March 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

March 26, 2019 Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for February’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

March 26 Presentation: Discover Parks – presented by CPAWS – Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Learn about Alberta’s amazing parks from a user and conservation perspective. Discover the fascinating history and purpose of our parks through bio-facts, pictures, case studies and stories. There is a myriad of reasons for protecting nature through the creation of parks. CPAWS will, also, discuss how climate change is affecting our parks, ecosystems and species.

CPAWS (Southern branch) works with Albertans to establish and protect parks and wilderness areas from Red Deer south to the Alberta border, including Kananaskis, Castle and Bighorn.

Coordinator’s Meeting for Summer Events  – April 23

Calling all hikers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, scramblers,camping even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you. Mike has many guide books, maps, computers to help navigate any unknown routes. This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.

The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on April 23, 2019, at 7 pm at his home. For more information go to CORE Calendar. And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities

Wilderness First Aid Course Scheduled for April 27

CORE is sponsoring a “Non Certified” Wilderness First Aid training course on April 27, 2019, at Bragg Creek Community Centre – 23 White Ave. Cost is $15.00 dollars per person. Nicole Elder is the instructor. She provides first aid instruction to the Calgary Police Service members. She has extensive training and expertise and experience in Wilderness First Aid, Survival Training and Search and Rescue. There will be classroom training and outdoor scenario’s. After scenario training there will be general survival techniques. Dress for the weather as some instruction is outside. Course is limited to 24 participants. There will be a wait list so anyone unable to attend is asked to contact the coordinator as soon as possible. There will be an “option” for members to buy a wilderness first aid manual at a cost of $45.00 dollars each. You can register online, on the CORE Website Activities page. A non-refundable $15.00 dollars is requested and can be paid online via PayPal, cash or cheque is acceptable if received prior to registration deadline. Final day for course registration is April 22, 2019. Non-members need to first join CORE ($15.00 Winter/Spring membership) and then can participate in the course.   For more contact information, go to the CORE calendar for April 27, 2019.

May 13 – Deadline – For Chicken Mountain Award

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have to May 13 to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org . At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee will be chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of the trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

2019 – 2020 CORE Executive Election May 28

We should all give thanks to our CORE executive, for their time and energy they put in to running the club. At the annual general meeting on May 28, 2019 CORE members will be electing their executive. If you are interested in participating in running the club and would like some further information about joining the executive, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to Mike.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

February and March 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 19 to February 19, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

Due to extreme cold weather, in February, many events scheduled for these weekends were cancelled or postponed to future dates.

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February 23 XC Ski WBC Hostel Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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February 28 WBC Iron Springs XC Ski Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 7 WBC Moose Loop XC Ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 9 PLPP XC Ski Marl Lake Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 9 Ranger Ridge Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 16 Grotto Mountain Ice Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 16 XC Ski Boulton-Whiskey Jack – Packers Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Cougar Warning still in effect for all areas surrounding the Town of Banff

Cougars have been frequenting the areas around the Town of Banff in search of food. Report all sightings immediately to Banff Park Dispatch at 403-762-1470.  Go to Wild Smart on “How to Avoid Cougar Encounters, Handling a Cougar Encounter and Handling a Cougar Attack.”

Greater Bragg Creek Trail Conditions :  

Are very good for Snowshoeing, Hiking and Cross Country Skiing. For more information go to Bragg Creek Trails.

Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park Trail Conditions:

All trails east of the Quarry area are currently closed due to winter conditions. Trail closures are handled by Alberta Parks. For more information go to Alberta Parks Glenbow Ranch.

Mountain Pine Beetle Larvae may be reduced by 90% due to Alberta’s Cold Snap

We may not be able to enjoy our outdoor events, due to this cold snap, but these frigid temperatures is helping to kill the Mountain Pine Beetle. Especially in Jasper Provincial Park where the outbreak is the worse. Alberta has been experiencing an outbreak since 2006, the last three to four years Jasper has been hit hard. The outbreak started in B.C. in 1999. More than 19 million hectares of forest have been destroyed by the beetle.

Beetle larvae are equipped to handle the cold weather up to a certain extent, tucked under pine tree bark. Starting in autumn the beetle manufactures a compound that protects against the cold up to a certain degree and length of time. As the temperature keeps dropping below a certain point, more die. Basically the colder it gets, the more pine beetles die.

Researches at U of A are seeing a decline as much as 90% of larvae killed this winter so far. With the population declining this will help the provincial government with its control tactic’s.  Province of Alberta has been handling the outbreak by doing aerial surveys of forested areas, identifying affected trees on digital maps and sending crews to find that tree, confirm its attach, fall the tree and immediately burn it. Then the crews inspect other trees in the surrounding area to see if they have been affected and carry out the same practice.

The outbreak in Jasper National Park is under the federal jurisdiction hasn’t been the same response. The severity of the outbreak within the park boundary means officials cannot take the same control measures as there is too many beetles. Later this year, Parks Canada has proposed to burn these areas. Which will leave large areas of land, treeless.

U of A is also researching to whether the mountain pine beetle is becoming more tolerant to the cold as they are found in colder, northern climates.

River Otters sighted near Edworthy Park

When hiking down the Bow River near Calgary’s Edworthy Park, you may see Two River Otters out on the ice!!

Two River Otters were sighted on the Bow River near Calgary’s Edworthy Park on February 22, 2019. These sightings were confirmed by wildlife expert Chris Fisher. River otter sightings have been rare in recent years in the Calgary area. The presence of river otters in Calgary area is a good indication of the health of the Bow River and the fish population and the surrounding environment is in good shape. The otters feed on a variety of fish in the Bow and not pose a threat to the river’s trout population. With the arrival of spring they will move into treed areas west of Calgary.

Area in Upper Kananaskis Lake closed to Grizzly Bear Siting

On February 18, 2019, cross country skiers were travelling in the area south of Upper Kananaskis Lake when they came to close to a bear den and woke a grizzly bear. The bear came out of its den and came within one meter of the skiers before the bear took off. A bear closure has been issued in the area following the encounter, which will remain in effect until the end of denning season which is usually early May, to give the bear and any others, its space.

There is no way to identify a bear’s den during winter, as there are many different kinds and they’re often buried in snow. You need to be prepared for a bear and be aware it could happen.  A grizzly bear when it hibernates, their body temperature only drops a little bit, compare to other hibernators, therefore, they are easier to awake and they can respond to anything that they perceive as danger to them.

