however, not varying much even on weekends.  The following guidelines may therefore be more useful when planning a trip:

In the cases of Lake Louise and Moraine Lake, road access to the lots is closed to avoid people circling around.  THIS MEANS THAT MORAINE LAKE IS INACCESSIBLE AFTER AROUND 8 AM, AND LOUISE AFTER AROUND 10:00, ALL DAYS OF THE WEEK—even as early visitors leave the parking lots largely empty.  It also means that Paradise Valley trailhead is inaccessible after 8 AM.  (Shuttle buses do not stop there.)

There are several other points to consider:

  • There are free shuttles from the Lake Louise Overflow Parking East of the town interchange to lakeside—BUT THIS LOT IS ALSO FILLED AS EARLY AS 11:00.
  • Louise shuttles run every 15 minutes but THE LAST BUS LEAVES LAKE LOUISE AT 5:30.
  • The Parks will apparently run free shuttles to Moraine Lake from the same overflow area in September—BUT CURRENTLY SHUTTLES ARE PRIVATELY OPERATING AT $25 ROUND TRIP.  Check with the Lake Louise info center for where they leave from, times, and possible need to book ahead.
  • Johnston’s Canyon and Upper Sulphur Hot Springs lots are also generally full by noon, and sometime also Lake Minniwanka.
  • Several other lots with yellow warning labels have NOT been shut so far (over 10 days in July).  This includes Yoho Valley, Emerald Lake, Bow Lake, Peyto Lake, Bourgeau Lake, Redearth Creek, Marble Canyon, and Stanley Glacier.  It is likely fine to plan trips there but early arrivals are recommended. 
  • The websites “last update” times are 24 hour format for EASTERN time, 2 hours ahead of us (i.e. later).  A second column is just a copy in AM/PM format but 4 hours ahead, meaning unknown.

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Hither and Yon

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

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A little inspirational hiking poetry

Tyler C Nelson  – Mt. Baldy
a misty start with worlds to go
a walk through forest, desert, snow
with altitude and dizzy joy
a challenge which my strength employs
a peaceful summit waiting warm
where thought and poetry find form
from near the sun our minds turn
to worlds below we will return

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….see you on the trails …

SC

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June 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

The AGM

CORE held its annual AGM on May 29 with a membership attendance of about 45 people. The business part of the meeting saw the election of a full slate of Executive members to guide the club for the coming year. See the “Meet your new Executive” paragraph below for your new executive members.

The members in attendance passed a motion to waive membership fees for the following year for Executive members who serve the full year on the Executive.

The minutes for the CORE 2018 AGM are available on the CORE website at this link.

The “social” part of the evening included recognition of the club members who have organized summer and winter events throughout the year, presenting of the “Chicken Mountain Award” for the leader of the hike most gone awry – Harvey earned the title  this year -, and a well laid out table of food and refreshments, again, thanks to our energetic and well organized past executive.

Renewing Your Membership

CORE’s new online membership and electronic payment APP has been very successful, with around 100 members signing up by the time of the AGM. A few memberships were submitted as paper hand-written forms at the AGM, but we hope in the future to keep these to a minimum to help streamline the membership signup process and, of course, save paper.

 

Trip Photography

July 2017 East End of Rundle Summit

One very successful feature at the AGM was a photo slide show with pictures from almost every outing from May 2017 to May 2018. There were 125 great photos of places and people to remember from the previous year’s activities, and this was only possible to compile thanks to the great photographs posted on the website by participants in the events. To all you club photographers, please keep up the good work, and remember to post your photos. It helps some of us remember where we’ve been, and certainly makes our club website more interesting.

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You could be the next Event Leader!

—In case you wondered, last season from June 2017 to May 2018,  CORE volunteers put on around 140 hiking, city walks, snowshoeing, skiing and cycling events, plus another 37 socials such as dinners, tennis, skating, slo-pitch, movies, music, Trail Fest, and CMC presentations. These don’t just happen. Last year there were just 10 members who put in most of the effort to organize events. It takes a bit of time but we could use some more volunteers to organize outings and keep the calendar populated with interesting activities. If you have some ideas about trails to explore, or if you would like to get some ideas from people who have done lots of trails, and would like volunteer to organize some trips, please contact executive at mailbox@corehike.org, talk to an event leader when you are out on a hike, or come to one of the CORE monthly meetings.

June 26, CORE Monthly Meeting

Cambodia, land of Angkor Wat, Mekong River, and the Famous “Tuks Tuks”

Mark June 26 on your calendar as long time member, Jeanette, takes us on a colourful journey through much of Cambodia, where she was joined by Harvey and Carol, other long time CORE members.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

May/June 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for mid May to mid June. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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May 19 – Tennis anyone?

