February/March 2021 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

MEMBERS MEETING MARCH 30, 2021 FROM 6.45pm to 8.15pm (via zoom)

CORE’S FIRST OUTDOOR ADVENTURE FILM FEST

Join our first Outdoor Adventure Film Fest via Zoom. Five short films, of varying lengths, will be shown. Loved by All – The Story of Apa Sherpa(14 min.), The life of one Sherpa on Mount Everest.  Beneath the Ice (16 min.), Canadian Will Gadd is the first to explore beneath a glacier in Greenland.  Blood on the Crack (10 min.), One of the most excruciating rock climbs in the World, renowned for reducing fingertips to shreds.  Circle of the Sun (5 min.), Stunning scenery and adventure in the Arctic.  Mirna Valerio – Par for the Course (4 min.), Inspirational film when we feel we can’t go on… Grab your own liquid cheer and join us for a bit of socializing and adventure….until we can meet again in person. You must register for this event, as we will need to send you the Zoom link via email. Please go to the CORE CALENDAR to sign up. You must be signed up by 9.00 pm on March 29th.

                                                                                                                 


                                                                 

 

 

 

Prepared???

Hiking Apps – Something for Everyone

Ever wondered when technology would reach the backcountry? The good news: it already has. There are plenty of apps and hiking companions that offer navigation and guidance without the need to be connected to WiFi.  Click here for a comprehensive guide.

 

 

 

 

To All CORE Outdoor Event Participants:

Social (Physical) Distancing for COVID 19

The club executive recently met (virtually of course) and talked about the current COVID-19 situation in Alberta. The second wave we are in now has been far worse than the first wave, and more seriously. The highly contagious U.K. and South Africa variants have also reached Alberta, albeit presently in small numbers.

All of this makes us now believe it would be prudent to put a stronger emphasis on physical distancing for the next few months at least. We are therefore requesting all trip participants to make a more concerted and conscious effort to physical distance from others, while xc skiing, snowshoeing or winter walking (and especially in the parking lots before – and after – the trips).

Thank you for helping us to keep our club members safe.  

The CORE Executive.

 

 CORE’s new meeting Facility is Bow Waters Canoe Club

Bow Waters Canoe Club is located just off Deerfoot Trail and 17th Ave SE.  Address of the facility is 1975 – 26th Street SE.

Bow Waters Canoe Club map

 

 

 

 

 

Directions:

From East or Westbound 17th Ave SE (see map below states 1A, which is 17th Ave)

Turn South on 26th Street SE (there is a set of lights at this intersection),

BWCC Road turnoff

Ensure you are in the right hand lane and immediately turn right where the City of Calgary Utilities/Electrical station is (it is a small black building with LED lights on it, indicated by the red arrow below).

Follow the road down to the parking lot. Take the stairs down to the club house building.

 

 

CORE, ACTIVITIES/EVENTS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC:

CORE executive has put in place guidelines and recommendations for trip coordinators, and COVID-19 guidelines for keeping members safe, when participating in CORE activities/events. CORE executive would like to thank all CORE members that put on hikes, bike rides, urban walk’s for their club members during this unprecedented time.

Winter/Spring is now with us. Many more activities are planned for the coming months. Continue to watch your emails and CORE calendar for activities/events. Since restarting the club on June 15th, 2020 CORE has put on many activities/events. Have a look at the Activity Scoreboard below and/or go to CORE photo album .

Members are encouraged to read the Guidelines “Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19 pandemic.”

If the province of Alberta mandates different requirements, the organization may have to make appropriate changes.  If the situation changes a newsletter with the updated information will be sent to the members.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos:

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

Highlights of Activities/Events

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar of hikes from January 13 to March 14, 2021.  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent and past activities.