You should carry bear spray in cold weather. Extreme cold weather may have negative impacts on the effectiveness of bear spray, including that it may not spray as far when used. You should carry the cannisters inside you coat to keep it warm. This will impact a person’s response time, but the bear spray will be more effective. Rules for going out in the front or back country are the same in winter, travel in groups, stick together, make noise, be aware of what’s going on around you.

Beware of Grizzly Presence from 1A entrance west of Banff to Johnston Canyon

Parks Canada is worried spilled grain from a derailed train in Banff National Park will attract hungry grizzly bears to the tracks as they emerge from hibernation in the coming weeks. Twenty railcars from a Canadian Pacific Railway freight train went off the tracks on February 28 west of the Town of Banff. Ten of the derailed cars contained grain, including canola that spilled. Parks Canada says the spilled grain will need to be removed quickly and thoroughly. Parks also stated the spill site will need to be cordoned off with electric fencing to keep wildlife away. The spill occurred between the entrance of 1A west of Banff to Johnston Canyon.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

Friends of Fish Creek Speaker Series

Calgary Captured – Urban Wildlife Film: March 21, 2019, presented by Vanessa Carney, Calgary Parks, The City of Calgary, Need to register thru Eventbrite.

Call of the Wetland: Combining science, nature and community for the health of Calgary’s wetlands. April 18, 2019, presented by Nicole Kahal, Conservation Analyst, Miistakis Institute, Need to register thru Eventbrite.

 The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System is now in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. Rogers Pass in Glacier National Park is a popular backcountry ski touring destination. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need an annual winter pass if you plan to go into the Winter Restricted Areas. The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into three areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter, you need a national pass
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking quote by Mary Davis

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Animal Tracks

Do You Know Who is Following You, or Who you are Tracking??

Identifying tracks to the species level you need to look for certain clues. You usually do not get a full clear track (like toe or nail marks). You need to look for two clues: 1. The Track Pattern of the animal and 2. The overall trail width that the pattern makes. 

Track Patterns

Pattern:  There is a distinct pattern that species use most of the time. It is useful to group animals by their regular walking pattern. There are four basic patterns: 1. Pace  2. Diagonal  3. Bound  4. Gallop.

  • Pace Pattern:  Type of animal that uses this style of walking is the wide-bodied, slow moving types such as beaver, bear, racoon, porcupine. These animals seem to waddle along their wide bodies shifting from side to side. The legs on one side of the body seem to move together, followed by the slumbering of the two legs on the other side. Most of the animals in this category have large, soft, padded feet. These soft padded feet allow them to walk through the woods quietly. The rear feet of these animals are elongated with a long and narrow heel.

Diagonal Pattern:  Type of animals are deer, moose, caribou, elk, fox, wolf, coyote, bobcat and dog. You need to imagine a center line with foot tracks diagonally crossing over it to form the pattern. The rear right foot lands on top of but slightly behind where the front foot right foot was a moment earlier. The front feet of the diagonal walkers are considerably larger than their rear feet. All cats and foxes use the diagonal pattern but the rear foot lands directly on top of the front track. All cats walk with their claws retracted, so the claws do not show in the track. Deer and moose have heart-shaped tracks, the dog family has egg shaped tracks and the fox and cat families have round tracks.

 Bound Pattern:  Includes the weasel family, fisher, mink, otter and marten. These animals have long bodies and short legs. Look for five toes. As they move, the front two feet land first, followed by the rear two feet that land just behind the front. Some overlapping of the tracks may take place.

Gallop Pattern:  Includes the small critters, like squirrels, chipmunks and larger animals like rabbits and hares. This group moves quickly through the forest floor. Their track pattern shows the front feet landing closely together and the rear feet coming around the outside and past where the front feet landed.

Trail Widths

After examining the trail pattern, you now need to measure the trail width. This will narrow the animal to the species level (the chipmunk from the squirrels, the fox from the coyote). Trail widths are measured in various ways based on the walking pattern used. See the track pattern diagram for the proper measuring of trail widths. Below a few examples:

  • Diagonal Walkers: Bobcat 7 to 10 cm, Red Fox 10 cm, Coyote 12.5 cm, Deer 16 to 20 cm
  • Bounders: Mink 7.5 cm, short tail weasel 5 to 6 cm, Long tail weasel 7 cm, Fisher 12.5 cm
  • Gallopers: Chipmunk 5 cm, Red Squirrel 10 cm, Rabbits 12.5 cm, Hares 15 cm

Dominance: 90 per cent of mammals are right dominant. With the gallopers or other animals when their speed or gait increase to a gallop, their right foot lands first. Dominance will also state which way an animal will circle or turn.

There are many good animal tracking books online and thru the Calgary Public Library.

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….see you on the trails …

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February 2019 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

February 2019 Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for February’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

February 26 Presentation – Colorado River Trip by Core Member Jeanette

Boats at the ready

Join us for a presentation by Jeanette will show us a trip taken by Jeanette, Lynn, Geoff, Laurie and Chad’s (CORE members)  17-day, 225 mile Dory trip down the Colorado River from Lees Ferry to Diamond Creek through the Grand Canyon. Come see the spectacular scenery of the Marble Canyon, Inner George, fantastic side hikes and indigenous ruins, crystalline creeks and waterfalls, cactus gardens, white water, foaming ripples and Lava Falls along with 42 spectacular rapids.

Wilderness First Aid Course Scheduled for April 27

CORE is sponsoring a “Non Certified” Wilderness First Aid training course on April 27, 2019, at Bragg Creek Community Centre – 23 White Ave. Cost is $15.00 dollars per person. Nicole Elder is the instructor. She provides first aid instruction to the Calgary Police Service members. She has extensive training and expertise and experience in Wilderness First Aid, Survival Training and Search and Rescue. There will be classroom training and outdoor scenario’s. After scenario training there will be general survival techniques. Dress for the weather as some instruction is outside. Course is limited to 24 participants. There will be a wait list so anyone unable to attend is asked to contact the coordinator as soon as possible. There will be an “option” for members to buy a wilderness first aid manual at a cost of $45.00 dollars each. You can register online, on the CORE Website Activities page. A non-refundable $15.00 dollars is requested and can be paid online via PayPal, cash or cheque is acceptable if received prior to registration deadline.  For more contact information, go to the CORE calendar for April 27.