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May 20 – Kananaskis – Terrace Trail

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May 25 Long Prairie Ridge and Macabee Creek Loop

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May 26 – Barrier Lookout

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May 29 – When shall we four meet again, at the next CORE AGM

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June 2 – A mountaineering K9 on Wasootch Ridge

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June 2 – Break time on Wasootch Ridge

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June 9 – Grotto Canyon

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Meet Your New Executive

For the 2018-2019 club year we have a full slate of Executive members whose goal is to ensure that activities are run safely, keep the membership informed about what is happening within the club, as well as in the wider outdoor community, organize training programs and presentations, and maintain the website so we can continue to provide online information and the events calendar for the club. Here is your executive for the coming year:

Chair – Julia Trangeled

Julia is a longtime CORE member and has served may times on the Executive. She is an avid summer and winter activity participant, and is one of the organizers of weekend events, as well as weekday evening urban hikes.

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Co-Chair – Jeanette Nelder

Jeanette hails from Kiwi land and is also a long time member of the club and has served several time on the Executive. She is an efficient organizer.

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Treasurer – Craig Morris

Craig has taken on the task of treasurer for the second year now and has been key to getting our online membership payment  system up and running.

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Secretary – Laura Hood

Laura is new to the Executive this year and has volunteered to take on the role of Secretary. After participating in many enjoyable core outings, she felt it was time to get more involved to ensure the good times continue.

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Membership Coordinator – Marian Smith

Marian also has been a member of CORE for many years and has served on the Executive before. This year she has volunteered to take on one of the more challenging executive positions, that of Membership Coordinator. Thank you Marian.

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Executive Trip Coordinator – Mike Galbraith

Mike has been around the club for a long time and has filled various roles on the executive in the past. He is also a member of the Calgary Mountain Club, as well as serving on the executive of the UIAA – the international federation for climbing and mountaineering, so he knows a little bit about safety in the mountains. His role is to monitor and coach our volunteer event organizers to ensure basic practices are followed to keep participants safe on the trails.

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Communications Coordinator – David van den Eikof

Dave is an avid summer season hiker and event organizer for some of the more difficult terrain in the mountains. He too has spent more than his fair share of time on the executive in various roles. He is also a keen photographer and amateur artist.

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Presentations Coordinator – Kim Payne

Kim has been in the club for a few years, and spent her first year on the executive getting our club banner (as in physical banner) and an excellent first aid training course that year. This year she means to line up some interesting presenters for our month-end club meetings.

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Website Administrator – Stu Cox

Stu hails originally from the east coast, so came to mountain pursuits rather late. He is now a great believer in the slogan you see on the sign entering Yoho National Park – “The mountains shall set you free”-. Somehow he fell into the role of CORE Webmaster about 8 years ago, and has so far been unable to convince anyone else to take on the task.

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Member at Large – Kevin Jones

Kev moved from the UK, with Sarah, in 2012 to take advantage of the mountains without having to fly transatlantic to do so.  He has been a member of CORE for about four years, and enjoys hiking in the summer and tries to find time for cross country skiing, downhill skiing and snowshoeing in the winter.  Having joined the Executive for the first time at the 2018 AGM he is wondering what is really involved in being a ‘Member at Large’.  So if you have a suggestion or constructive criticism that you want to feed into the Executive, Kev is a point of contact for you.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Tick bite prevention during tick season

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard, city parks and paths.

Some of the best ways to avoid tick bites are: wear clothing that covers your arms and legs; tuck your pants into your socks or even put tape around openings in clothing so ticks have no access; and wear light-colored clothing to help you see if a tick is on you. When you are in the woods, keep to the centre of the trail, where ticks are less likely to be (ticks tend to stay in shrubs and bushes).

Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin.

  • As soon as you are home, check yourself or have a family member help check you for ticks. Use a fine-tooth comb through your hair and check folds of the skin. You should also shower and wash your clothes at a high heat so any ticks are killed.

The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses are:

Fever/chills 
With all tick-borne diseases, patients can experience fever at varying degrees and time of onset.

Aches and pains 
Tick-borne disease symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity and time of onset of these symptoms can depend on the disease and your personal tolerance level.

Rash 
Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia can result in distinctive rashes

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

Charming Spring © Patricia L. Cisco

Reminiscent melodies
serenade the morning breeze.

Feathered creatures nest with care
in cherry blossoms pink and fair.

Perfumed scent of roses flow.
Tiny blades of green grass grow.

Misty showers soak the earth,
glorious colors come to birth.