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January 13 2021 WBC XC Ski Iron Springs Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 14 2021 Elk Pass Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 17 2021 XC Ski West Spray River Loop Trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 20 2021 XC Ski Bouton Creek Whisky Jack Pocaterra Packers Loop PLPP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 23 2021 XC Ski PLPP Marl Lake Circuit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 24 2021 Stoney Squaw Mtn Snowhoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 30 2021 East Douglas Fir Trail Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 30 2021 XC Ski Cascade Fie Road Banff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 31 2021 Chester Lake Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 17 2021 Sandy McNabb XC Ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 19 2021 WBC XC Ski Moose Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 21 2021 Grotto Canyon Winter Ice Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 24 2021 XC Ski Whisky Jack Tyrwhitt Elk Pass Fox Creek Morain Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 28 2021 High Rocky Trail Winter Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 5 2021 XC Ski Whisky Jack Pocaterra Lynx Amos Wheeler Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 7 2021 Ribbon Creek and Kovach Trail Winter Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 12 2021 Cascade Ponds to Johnson Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 14 2021 Lower Kananaskis Lake Winter Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News and Notes

Fines for Illegally Parking on Hwy #1A

Parking signs along Hwy #1 Caught fined $162 dollars

Canmore RCMP stated ” that anyone parking illegally on Highway 1A near Canmore and Alberta Parks or other outdoor recreational amenities will receive a $162 dollar ticket in the mail. That means anyone parking along the shoulder or in a ditch in either direction along the highway. And there is signage along the highway stating parking along the highway is prohibited.” Highway Rules and road Regulations states “That vehicles shall not park on the roadway, parking lane or shoulder of a provincial highway.”

There has been a secondary problem. People park on the shoulder of the highway and then stand around their vehicles with doors open and walking on the highway to access the recreation areas. This is causing collisions and a number of near misses by drivers slowing quickly and performing U-turns in the middle of the highway to park.

 

 Banff Records a M3.9 Earthquake

Cascade Mtn epi centre of Earthquake

Taimi Mulder, an earthquake seismologist with the Geological Survey of Canada, confirmed an earthquake struck six kilometres north of Banff town, near Cascade Mountain, at 6.33pm MT and was recorded as a 3.9 magnitude earthquake.

The United States Geological Survey initially reported the earthquake as a 4.4 magnitude. Mulder stated “that Canada uses a different subset of stations that are closer to the town, providing more accurate information.”

The earthquake depth was around 17.3 kilometres, plus or minus 7 kilometres, the USGS tracking website stated.

There has been smaller earthquakes recorded in Banff area in the last 10 years. The largest was a magnitude of 6 dating back to 1918. An earthquake magnitude of 2.5 to 5.4 is often felt but causes only minor damage.

Per Alberta Energy Regulator, earthquakes happen frequently in Alberta. Majority are in the Foothills and the Rocky Mountains. These earthquakes occur within the thrust fault systems that occurred millions of years ago, with the mountain building processes that created the Rocky Mountains. There are clusters of earthquakes detected east of the Rocky Mountain deformation belt. The clusters are the Rocky Mountain House Seism Genic Zone – 30 kms southwest of Rocky Mountain House, the Brazeau River Cluster – 90kms northwest of Rocky Mountain House, the Cardston Earthquake Swarm – 13 kms north of Cardston, and the Crooked Lake Sequences – approx 30 kms west of Fox Creek (northeast of Edmonton).

There has been activity in Kananaskis Country, Banff and Jasper on a more minor scale.

 

 

Alberta to Expand World’s largest stretch of Boreal Forest Reserve

Kitaskino Nuwenene Wildland Park is south of Wood Buffalo National Park

Environment Minister Jason Nixon stated “The Province wants to protect more than 1400 square kilometres of forest and wetland to bring the total area conserved to over 68,000 square kilometers. The plan would be an expansion of the Kitaskino Nuwenene Wildland Park. The area is just south of Wood Buffalo National Park. It connects Ktaskino Nuwenene with Birch Hills Wildland Park. ” Which was created by the NDP gov’t.

Chief Peter Powder stated “this is an important area, headwaters that support the Peace Athabasca Delta, an area that supports traditional resources. This expansion would protect land and water for traditional use.”

This park was made possible by the surrender of industrial dispositions on the land from two oil companies.

It is the second announcement protecting stretches of northern Alberta’s forests. The first was an area near the Fort McKay Nation that supports traditional land uses and maintains ecological integrity. The Alberta Court of Appeal overturned regulatory approvals for a $440 million oilsands project that would have encroached on land the First Nation considers sacred.

Alberta’s Government to Reinstate 1976 Coal Mining Policy

Coal Mining in the Elkford Valley BC

After public backlash the Alberta Government says it will reinstate the 1976 coal policy, it revoked last spring. Engery Minister Sonya Savage stated “they will reinstate the 4 coal categories which dictated where and how coal leasing, exploration and development could occur. And the minister has directed the Alberta Energy Regulator no mountaintop removal will be permitted and all of the restrictions under the 1976 coal categories are to apply, including all restrictions on surface mining in Category 2 lands.”