Note: Club members intending to register should do so by mid-March to assist in the planning for the course.

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to Mike.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

January and February 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 19 to February 19, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

Due to extreme cold weather, in February many events scheduled for these weekends were cancelled or postponed to future dates.

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January 19 Fox Creek  and Elk Pass XC Ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 19 1st CORE night XC ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 20 Rawson Lake Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Unofficial Trail in “Secret Cave” area of Johnston Canyon closed by Parks Canada to protect Unique Birds

There used to be up to 15 nesting pairs of Black Swifts in Johnston Canyon, but as of August 17, 2018 there is just one or two.  The Conservation Manager believes there was a single fledgling that survived in 2017. In an effort to entice the unique bird population back to Johnston Canyon in Banff National Park they have closed a popular, unofficial trail. This area is known to locals as the “secret cave”.

Black Swifts are mostly found in coastal regions but also nest in canyon habitat in the mountains. These birds lay one egg at a time, typically in May. It takes nearly a month for the egg to hatch, then unlike most other birds, the young do not grow feathers needed for flying for another two months.  Johnston Canyon is the only nesting site for black swifts in Alberta. The main trail is not affected by the closure, only the unofficial – off trail (this trail leads down into the canyon by the water) is closed. Closure is too November 15, 2018 and could be in place next year. Parks does not want to affect ice climbing in the winter months, and by then the birds are gone. If anyone is caught in this area, they will be fined by Parks Canada.

Canada concerned about U.S. plans to drill in Caribou refuge

The Canadian government, two territories and several First Nations are expressing concerns to the United States over plans to open the calving grounds of a large cross-border caribou herd to energy drilling, despite international agreements to protect it. Environment Canada has sent a letter to the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, stating the potential trans-boundary impacts of oil and gas exploration and development planned for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain. As most of the wildlife that inhabits this refuge is shared with Canada. The Porcupine herd is one of the few remaining healthy caribou populations in the North. A small population of this herd migrates to Jasper National Park then returns to the North prior to calving season. The Porcupine herd in this refuge numbers 218,000 and is growing. Canada wants assurances from the U.S. about the content of the environment study.

Adult caribou can co-exist with development, but they avoid any disturbance on their calving grounds. Canada is concerned that oil and gas exploration and development will negatively affect the long-term reproductive success of the Porcupine caribou herd. And the U.S. is aware of this possibility.

Parks Canada stops plans to build a Parkway Bike Trail between Banff and Jasper Nat’l Park

Park Canada says it will not go ahead with a plan to build a bike trail along the Icefields Parkway that runs through Banff and Jasper National Park. The federal agency had budgeted about $86 ($66 million for the bike pathway, $20 million for parking lots, campsites and washrooms) for the 107 kilometer cycling route from the Jasper townsite to the Columbia Icefields that could eventually extend to Banff townsite. Per Jason Bouzanis, director of communications for Parks Canada, “Ecological integrity is a primary focus for Parks Canada in the management of the national parks, and this is the main reason the bike path is not being built.”  The Icefields Parkway is considered a classic cycling tour, but riders are restricted to its narrow shoulder. Parks Canada had proposed a separate, paved route buffered from the busy road by 10 to 20 metres of trees. Environmental groups had voiced serious concerns about the project. Stating it would cut through critical habitat for caribou, grizzly bears and migratory birds. The proposed bike trail was compared to the one in Bow Valley through Banff National Park. The big difference, there is a fence along the highway and the bike trail is inside that fence. There was not going to be a fenced-off trail along this project.  Parks Canada had acknowledged that the trail could affect wildlife and pose safety risks and induce further development. The bike path would have gone through critical habitat for two endangered species, the mountain caribou and the whitebark pine. And create encounters between grizzly bears and cyclists, who are less likely to carry bear spray and travel quietly and at much higher speeds than hikers.

Waterton Lake National Park to receive $21 million from Ottawa

The Kenow fire scorched 40 per cent of the park. The flames burned 200 square kilometres and 80 per cent of the park’s hiking trails. The visitor center and other buildings were destroyed. Waterton’s townsite and historic Prince of Wales Hotel were saved. Park Superintedendent Salman Rasheed stated the first projects will be repairs to the 14 kilometer Red Rock Parkway and a rebuild of the popular Bear’s Hump hiking trail. Restoring the 16 kilometer Akamina Parkway and Crandell Mountain campground will need more time for planning and design. Some money is going toward monitoring and protecting the park’s ecosystem.

Kenow Fire at Waterton Lakes National Park has un-covered the Past

Freshly burned environments may provide a new start for invasive species, but they can also uncover the past. Parks Canada is conducting research in collaboration with local Blackfoot people into indigenous archeological sites, plus other sites discovered due to the Kenow fire.  Lead archeologist Bill Perry from Parks Canada states “what has been uncovered shows How the Blackfoot people really lived, revealing large areas of Blackfoot camps within the last 300 years. They have uncovered arrowheads, glass trading beads and stone tools. The fire also revealed trails that the Blackfoot people used over 7000 years ago. Another find is a depression-era work camp. In 1930’s the federal government hired men to build a major roadway thorough the park. Foundation of structure’ s in the camp, rusty tine tobacco, meat, condensed milk and coffee cans from that era have been discovered. These artifacts will change the parks history and they are mapping these finds, so they can be plotted onto maps, which will be verified with archival and aerial photos as well. To create a new history for this area.

Parks Canada forces Sunshine Village to sign new 42 – year lease

Ralph Scurfield, president and CEO of Sunshine Village, Ski resort, was forced to agreed to a new site guideline for Sunshine or have his family’s business sold by Parks Canada. Parks Canada gave Sunshine owner to January 21, 2019 to sign the 42-year lease with the site guidelines appended. If the 2020 lease was not signed, Parks Canada would impose two options on the owners, either: Sunshine would sell its infrastructure to Parks Canada for $1 dollar (and Parks Canada would tender out the property) or remove all infrastructure and return the land to its natural state. The new site guidelines reduce the leasehold by 61 hectares (land that is currently zoned and previously approved) and gives Sunshine no new parking. Parks Canada is urging Scurfield to build a 500-vehicle parking structure at a cost of $50 million (not an option for the owner due to cost).