Gathering clouds come and go,
rain, sun, and vibrant bow.

Dainty petals, fancy flair,
dancing in the warm, sweet air.

Violets, yellows, purest white,
graceful, gentle, welcomed sight.

Thank you, oh sweet lovely Spring,
patiently waiting the charms you bring!

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/charming-spring

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For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

….see you on the trails …

SC

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May CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Renewing Your Membership – Join now online before the AGM

For all current members, if you haven’t renewed your membership yet, sign up now and pay online ahead of time to make it quicker and easier for you and the membership coordinator. Or at the AGM — If you do intend to sign up at the Annual General Meeting, please submit your membership form online and provide a copy of your confirmation email with your signature and payment to the membership committee at the AGM.

CORE’s Website now has Security Certificate

Recently CORE’s website provider, Nucleus, provided an SSL certificate (security certificate) for the club’s website. Rather than seeing http://corehike.org, you will now see https://corehike.org. Typically, SSL is used to secure credit card transactions, data transfer and logins, and more recently is becoming the norm when securing browsing of social media sites.

Special Motion at AGM

Members attending the AGM will be asked to vote on the following motion:

“Do you agree with waiving membership fees for those who volunteer for the executive each year?”

To qualify for a free membership, volunteers on the executive committee would have to serve a full term, and receive the free membership at the end of their term. Waiving membership fees would give the club the means to thank those on the executive committee and to acknowledge their hard work and commitment.

June 26, CORE Monthly Meeting – Cambodia, land of Angkor Wat, Mekong River, and the Famous “Tuks Tuks”

Mark June 26 on your calendar as long time member, Jeanette, takes us on a colourful journey through much of Cambodia, where she was joined by Harvey and Carol, other long time CORE members.

Participating in the BUY & SELL Event at the AGM – be sure to read!

backpack

For those wishing to participate in the buy-sell event at the AGM, it will commence after the business part of the meeting (in conjunction with the Social gathering). There will be some tables set up to display items for sale, swap or give-away. All sellers should have their items tagged beforehand with their name and the amount they would like to get. All negotiations are strictly between buyer and seller, and the club has no part in the sale other than providing the venue. Please try to come early with your items. The community hall doors will be open at 6:30.

Brand new Salomon boots and skis

This backpack, and brand new Salomon x-c skis and boots will be some of the items at the sale. The boots and bindings use a double bar system. The Salomon boots are women’s size U.S. 6.5 (UK 5), light grey, Sian7 Pilot.

 

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

April/May 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for April 21 – May 16. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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April 21 – Mysterious Maze – Three Sisters Pathway, Canmore

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April 22 – Johnston Canyon “Spring” Hike

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April 29 – A Sunny Spring Day on Fullerton Loop

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May 5 – Beautiful Scenery in Bow Valley Provincial Park

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May 12 – Upper Stoney Trail hike – through lovely mixed forest

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May 16 – Urban hike – Edgemont Hills, they “Rock”!

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MAY MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14 Avenue S.W.

Tuesday, May 29   7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AND SOCIAL

All members are invited and encouraged to attend the club’s AGM on Tuesday, May 29th. It’s always a fun, diverse and enjoyable evening, featuring food and refreshments, a chance to swap stories of adventures past and yet to come, plus the honour of helping to elect a new executive committee for 2018-2019. Happily, this year we already have nominations for a number of executive positions. There will be the annual anointing of the Chicken Mountain award winner, special recognition of trip coordinators, and door prizes. We will also have a “Buy-Sell” event of new/used equipment and clothing. It promises to be a full evening, with something for everyone!

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These CORE members are having fun at one of our AGMs! You can, too, on May 29th.

Pat and Mark

 

 

 

 

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Marvella and Cheryl

 

 

 

 

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Tick bite prevention during tick season

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard. Some of the best ways to avoid tick bites are: wear clothing that covers your arms and legs; tuck your pants into your socks or even put tape around openings in clothing so ticks have no access; and wear light-colored clothing to help you see if a tick is on you. When you are in the woods, keep to the centre of the trail, where ticks are less likely to be (ticks tend to stay in shrubs and bushes).

Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin.

  • As soon as you are home, check yourself or have a family member help check you for ticks. Use a fine-tooth comb through your hair and check folds of the skin. You should also shower and wash your clothes at a high heat so any ticks are killed.

The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses are:

Fever/chills 
With all tick-borne diseases, patients can experience fever at varying degrees and time of onset.

Aches and pains 
Tick-borne disease symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity and time of onset of these symptoms can depend on the disease and your personal tolerance level.

Rash 
Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia can result in distinctive rashes

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

Trip coordinators – Here’s a K-Country hike to try this spring and early summer if you’re looking for great views.