Category 2 lands include parts of the southern Rocky Mountains and the foothills. All future coal exploration approvals on Category 2 lands will be prohibited pending widespread consultations on a new coal policy, per the Engery Minister.

The decision to reinstate the full 1976 coal policy was due to Albertans speaking out and legally challenging the government on this issue.

Energy Minister also stated “the gov’t will not only reinstate the full 1976 coal policy, the gov’t will implement further protections and consult with Albertans on a new modern coal policy.” The 1976 Coal Policy blocked surface coal mines in about 1.4 million hectares of wilderness that is home to endangered species and the head waters of rivers that many people depend on in southern Alberta.

Sonja Savage stated “there are currently 6 coal projects being explored on Category 2 lands, 4 of which began exploration under the 1976 coal policy. Two applications were approved after the 1976 coal policy was rescinded. The gov’t does not intend to remove approvals that were granted by the Alberta Engery Regulator.” The 6 approved coal projects have already begun drilling and road-building under their permits. In Sonya Savage’s message on Feb 8th, 2021, she did not say there will be NO surface mining in the eastern slopes.

The provincial government will hold public consultation for future coal mining with Albertans. The consultations are to start March 28th, 2021. These public consultations are an important step, as it will show how transparent the gov’t is on the subject.

West Bragg Creek Trails

Bragg Creek Trails

Have you ever been to West Bragg Creek Provincial Park to hike, ski, snowshoe, bike or run?

Do you know all the trail maintenance is done by volunteer’s?   These volunteers are a community group who work hard to ensure this area is accessible for everyone. There is still a huge annual cost to build and maintain these trails. Last year it cost WBC trail organization close to $500,000 thousand dollars. And it is almost entirely supported by donations.

Bragg Creek Trails is the trade name of The Greater Bragg Creek Trails Association and is a registered Canadian charity. Charitable receipts are issued for amounts over $20.00 dollars.

There are many ways to donate:

  1. Online at Bragg Creek Trails Organization.
  2. Download the donation from from the website and send a cheque to GBC Trail Association (address is online).
  3. You can do a cash deposit at one of the three donation boxes at the West Bragg Creek parking lot.

 

Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There have been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Adventure Stories

 

Quote by Aristotle

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

A reminder of every member’s responsibility to keeping yourself and your fellow hikers safe, during this unprecedented time.

Six feet/two metres Social Distancing requirement by AHS and CORE guidelines

Every member in this photo is a minimum of six (6) feet/two (2) metres apart, for social distancing guidelines.

Reminders:

Bring a mask in case you cannot social distance – 6 feet/2 metres, or you need to go into an indoor area.

Stay six feet/2 metres for social distancing when hiking and other events. Also, at rest breaks and lunch.

Remember, This Too Shall Pass!!

 

 

Avalanche Season

Avalanche Awareness

Avalanche conditions have been heighten in the last couple of weeks due to weather conditions. It does not matter what activitity you are doing in the backcountry. As Most avalanches are triggered by humans.

Recognize Avalanche Terrain:

  • You need a steep slope, avalanches normally occur on slopes between 30 and 45 degrees.
  • Convex rolls are prime trigger points but you can also be at risk below these slopes.
  • Cornices and Wind slabs build up on downwind (lee) slopes.
  • Slide paths are open areas on a forested slope, cleared of trees by repeated avalanches.

If you are on or below slopes like these, you are in avalanche terrain.

Continuously look up and check conditions. Even if you are not on a slope, many trails travel through terrain threatened by avalanches from above.

 

Recognize Unstable Conditions:

  • Heavy Snowfall – Approximately 30 cm or more of new snow over 48 hours. Less if snow is being blown by the wind.

  • Wind – Wind slabs form on the downwind (lee) side of the ridge. If there has been recent drifting, there are probably wind slabs.

  • Warming – Strong sunshine, warm temperatures, rain can destabilize the snow.

If you hear a WHUMPF!, This sound is a warning that weak layers are collapsing in the snowpack.

If you see any of these signs, it means you are in avalanche terrain.

Check Avalanche Canada website for the danger level in the area before you venture out.

 

Have Fun and Stay Safe!