Sunshine Village was the last ski resort in the mountain parks without the guideline that allows for managed growth while protecting the environment. The new guidelines would allow Sunshine Village to have up to 8500 visitors at a time from the current 6500. And build  an additional 3,650 square metres of commercial space, add up to eight new ski lifts and develop up to 80 hectares of new ski terrain.

Parks Canada rejected Sunshine’s parking proposal which included a 750-space satellite parking lot along the resorts access road, but the guidelines allow for more transportation and parking through a combination of transit and a parking structure of no pre-determined size at the base of the resort. Parks Canada states ” The Sunshine Village Ski area guidelines will provide a long-term predictability for the operator while ensuring that ecological integrity, including the protection of wildlife is the firs priority for decision making.”

Another concern by conservation groups is the increase number of visitors, in the new lease and the ecological concerns in Banff National Park. Which currently is only ranked as fair.

Cougar Warning now in effect for all areas surrounding the Town of Banff

Cougars have been frequenting the areas around the Town of Banff in search of food. Report all sightings immediately to Banff Park Dispatch at 403-762-1470.  Go to Wild Smart on “How to Avoid Cougar Encounters, Handling a Cougar Encounter and Handling a Cougar Attack.”

 The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System is now in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. Rogers Pass in Glacier National Park is a popular backcountry ski touring destination. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need an annual winter pass if you plan to go into the Winter Restricted Areas. The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into three areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter, you need a national pass
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

Kananaskis Speaker & Discovery Series: Winter Survival Skills

Join Jim Thorne of Foothills Search and Rescue, and discover basic winter survival skills, such as shelter building and fire starting. Dress warm and prepare to be outside. This is a free information series. Date: February 17, 2019  1.00 pm to be at Peter Lougheed Park, Discovery & Information Centre.  For more information email Joe Fowler (joe.fowler@gov.ab.ca)

X-Country Ski and Snowshoe Courses

University of Calgary Outdoor Club is offering different levels of x-country ski courses from beginners to refresher courses.  You can rent x-country ski equipment from the u of c outdoor club as well. If you take a x-country ski course with this organization then you can receive a 10% per cent discount on x-country ski equipment rentals. The same applies for snowshoeing. Go to the link below and search for snowshoeing or X-Country Skiing. For more information go to UCalgary Outdoor Adult Active Living

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Winter snow quote Antoine van Kleef

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Another Outdoor Winter Activity: Cross Country skiing:

Cross Country skiing is another way to get active in the winter and enjoy the beauty of the snow-covered landscape. Cross country skiing is a form of skiing where skiers rely on their own strength to move across snow-covered terrain. Cross country skiing is widely practiced as a sport and recreational activity however some still use it as a means of transportation.

 How to Choose X-Country (Nordic) Skies:
  • Your skiing style: Do you want to glide smoothly in set tracks, or do you want a workout as you zip along at high speeds? Maybe you want to explore? Knowing how you plan to use your skies is the first step to choosing the right pair.
  • Choosing the right ski size: The correct length is critical to an enjoyable ski experience.
  • Waxable or waxless bases: For classic skiing and off-track touring, this is a key choice. There is advantages to each style.

Three Skiing Styles:

  • Classic Style: This style of skiing is the stride and glide motion.
  • Skate Skiing: Skate skiing is done on groomed paths, often next to track-set terrain. Skate uses a pronounced pole plant an angled skating motion.
  • Off Track Touring Skiing: Most of your skiing is done on ungroomed trails and terrain, these cross country skis range from models that are a little wider than classic skis up to bigger mountaineering skis that have metal edges.

Ski Length:

Your weight and skill level are the two main factors to consider when it comes to cross-country ski length.

  • When buying cross-country skis according to your weight:
    • Most classic skis will end up being longer than your height by a certain amount.
    • Some modern classic skis (for recreational skiers) are designed to be skied shorter than traditional classic skis, which makes them easier for novices to handle.
    • skate skis will be closer to your own height in length.

Waxable and Waxless Bases:

Waxable Skistraction comes from the grip wax (kick wax) applied to the middle third of the ski. When you release the kick portion of the ski by unweighting the glide that happens comes from a different was (glide wax) applied to the rest of the base. It takes time to learn to wax for all snow/weather conditions.

Waxless Skisuse a textured surface in the kick zone (rather than grip wax) that grips snow when it is weighted, but still allows the ski glide when you shift your weight off it when you are going downhill. This gripping surface is either a fish scale-like pattern cut into the base material or a replaceable skin patch made of directional fibres. Skiers due not have to worry about day to day conditions when they use waxless skis.

Both Waxable and waxless bases require a glide wax on the sliding sections of the base to glide properly along the snow.

Next step is to choose Ski Bindings:

  • There are three types of bindings:
    • Frame Bindings: heel and toe pieces are connected by a frame.
    • Tech Bindings: Toe and heel pieces have pins that attach to a specific type of boot.
    • Telemark Bindings: always has a free heel during the climb up and the descent.

Your Ski Boots and Bindings must be compatible.

Your Ski Poles, you will want to match to the type of skiing you are doing. The right pole length is based on your height. Poles are made with different materials and come in adjustable or rigid. Don’t forget baskets.

For more information on how to buy XC ski’s and equipment visit the Mountain Equipment Coop website

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….see you on the trails …

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on February 2019 CORE Newsletter

January 2019 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

January 2019 Meeting

January’s monthly meeting is on Tuesday, January 29, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the   executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

January 29 Presentation by Alberta Wilderness Association

Alberta Wilderness Association

The CORE January meeting will feature a presentation by the AWA with their Wilderness Road Show. Core members guests and friends are welcome.

The Alberta Wilderness Association is dedicated to the conservation of wilderness and the completion of a protected areas network in Alberta. AWA is a voice for the environment, since 1965. AWA is a nonprofit federally registered charitable society.

The presentation by conservation specialists from the AWA, the “Wilderness Road Show“, is meant to increase public awareness about the value of Alberta’s public lands and to inspire a greater momentum towards achieving international conservation commitments agreed to by our federal and provincial governments. Conservation specialists Nissa Petterson and Joanna Skrajny will be presenting on Alberta’s public lands and elaborating on how Alberta’s public lands offer a tremendous opportunity to conserve Alberta’s wilderness and achieve representative protection amongst all six natural regions of Alberta. The presentation will also include a segment highlighting the recent proposal for the Bighorn Wildland Provincial Park.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Training Courses

CORE is looking into putting on the wilderness first aid course again, possibly in April. This was a very popular course last April, so stay tuned to the calendar and next month’s newsletter for updates.