Prairie View Trail to McConnell Ridge or Barrier Lake Fire Lookout is a good hike to do when it’s super windy, as the trees provide shelter from the wind. When you finally break out of the trees at McConnell Ridge, you are rewarded with views of Barrier Lake, Mount Baldy and beyond. There’s a fun little scramble to a higher viewpoint (not recommended if icy), as well as the option to hike up to Barrier Lake Fire Lookout offering 360 views. Return the way you came for the quickest way down. 13.2 km return, 421 m elevation gain. Add on 0.7 km, 100 m elevation gain to the Fire Lookout.

Check this website for other spring/fall shoulder season hikes in Kananaskis Country:

http://www.playoutsideguide.com/2016/11/best-shoulder-season-hikes-kananaskis.html

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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April CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Nominee at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a few positions available for nominations (i.e., Presentations Coordinator, Communications Coordinator and Membership Coordinator). If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Other Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has recently learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline for Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the coming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

REMINDER: CORE’S BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

For further details please visit the Kananaskis Trails website at: http://kananaskistrails.com/ha-ling-upgrade/2018/

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

March/April 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 21 – April 14. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

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March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

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March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoe Gang

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April 1 – Chester to Sawmill snowshoe – Admiring the View Across Valley

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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April 14 – Chris, Ewa and Geoff on Sulphur Mountain Trail

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April 14 – Harvey, Ewa and David at Sulphur Mtn. Summit

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APRIL MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14 Avenue S.W.

Tuesday, April 24   7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Presentation: Tour of South Africa: Cities, Parks, Flora and Fauna

Please join us for our April Monthly Meeting. Following club announcements and updates, our presentation will feature a South African adventure. In 2016 Julia, a long time CORE member, took a trip to South Africa via Dubai.
Going from Dubai, a high end, over-the-top city, to relaxing Cape Town, was a study in contrasts, but both were fascinating in their own way. Table Mountain was a sight to see (on a non-cloudy day). A trip via the beautiful Garden Route led along the coast to Plettenburg Bay and then to the safari park to see “the big 5”, the most amazing enclosed bird sanctuary and a town built on canals. Incredible mountain scenery led through ‘ostrich country’ with enormous caverns, to Stellenbosch in the wine region outside Cape Town where the wines and the scenery vie for first place.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Grizzly Population Stable in K-Country

According to the latest DNA census in Alberta’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

An excerpt from Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

Bears Coming Out of their Dens

Parks Canada confirmed the first sighting of a grizzly bear on March 24 along the Bow Valley Parkway. It’s believed to be male grizzly 122 – also known as The Boss – the largest, toughest and most dominant grizzly bear in Banff, Yoho and Kootenay national parks.

Keep Your Dog on a Leash

BANFF – Keep your dogs on a leash protest song is barking at off-leash pooch walkers in Banff National Park.

It’s illegal to feed, disturb or entice any wildlife in national parks and because an off-leash dog can aggressively confront wildlife such as grizzly bears and elk, there are strict regulations in place. For some further background information about the rules and some Banff local musicians’ efforts to spread the word, please visit this Rocky Mountain Outlook page.

http://www.rmoutlook.com/article/Protest-song-urges-dog-owners-to-keep-pets-leashed-20180412

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment and Parks  https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…These names may bring back happy memories growing up on a farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites, or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes: bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we might drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

10 Suggested Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

CORE Event Coordinators – Try to add some of these hikes to the club calendar this spring

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle

    View from Tunnel Mountain

  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake
  • Johnston Canyon
  • Lake Louise Lakeshore

For more information on these hikes, visit:

https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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March CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Volunteer at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a couple of positions available for nominations. If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Calgary Ski Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline – Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

 

REMINDER: CORE’s BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

February/March 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for ?????  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek Trail

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

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March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

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March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoers

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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????? Chester to Sawmill – Admiring the View across the Valley

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FEBRUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Members and Guests – Please join us at Scarboro Community Centre, 1737 – 14th Avenue S.W. Tuesday, March 27, 7:00 p.m.

Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks

Following club announcements and updates, our guest presenter will be Dale Leckie, author of a recently published book called Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks.

An award-winning geologist and best-selling author, Dale will guide you through the Canadian Rocky Mountain National Parks. The story of the Rockies, its rivers and valleys, glaciers and hot springs, caves and karst, mountain building and erosion unfolds.

With eye-catching illustrations and photographs, this presentation blends story telling with science and natural beauty with easy to understand explanations. Be prepared to be amazed by the story written in the Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers. Dale’s book will be available for sale. You can pay with cash or credit card. The cost is $28.00 cash and Dale pays the GST. If a credit card is used, the cost is $27.95 plus GST.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

 

According to the latest DNA census in the province’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

 

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment & Parks (https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/)

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…The names may bring back happy memories growing up on the farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes; bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

10 Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle
  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake

 

For more information on these hikes, visit: https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

 

 

 

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW


 

 

 

 

….see you on the trails …

CM

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February 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Missed the January meeting at the Norseman Outdoor Specialists store?

Here are some highlights:

Roughly 25 members filled the Norseman store on a cold January night (Jan. 30) to learn about snowshoeing and the “true definition of winter” from Justin Howse, the store’s operations manager. We learned:

  • Winter conditions can exist even on a cold summer day (due to elements such as wind and rain). Always dress appropriately and be prepared for “winter-like” conditions.
  • Be aware of your surroundings when you are snowshoeing or x-c skiing (and make good decisions, such as not having lunch in an avalanche runoff zone or beneath a snow-covered slope).
  • In winter, have a wick-away layer next to your skin, followed by a warm layer (such as fleece), and a soft shell jacket on the top. For more warmth, add another layer to the “middle” layer, rather than put on a hard shell jacket that may be rain-proof but doesn’t breathe.
  • When going up and down hills on snowshoes, Justin suggests trying a “herringbone” technique when ascending, and a “snowplough” stance, similar to downhill skiing, when descending (being careful not to cross the tip of one snowshoe over the other).

Embracing an Unusual Winter with “CORE Enthusiasm”

Swishing along ski trails, gliding through snow laden forests, exploring pristine landscapes on snowshoes…CORE’s winter season has featured many well-attended trips, fabulous snow conditions (and, admittedly, a few frosty days)…. all mixed with lots of fun and adventure in the outdoors. Thanks to Cheryl, Lynn, Harvey, Carol, Mary, Pat, Julia Tsang, Katherine, Stu, John R., Anne-Marie, Julia Trangeled, David T., Edna, Cathie, Sarah, David M., and Pam for posting events and courses this winter. (Sorry if we missed anyone!)

 

Carpooling Contributions – A Suggestion from the Executive

CORE’s current carpool formula ($0.20 x total distance of trip divided by the number of people in the vehicle – including driver) was devised a number of years ago when gas prices were somewhat lower. With gas prices fluctuating like a yoyo and being fairly unpredictable in recent months, the executive would like to suggest the following:

If gas prices are higher than $1.15 at the time of a CORE trip, drivers can consider requesting a donation based on $0.25, rather than $0.20. (E.g., $0.25 x total distance of trip divided by the number of people in the vehicle). We will leave it up to the discretion of the drivers.

Interested in Volunteering for CORE?

There are many ways that members can contribute to CORE:

  • volunteer for the 2018-2019 executive (as a registered society we must fill four important positions: Chairperson, Secretary, Treasurer and Membership, or risk having to dissolve the club);
  • coordinate events (either in the city or in the mountains);
  • volunteer to give a presentation at a monthly meeting or suggest ideas for future presentations (send an email to mailbox@corehike.org);
  • nominate someone for the Chicken Mountain Award (send an email to mailbox@corehike.org);
  • make suggestions or comments via mailbox@corehike.org

CORE sponsored “Buy and Sell” Event

Watch for further details in next month’s newsletter about a “Buy and Sell” event that CORE’s executive committee is planning for the April 2018 meeting.

March’s Monthly Meeting

On March 27th, Dale Leckie, author of Rocks, Ridges and Rivers: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks, will give a slideshow on the geology of the Canadian Rockies, without referencing a lot of difficult-to-understand geological terms.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

January/February 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 18 – February 11. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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January 20 – Evan Thomas Creek snowshoe

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January 21 – Pristine scenery along Braille Trail

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January 27 – Lusk Creek snowshoers brave the cold

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January 27 – A wintery wonderland at Lake Louise

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January 28 – Boulton Bridge-Elk Pass-Fox Creek ski

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February 10 – Pat, Laz, and Susan – snowshoeing at Confederation Park

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February 10 – Happy skiers at Peter Lougheed Provincial Park

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February 11 – Is Geoff really up to his waist in snow?

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February 11 – Chris after a close encounter with the snow

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FEBRUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Members and Guests – Please join us at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Avenue S.W. Tuesday, February 27, 7:00 p.m.