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November and December 2018 and January 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for December 2018 and January 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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November 25 Elliston Park Lake Walk & Begim Restaurant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 25 Ptarmigan Cirque Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 27 CORE Xmas Celebration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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December 1 Zoolights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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December 2 CORE Annual Xmas Weekend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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December 8 Hike High Rockies Trail

 

 

 

 

 

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December 16 Elk Pass XC Ski

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December 16 Lower K-Lake and Marsh Trail Hike

 

 

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December 18 Xmas Light Walk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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December 22 Chester Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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December 27 West Crystal Line Snowy Owl

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 5 Rummel Lake Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 12 Cascade Fire Road XC Ski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 12 Frost Heave Snowdrift Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 12 Ingle Wood Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Eight New Parks Proposed for Bighorn Country Area of Rocky Mountains for Land Protection and Recreation

Bighorn Country lies in west-central Alberta along the eastern edges of Banff and Jasper National Parks. The Alberta government’s proposal is for 4000 square kilometres along the front ranges of the Rocky Mountains. The area has been under consideration for protection since the 1980’s and its core remains relatively free of industrial development. The region is home to vulnerable species from grizzly bears to bull trout to harlequin ducks.  Bighorn Country includes the designation of a new Wildland Provincial Park and new expanded or amended parks, recreation areas and public land use zones. For more information go to Alberta Parks – Bighorn Country Proposal.

The proposed Bighorn Country would support policy integration, direction and clarity needed to help guide decisions that collectively reflect and support the needs and values of Albertans.   Alberta Parks would like your feedback on this proposal to better understand how our social, environmental and economic values shape conservation and recreation management in the Bighorn Country.   For further information on the proposal and an online survey go to talkaep.alberta.ca.   Comments will be collected until February 15, 2019.

Lake Louise Ski Resort Fined for Cutting Down Endangered Trees

Lake Louise Ski Resort was fined $2.1 million dollars for cutting down 38 white bark pine along a ski run in 2013. The ski resort is being charged on two counts, one under the Species at Risk Act and the other under the Canada National Parks Act. The resort did not have a permit to cut down the white bark pine.  White bark pine is native to high elevations, close to or at tree line. This species of tree is being threaten by disease, fire and climate change.  The Ski Resort pleaded guilty last December 2017 to taking down a strand of trees, including the 38 endangered species. Lake Louise Ski Resort is appealing the decision either to have the charges stayed or reduce the fine to $200,000 dollars. They state the sentence is grossly disproportional and demonstrably unfit given the actual facts of the case.

Cave found in Wells Gray Provincial Park, B.C.

Wells Gray Cave – Sarlacc’s Pit

A massive, unexplored cave that is likely among the country’s largest has been discovered in a remote valley in B.C.’s Wells Gray Provincial Park.

The cave was initially spotted in April 2018 by a B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations helicopter team doing a caribou count. The cave was never discovered before as it was covered in snow. Geologist Katherine Hickson and a team of cave experts John Pollack and Lee Hollis spent months surveying the cave from satellite imagery and preparing before they visited the site on September 9, 2018, to confirm the cave’s significance. The cave’s opening is 100 metres by 60 metres – virtually the exact dimensions of a CFL football field. It is also extremely deep, extending more than 100 metres underground, with the first 80 metres of that being a straight vertical drop. A large volume of water rushes down the opening, flowing thru the cave and exits 2.1 kilometres away as a stream.  Hickson believes that no one has explored the cave before and it is not known to First Nations as this cave was covered by snow year around, until 20 to 50 years ago.  The initial group that discovered the cave called it Sarlacc’s pit, named after a monster’s den from Star Wars Return of the Jedi, due to how big the opening is. Currently this is only an informal name.  The status of the cave is under environmental protection due to, it is in a provincial park and its fragile environment. If any unauthorized person is caught in the area, they will be charged under the Provincial Parks Act.

Inner Ranges by Geoff Powter – CORE’s Mike Galbraith featured in this book

Inner Ranges

Inner Ranges brings together an enlightening and entertaining selection of mountain writing by one of Canada’s most respected adventure journalists and thinkers, Geoff Powter.  This collection of original and previously published pieces includes provocative editorial and opinion work about the state of adventure, personal tales from a life of exploration and risk-taking, some touches of humour, and award winning profiles of some of Canada’s mountaineering greats. Stories include conversations with and profiles of alpine personalities such as Barry Blanchard, Sonnie Trotter, Lena Rowat, Raphael Slawinski, David Jones, Mike Galbraith and many more.  Bringing these essays together for the first time has given Geoff the unique opportunity to reflect back on these stories behind the stories, the consequences of their publication, and the sometimes complex process of writing about adventure and adventurous lives.

Excerpt from “A lightening Sky” chapter on the ascent of Manaslu:

Our days were made immeasurably better by the beauty around us, and each step upwards seemed to expand the horizon. To the north, Tibet lay as a carpet of dry brown, endlessly bleak, but to the west, the garden of peaks in the Ganesh Himal seemed to change colour and form every five minutes. As we set into a daily rythm, so did the weather. Morning would dawn with a wisp of low clouds, then these would slowly well up every day into an endless field of cotton batting by mid-afternoon. Mike would always complain on his 6 p.m. radio call that it was snowing or raining at base camp, and day after day we radioed back that we were basking in sun.”

Mike has also written a short adventure blog about this same trip titled WHAT HAPPENED ON MANASLU? and it is published on the CORE website.

 The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System is now in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. Rogers Pass in Glacier National Park is a popular backcountry ski touring destination. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need an annual winter pass if you plan to go into the Winter Restricted Areas. The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into three areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter, you need a national pass
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

Backcountry Ski Guide Puts Icefield Parkway on Map

Icefields Parkway has been the go to spot for backcountry skiers, but there were only a few places to go.  Marcus Baranow released a guide book for backcountry skiing along the Icefields Parkway called “Confessions of a Ski Bum: The Icefields Parkway Lake Louise to Bow Summit.” This book provides useful information about dozens of backcountry ski routes that can be easily accessed from the highway. This book also provides general information about spending time in Banff National Park, as well as safety information before travelling in the backcountry. The book can be found in stores throughout the Bow Valley.