A Tour of Ancients Civilizations by One of our Own “Ancients”

In 2017, Mike (a long-time CORE member) travelled to Egypt (March), Greece (July) and Cyprus (November). He will show some pyramids, sailing up the Nile, then move on to the Greek tour of Athens, Algina, Eleusis, Meteora, Delph, Corinth, Mycenae, Epidaurus, Hydra, Patmos, Ephesus (in Turkey), Samos and back to Athens. Finally, a brief visit to Cyprus – Kouklia and Paphos.

In the Greek part, Mike will talk about several of the ancient monuments (not including himself), Greek art, dancing, walking, food, drink, sunsets and cats (there are a lot of cats in Greece).

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

NON-CORE EVENT

Nikki Heim – March 15, 2018: Wolverine Populations in South-Central Alberta 

Join the Friends of Kananaskis as Nikki reveals when the fierce wolverine meets its match, providing a glimpse into factors influencing a declining population in Kananaskis Country.

University of Calgary – Science Theatres ST 135, 527 Campus Place NW

Time: 7:00pm – 8:00pm

General Admissions – $5 Suggested Donation – No Pre-Show Ticket Sales

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 A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

NON-CORE EVENT

Fundraiser Event – Great Divide Trail Association

– Mar 15

A journey of adventure, discovery & survival

An evening of stories with Brian Keating, as he takes the audience on a high energy adventure through some of the major mountain ranges of the world. Brian Keating is a regular on CBC Homestretch and was awarded the 2017 Stan Hodgkiss Canadian Outdoorsperson of the Year Award by the Canadian Wildlife Federation. Brian is a wildlife advocate, a pilot, scuba diver and mountaineer and has hiked, explored and advocated for wildlife across the globe, including Canada’s own Great Divide Trail.

All profits from the event will be invested in the completion and environmental protection of the Great Divide Trail.

Tickets:
Regular:  $30.00, Students:  $15.00

The Details:
When:  Thursday, March 15, 7:00 – 9:00pm, doors open at 6:30pm
Where:  John Dutton Theatre, 616 Macleod Trail Southeast, Calgary
How to Get a Ticket:  Click here:  Tickets available on eventbrite

Please share this info with others and help us spread the word about our event with Brian Keating!

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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JANUARY CORE NEWSLETTER

EXECUTIVE CORNER

January CORE Meeting Moved to Norseman Outdoor Specialists Shop

Due to renovations at Scarboro Community Hall, we were forced to find an alternative location. The Norseman Outdoor Specialists shop (formerly the Norseman Ski & Hike shop) came to our rescue and offered their store for the meeting. See further details below.

Cross Country Ski Lessons Deemed a Success

The executive would like to thank those members who participated in the subsidized x-c ski lessons on Jan. 7 and Jan. 14. Those who took the lessons all agreed that U of C Outdoor Centre instructor, Steven, was excellent and that they had learned some valuable skills for improving their skiing.

CORE Makes Donation to West Bragg Creek Greater Trails Association

Many CORE members enjoy x-c skiing and snowshoeing at West Bragg Creek during the winter, as well as hiking and biking there in the summer. The West Bragg Creek Greater Trails Association, which maintains and track sets the ski trails in this recreation area, recently expanded the parking lots and installed new washrooms and a warming hut. The association depends primarily on donations to maintain the ski trails in top condition. For these reasons, the executive has decided to donate $100 to the WBCGTA.

CORE Featured in 10hikes.com Calgary Hiking Clubs Blog

In late 2017, CORE was contacted by a fellow named Adam Hayman who writes for a website called 10hikes.com. He asked if he could interview one of our members to obtain information about the club so he could feature CORE in a section called Calgary Hiking Clubs.

CORE was selected as one of three local clubs featured in the blog. The other two were Slow and Steady and Fifth Dimension (a seniors club). To read what Adam wrote about CORE (and the other clubs), click on this link https://10hikes.com/calgary-hiking-clubs/

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November 2017 – January 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for November 26 to January 14. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

December 2 – Jeanette and Mary on Paint Pots Trail


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December 9 – Hard to believe this is a winter hike – Nose Hill

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November 26 – Taking a Break on Tunnel Mountain

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November 26 – Hanging out at the Banff Centre after Tunnel Mountain

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December 17 – Marushka Lake group

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December 17 – Harvey and Laura – Marushka Lake hike

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December 16 – Pat, the Famous Ice Climber

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December 16 – Guess Who?

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December 24 – A Beautiful Day near Lower Kananaskis Lake

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January 7 – Mila, Pat and Laura – CORE Ski Lesson

 

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January 3 – Logger’s Loop Group Photo

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January 13 – Cathy and David ready to Skate

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January 13 – Group looking energetic before challenging ski to Lookout

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January 14 – Julia, Carol, Dave, Anne-Marie, Noreen and Bob – Ski Lesson

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JANUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Norseman Outdoor Specialists Store

4655 – 37 Street S.W. (Park in shopping mall across street but need to register your vehicle’s licence  number in the machine; or park on the street)

TUESDAY, January 30, 2018, 7:00 pm

Members and Guests: Please join us for our January meeting at the Norseman Outdoor Specialists shop.