Follow up on the Three Black Bears Found in a Washroom in Banff National Park

The three bears were fitted with GPS tracking devices when they were released back into the park in July. Two of the three black bears that were rescued last year after being found locked in a public washroom in Banff National Park are in separate dens for their first winter. One bear denned on Oct 15 and the other on Nov 5. Sadly the third bear did not make it.

 Banff Park Continues Fight Against Whirling Disease

As of November 13, 2018 Parks Canada continues habitat control due to whirling disease found in fish stock at Johnson Lake.  The 15 hectare lake remains open for the winter, but Parks Canada has issued a warning that the uneven ice surface from gillnets, buoys or natural cracking can cause a trip hazard to skaters.  Whirling disease was discovered in Johnson Lake in 2016. This disease has been confirmed in creeks and rivers throughout Alberta, including the Bow, Oldman, North Saskatchewan and Red Deer watersheds.  Whirling disease can affect several fish species.

Kananaskis Avalanche Awareness Day 2019

A free one day event being hosted by Alberta Parks on January 20, 2019 at Burstall Pass Day Use Area (Smith Dorrien Hwy 742), at 11:00 am. Activity stations and demos include: assessing avalanche terrain, snow pit testing, beacon and transceiver searches, quinzee building, fire starting strategies, and meet an avalanche dog in training. Dress warmly, bring water, snacks, snowshoes and a camera.  For more information email Joe Fowler (joe.fowler.gov.ab.ca)

Kananaskis Speaker & Discovery Series: Winter Survival Skills

Join Jim Thorne of Foothills Search and Rescue, and discover basic winter survival skills, such as shelter building and fire starting. Dress warm and prepare to be outside. This is a free information series. Date: February 17, 2019  1.00 pm to be at Peter Lougheed Park, Discovery & Information Centre.  For more information email Joe Fowler (joe.fowler@gov.ab.ca)

Lake Louise Ice Magic Festival

Lake Louise Ice Magic Festival runs from January 16 to 27, 2019. The Ice Magic Festival is a world-class ice carving event. Watch as the ice artists, from around the world, at the ice carving competition, January 16 to 18.  Or view the finished ice sculptures over the following nine days. Admission: is free to attend Ice Magic Monday to Friday and on the weekends before 10 am or after 5.30pm. Tickets are required during peak times and can be purchased online up to 48 hours in advance for a 25% discount.

Driving Safely

  1. Inform family members of trip details and when you will contact then again. Send an email so it’s easy to access this info and leave message on their cell phones.
  2. Check the weather and road conditions before starting out.  Consider changing your route or adding extra time to your journey if there are adverse conditions.
  3. Where possible, plan to drive during daytime to make the drive safer.
  4. Drive on good winter tires.  They make an enormous difference.
  5. Have a recently serviced car equipped with airbags, traction control and other safety bells and whistles.  The airbags can save your life.
  6. Keep an emergency kit in the vehicle.  This kit would include food, water and first aid items. Candles are a great heat source, but don’t forget waterproof matches to light them!
  7. Wear winter clothes, with more winter gear close to you.  Definitely have an additional warm coat, toque, gloves, socks and good footwear easily accessible, and blankets.
  8. In SUV’s especially, secure loose gear as it can become a projectile in an accident. This includes putting your skis on the roof – they’re sharp and can cut you in an accident.
  9. Consider having a Garmin InReach device (or a similar device) with you in case of emergency.  On many mountain roads there are no cell phone towers.   This can save hours of waiting to get help to you.
  10. Get a CAA or AAA membership.  A roll-over on a remote road is costly.  

X-Country Ski and Snowshoe Courses

University of Calgary Outdoor Club is offering different levels of x-country ski courses from beginners to refresher courses.  You can rent x-country ski equipment from the u of c outdoor club as well. If you take a x-country ski course with this organization then you can receive a 10% per cent discount on x-country ski equipment rentals. The same applies for snowshoeing. Go to the link below and search for snowshoeing or X-Country Skiing. For more information go to UCalgary Outdoor Adult Active Living

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Winter Snow Quote Edmund Hillary

 For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Avalanche Awareness

Avalanche Awareness

What Causes Avalanches?

You. Over 90% of fatal avalanche accidents are caused by the victim or someone in the victim’s party.

If you are travelling in the winter backcountry you need to know how to:

  • Recognize avalanche terrain: Know what to look for and how to avoid dangerous slopes. and Look Up! Even if you are not on a slope, many trails travel through terrain threatened by avalanches from above.

Recognize unstable conditions: Conditions that can change quickly during the day. Know what to watch for and keep your eyes and ears open.

Recognize Terrain Traps: A terrain trap is any feature that makes injuries or burial more likely, including: Gullies, creek beds, ditches, cliffs, flats at the base of steep slopes, trees or rocks in slide paths.

Recognize Avalanche Terrain:

  • You need a steep slope at least 10m x 10m to create an avalanche that could be dangerous for a person.
  • An Avalanche normally occurs on a slopes between 30 and 45 degrees.
  • Convex rolls are prime trigger points but you can also be at risk below these slopes.
  • Cornices and wind slabs build on lee(downward) slopes.
  • Slide paths are open areas on a forested slope, cleared of trees by repeated avalanches.

If you are on or below slopes like these, you are in avalanche terrain.

Recognize Unstable Conditions:

  • Heavy Snowfall
    • Approximately 30 cm or more of new snow over 48 hours (less if snow is being blown by the wind).
    • Rapid accumulation: 2 cm of snow per hour for several hours.
  • Wind
    • Wind slabs form on the lee (downwind) side of ridge lines.
    • If there has been recent drifting, there are probably wind slabs.
  • Warming
    • Strong sunshine, warm temperatures and rain can all have a destabilizing effect on the snow.
    • the first warming (close to zero degrees C or warmer) after a storm is often when avalanches occur. 
  • Snow Pack   
    • Signs of avalanche activity form today or yesterday
    • Whumpf !!!!   This sound is a warning that weak layers are collapsing in the snowpack.
    • Cracks in the snow surface that shoot out from your snowshoes.

If you see any of these signs, avoid avalanche terrainStick to meadows and other flat or gently inclined areas.

Avalanche Rescue Equipment:

If you and your group are going into avalanche terrain, everyone needs the following essential equipment and know how to use it.

  • Avalanche Transceiver
    • Digital devices designed to locate buried victims quickly.
  • Avalanche Probe
    • Once assembled, probes pinpoint a buried victim after the transceiver search.
  • Avalanche Shovel
    • Avalanche debris sets up like cement so you need a strong shovel and good technique.
  • Avalanche Balloon Pack
    • If you are caught in an avalanche, triggering the airbags will help you stay on top of the snow.

Survival Time: The quicker you can rescue an avalanche victim, the better the chances of survival.

Attached cards is from Avalanche Canada/MEC/CP/Teck on  North American Public Avalanche Danger Scale and how avalanche danger is determined by the likelihood, size and distribution of avalanches.

North American Public Avalanche Danger Scale

5 is Extreme

4 is High

3 is Considerable

2 is Moderate

1 is Low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 North American Avalanche Danger Scale is determined by the likelihood of size and distribution of avalanches

 

5 Extreme – Avoid all avalanche terrain.

4 High – Very dangerous avalanche conditions. Travel in avalanche terrain not recommended.

3 Considerable – Dangerous avalanche conditions. Careful snowpack evaluation, cautious route-finding and conservative decision-making essential.

2 Moderate – Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully, identify features of concern.

1 Low – Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.

Before going into the backcountry check the local avalanche report.

For more information about avalanches and Avalanche Conditions, visit Avalanche Canada.

 

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….see you on the trails …

Jane

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on January 2019 CORE Newsletter

November 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend

Reminder of CORE’s Annual Christmas Weekend is November 30 to December 2, 2018.  Snowshoe and Cross country skiing activities are planned. Staying at the Inn of the Rockies – Harvie Heights/Canmore.  Please refer to CORE Calendar for more information.

November CORE Meeting

CORE Xmas Party

November 27, 2018 Is CORE’s Christmas Party.  

There will be food, drinks, socializing, retelling of adventures past and planned, and a slide show of past winter activities. There will be a contest based on quiz questions from the Aug, Sept, Oct and Nov Newsletters and a Christmas song and slideshow featuring events from last winter’s activities.  Members and guests welcome. Join for a fun evening at Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14th Ave. S.W. 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the   executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

Remember there is no core meeting in December. The next CORE monthly meeting will be January 29, 2019

Coordinator Meeting Held  November 6:

A successful meeting with several coordinators and quite a few new winter trips put into the calendar to start off the winter activities.  Members posting calendar events should not send them out as email notifications more than one month in advance as this is adding to unnecessary emails which should be sent out near the event. Note that calendar events can be set up to send out emails at a selected number of days before the event.

CORE’s event coordinators have done some pre-planning for activities for this winter. These of course will depend on weather and the amount of snowfall. And more trips will be posted, sometimes on short notice. Members, please keep an eye on the CORE Activities Calendar for updates.  A summary of calendar events planned for the upcoming winter season is posted here as a blog on the CORE website.

CORE will offer Subsidized Outdoor courses for members:

If you would like to see a particular course (eg: first aid, gps, navigation, avalanche, x-country ski, other) subsidized by CORE from the Peterman Fund, please email CORE at mailbox@corehike.org

Members Corner

CORE Executive has agreed to have a “members corner” in the Newsletter.  This space is for all members to post personal items to sell or buy, trips that you are planning and would like a companion, etc..  Please see the Members Corner section near the end of the newsletter for further details.

CORE Twitter Feed Restored to the CORE Home Page

The CORE Twitter feed @corehike has been restored to the CORE Home page, with full 280 character and image capability. CORE communications for special events events, monthly presentations and weekly activities summaries, as well as occasional re-tweets of relevant outdoor-related posts (e.g. avalanche conditions, trail conditions) will now appear on the Twitter feed section of https://corehike.org/  .

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

October CORE Meeting

Lori Beattie’s presentation on Calgary’s Best Walks and Mountain Adventures was well received. With 34 members attending the presentation.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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October 27 Cochrane Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 28 Red Ridge Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 30 Sheep River Trail Mt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 31 Halloween Dance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 3 Brown Lowery Provincial Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 4 Bluerock Creek Trail

 

 

 

 

 

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November  10 Weaselhead Trail

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November 11 Jumping Pound Loop

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November 18 Stoneworks Canyon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

 Hundreds of Hectares of trees being removed from Jasper Park Area

Above the Jasper townsite, 350 hectares of trees are being removed as part of a wildfire risk reduction project. It’s an expansion of the community fireguard that has been maintained for the last 30 years. Thousands of pine beetle-infested lodgepole pine trees and mature spruce trees are being removed to make it easier for crews to battle a potential wildfire. The firebreak extends from Patricia Lake to Highway 16. A large number of hiking trails in the Pyramid Bench area are being impacted the tree removal. This project is expected to be completed by spring 2019.     Whistler Campground is receiving a massive upgrade that also, includes tree removal. 60 percent of the campground’s 100 hectare’s will be removed. Most of the trees are already dead or pine infested and are being removed for safety reasons and fire risk reduction. Some trees are being removed for construction to allow wider roads and sites. Campground will re-open in the spring of 2020.    Thousands of trees along the east boundary of Jasper National Park will be burnt to slow the spread of mountain pine beetles.

The Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor

A parcel of land in the Crowsnest Pass has been protected and named in honor of former premier Jim Prentice.  The Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor is roughly five kilometers wide from east to west. It will connect Crown forest reserve land in the north to the Castle parks, as well as to Waterton Lakes National Park in the south and the adjoining Glacier National Park on the U.S. side.  Officials with the Nature Conservancy of Canada said the project has international significance as it will allow wildlife to travel freely through the Rocky Mountains in Canada and the United States.  The Alberta Provincial government has given $1 million to this project.  The Nature Conservancy of Canada still needs to raise another $5 million to acquire the remaining 2200 hectares of this corridor.  The organization already has lined up multiple donors for this project.

 West Bragg Creek opens Three New Trails

On November 3, 2018 there was a grand opening to celebrate three new trails, The West Bragg Creek portion of the Great Trail, the new WBC Interpretive Trail and the WBC Provincial Recreational Area. For more information go to Bragg Creek Trails.