Our presentation will be:

Winter Safety and Snowshoeing Skills

Snowshoeing is a wonderful winter activity that can, at times, be underestimated when it comes to safety. Justin Howse – a certified hiking guide – will be discussing the common issues and fitting troubles with snowshoes, along with skills and techniques to make snowshoeing more enjoyable. He will also be covering winter safety related to snowshoeing in the Rockies. Understanding what avalanche terrain looks like, what “Winter” actually is, along with equipment to consider for snowshoe travel will be discussed.

Justin is an instructor with the Outdoor Council of Canada, and a professional with the Interpretive Guides Association. He is also experienced as a wilderness first responder and has wilderness survival training. He is currently the operations manager at Norseman Outdoor Specialists.  

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Annual Christmas Bird Counts Originally Started for a “Sinister” Reason

Did you know that Christmas bird counts are done throughout North America and in some tropical areas in Central America, northern South America, the Caribbean and the Pacific Islands? The activity began well over a century ago in the U.S. as a protest of an existing Christmas tradition in which teams competed to see who could shoot the most birds and other animals in one day.

Friends of Kananaskis Speaker Series

University of Calgary – Science Theatres ST 135

527 Campus Place NW

Time: 7:00pm – 8:00pm

General Admissions – $5 Suggested Donation – No Pre-Show Ticket Sales

Megan Evans – January 25, 2018: The Buzz About Native Bees

Did you know there are over 300 species of native bees in Alberta? Come learn all about the different bees, how and where they live and what you can do to help promote native bees in your own backyard

Christian Stenner – February 15, 2018: The Caves of Kananaskis and Beyond

Christian will discuss the captivating pursuit of cave exploration and some of his international expeditions and contribution to scientific research along the way.

Nikki Heim – March 15, 2018: Wolverine Populations in South-Central Alberta 

Join the Friends of Kananaskis as Nikki reveals when the fierce wolverine meet its match, providing a glimpse into factors influencing a declining population in Kananaskis Country.

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 A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Free National Park Passes in 2017 Hailed as a Success by Parks Canada

An excerpt from the Banff Crag & Canyon Newspaper

The popular year-long program allowing visitors to enter Banff National Park for free has earned more than a passing grade from Parks Canada.

“Initial worries that the free entry promotion would result in massive overcrowding – with resulting damage to both the natural habitat and wildlife – proved groundless thanks to a carefully planned focus on urging visitors to use public transit much more than in previous years,” according to Banff National Parks visitor experience manager, Greg Danchuk.

“We feel 2017 was a great success here in Banff National Park.”

According to Danchuk, there was a weekend transit service from Calgary that carried 11,000 people to the park during just 27 days of service – that’s a lot of cars not on the road. Once people arrived, regular shuttle services provided a way to get around Banff town site or to travel to Lake Louise.

Parks Canada is now looking at future options, but say that they have learned a lot this year and that the experience in 2017 should help make things better in the future when it comes to moving people from Calgary to Banff.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Cave and Basin book offers context, clarity on history of Banff hot springs

Banff historian, E.J. (Ted) Hart has written a new book called Cave and Basin: Banff’s hot springs and the birth of Canada’s national parks. While relatively brief at 96 pages, Hart’s book is welcome as it is the authoritative record of the hot springs. Hart has pulled together a remarkable amount of detail on a subject that has been shoved on the sidelines for many years.

He begins his story with the Indigenous people of the Rocky Mountains and southern Alberta, placing their story into the context of the hot springs. Surprisingly, the first non-Indigenous person to make note of the springs was explorer James Hector, according to Hart. After Hector, the next people to come across the springs were prospectors Joe Healy (Healy Pass) in 1873 and Willard Burrell Younge in 1875.

By the time, railway workers, Frank McCabe and brothers, Tom and William McCardell discovered the hot springs in the fall of 1883, the hot springs had already been “discovered” at least three times, if not more, says author Hart.

The book is published by Banff-based Summerthought.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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November CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Mountain Equipment Co-0p Discount Night for CORE members 

Thursday, November 23, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Start your Christmas Shopping Early!

Please bring your CORE membership card to MEC (830 – 10 Avenue S.W.) to receive a wristband and be eligible for a 10% discount on all your purchases that evening.  At 7:30, there will be a short winter layering and clothing demonstration.  Coordinators for the evening are David and Edna. If you have any questions, please consult the CORE calendar for their contact information.

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Peterman Fund X-Country Ski Lessons 

The executive is arranging for X-C ski lessons for CORE members in January. This training will be partially paid for by the Branko Peterman Endowment Fund. Please watch the CORE calendar for details.

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Getting Ready for Winter Adventures

The club is currently gearing up for a winter season of snowshoeing, x-country skiing and hopefully downhill skiing. In the next few days more trips will be added to the calendar, but members are invited and encouraged to post additional events, outings and activities for CORE. Please contact Pat, our Executive Trip Coordinator, if you have any questions about coordinating or if you would like to co-coordinate with an experienced coordinator. Her email address is listed on the Executive Contact page; click on the Resources tab on the website (second item from the bottom on the drop down menu).

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UPDATE: December 1- 3 Annual Christmas Weekend at Castle Mountain Chalets

With the holiday season approaching, so is our annual Christmas weekend at Castle Mountain chalets, December 1st to 3rd. There are already 16 of us signed up. There is both a snowshoe and a cross-country ski outing scheduled for each day. We will do appetizers on Friday evening around 7:00 p.m. in the adjacent chalets and our traditional potluck is scheduled for Saturday evening. People coming for the day from Calgary are welcome to join in. The four rooms in the adjacent chalets are taken, so new reservations should be made directly with Castle Mountain chalets. Do not forget to mention the 20% discount for CORE members. Looking forward to a great weekend.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October/November 2017

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for October 22 to November 12. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

October 22 – Canoe Meadows to Widow Maker hike

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October 28 – Terrace Trail South

 

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October 31 – Hallowe’en Pumpkin Creations

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November 5 – Winter hiking at Glenbow Ranch

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November 11 – Johnston Canyon Upper Falls

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November 11 – Chicken Checking Trail Sign

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November 12 – Hiking the Friendship Trail

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NOVEMBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY, November 28, 2017, 7:00 pm

Annual Christmas Meeting and Party

All members are invited to our Annual Christmas Meeting and Party, our final meeting for 2017. The evening will begin with a special program — a slideshow of winter activities from the past few years followed by “CORE’s Got Talent,” featuring a performance by the talented CORE executive.

You’ll be invited to reveal your talents during a Christmas quiz (and perhaps win a prize). The night will end with a Christmas fete (a delectable buffet, ample Christmas cheer and festive music) to put everyone in the Christmas mood. This year, we’ll be serving drinks and munchies during our official program, after which the full buffet and social festivities will begin.

We are hoping for as many members as possible to come together for our last social of the year to celebrate the Christmas season and mingle with your fellow hikers, so be sure to come along and join in the fun.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Raccoon-spotting in Banff – a Rare Thing, Indeed!

Raccoon eating corn

Did you know that raccoons are not normally seen in Banff National Park? This fall a raccoon was spotted in the Banff townsite which prompted Parks Canada to begin tracking the animal on remote cameras. The problem, according to Parks Canada, is that the raccoon is not a native species in Banff and could cause damage to the ecosystem. Raccoons are normally found in southwestern Alberta. According to Alberta Fish and Wildlife, in the wild raccoons feed on fruits, nuts, berries and insects, and foods that can be found near water such as fish, birds, eggs and frogs. They are omnivores that can easily adapt to whatever food sources are available

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Another Year Older

This month CORE turns 18, a mere teenager in comparison to other clubs that have been around for a number of decades, such as the Calgary Ski Club, the Rocky Mountain Ramblers and the Calgary Weekend Hikers.

Since 1999, CORE has had it share of growing pains, as it evolved from its infancy into an adolescent. Some of the attributes that have kept CORE going are: dedicated coordinators, friendships that have developed, the adventures that have nourished our spirits, and the sense of community and commonality that comes from spending time in nature. Let’s hope that we can grow strong and tall as we approach adulthood in two years. And still be going strong when we turn 30.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Will 2017-2018 be a “La Nina” year?

La Niña means The Little Girl in Spanish. La Niña is also sometimes called El Viejoanti-El Niño, or simply “a cold event.

The impacts of La Niña on the global climate tend to be opposite those of El Niño. During a La Niña year, winter temperatures are warmer than normal in the southeast and cooler than normal in the northwest. La Niña usually brings colder winters to the Canadian west and Alaska, and drier, warmer weather to the American southeast.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists are “predicting” that a La Niña will form this winter, but this is not a certainty. Right now, they’re saying there’s a 55-65 percent chance. For it to officially be a La Niña year, the sea surface temperature needs to hold at least 0.5 degrees below average for three months.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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