The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System will soon be in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need a annual winter pass.The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into Three Areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

The official beginning of the regular season at Canmore Nordic Provincial Park starts Saturday November 17, 2018

Avalanche Training Courses

Yamnuska Mountain Adventures is offering avalanche skill training and the principles of winter backcountry travel.  The organization is Avalanche Canada AST provider. They offer courses in Canmore/Banff and Calgary. For more information go to Yamnuska Mountain Adventures, Avalanche Course.

X-Country Ski and Snowshoe Courses

University of Calgary Outdoor Club is offering different levels of x-country ski courses from beginners to refresher courses.  You can rent x-country ski equipment from the u of c outdoor club as well. If you take a x-country ski course with this organization then you can receive a 10% per cent discount on x-country ski equipment rentals. The same applies for snowshoeing. Go to the attached link and search for snowshoeing. For more information go to UCalgary Outdoor Adult Active Living.

November is CPR month

Hopefully you will never have to use CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation).  To have this skill in case a fellow hiker, snowshoer, x-countryskier, family member or a friend needs your help is a life saver. Many work places now offer courses thru the organization’s wellness plans, plus there is outside organizations that offer CPR.  Interesting Fact:  Did you know that the Bee Gees, Abba, Justin Bieber, Adel and many more have an instrumental role in CPR??!!!  Their songs are used for counting the 100 beats needed to perform CPR!. There is a total of 47 songs. The Bee Gees,Staying Alive, is the number one song.

 Nature Calgary Speaker Series

Speaker Series November 21 7.30pm to 9.30pm will feature Hannah Lucas from Oceanbridge.  Hannah also works full time at the Calgary Zoo. Presentation is on “How the Oceanbridge program is engaging youth across Canada to actively participate in waterway and ocean health and education.”   For more information go to Nature Calgary’s Speaker Series 

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

November Newsletter clue: “What are the three types of traction devices to help you, in winter hiking?” The answer is in the “Hither and Yon” section of the November Newsletter.

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

  For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Winter Hiking

You Do Not Need to Stop Hiking in Winter!

Winter Hikers use three different kinds of traction devices, micro spikes, mountaineering crampons and snowshoes. Micro spikes and mountaineering crampons are used to provide traction on ice and packed snow. Snowshoes are used mainly to provide floatation on top of the surface snow. Micro spikes are used on fairly level hiking trails covered with packed snow or ice. And on steep slopes only packed with snow.  They provide extra traction that you need when your boot treads are no longer giving you traction. Mountaineering Crampons are used when you are on a higher angle that is ice or ice covered rocks or a mixture of ice and snow. That is when the longer and sharper traction aids are helpful. Micro spikes have too much give and the spikes are too short to penetrate deeply into ice when you need the device to hold your weight.

Snowshoe Anyone

Snowshoes are to keep you from sinking as deeply in the snow, as you would if you walked on top of the snow. Snow shoes also, help you conserve your energy. You do not have to pull yourself out of holes when you sink to your hips or waist. Snowshoes have crampons on the underside that provides the traction on snow or ice.  CORE member Carol had written an exceptional article in a previous CORE newsletter, on Snowshoes sizing, bindings, traction and heel lifts. With a video on further snowshoe tips. Plus, an article on different types of micro spikes and their uses. I have copied Carol’s article below.

 

 

 

 

Snowshoe Sizing

Snowshoe size is a key factor in getting the right amount of flotation. Generally, the heavier the person or the lighter and drier the snow, the more snowshoe surface area is required. Snowshoe size also depends on the type of activity you intend to do. For deep powder, a longer, wider snowshoe would be the most effective, but heavier and more tiring to use. Keep in mind that on CORE snowshoeing trips you are often on a trail where someone else has already “broken trail,” in which case you can use a smaller, narrower snowshoe – much easier and less tiring.

Men’s vs Women’s Gear 

Men’s snowshoes are designed to accommodate larger boots and heavier loads. For example, aluminum-frame snowshoes come in multiple sizes, usually 8″ x 25″, 9″ x 30″ and 10″ x 36″ or something similar. Women’s snowshoes tend to feature narrower, more contoured frame designs and sizes down to 8″ x 21″. Their bindings are sized to fit women’s footwear.

Easy-to-Fasten Bindings 

Make sure the bindings fit the boots you are going to be wearing, and that the fasteners are heavy duty (so they won’t break) and easy to secure and adjust.

Boa System for Bindings

By turning a wheel, a cable tightens evenly throughout the entire binding and heel for a secure fit. The binding also releases easily, making snowshoes with a Boa closure system one of the most user-friendly bindings.

Snowshoe Traction Devices 

Snowshoes for rolling or mountain terrain will come with toe crampons that rotate under the front of your foot to aid in climbing hills. Heel crampons are in a V shape and slow you down when descending hills. Look for both for casual snowshoeing in the Rockies. Some more rugged snowshoes may also have side rails (also called traction bars) to prevent slipping when crossing steep slopes.

Heel lifts

Also known as climbing bars, these are wire bails that can be flipped up under your heels to relieve calf strain on steep uphill sections and save energy on long ascents.

Watch this YouTube video , Tripper Girl for some further useful snowshoeing tips.

Another snowshoe tip blog is from hiking with Barry.

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OUTDOOR TRACTION DEVICES:

Highly Recommended by CORE for Winter Hikes and Outings

Kahtoola MICROspikes:

Cheryl with MICROspikes

Although the Kahtoola MICROspikes ($79 at MEC – November 2018) are perhaps a bit too aggressive for regular around-town sidewalk use, they are a good choice for all-purpose go-to option for longer hikes in mixed snow and icy conditions. Despite heavy use and abuse on everything from frozen streets to icy backcountry trails, they perform flawlessly and are incredibly durable. As a further testament, Backpacker magazine awarded the MICROspikes one of their 2012 Editors’ Choice Gold Awards, which honors exceptional outdoor gear that has withstood the test of time. As of 2018 Kathtoola micro spikes are still ranked in the top three for winter hiking.

 ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip:

The ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip ($49 at MEC, $55 at Atmosphere – November 2018) are a slightly different, slightly less aggressive take on the MICROspikes. They slip on using a similar stretchy rubber harness system, but instead of short, sharp vertical teeth underfoot, they use a lower-profile multi-toothed chain for grip. The ice trekkers diamond grip have some excellent reviews and are still in the top 5 for microspikes.

ICE trekkers Diamond Grip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hillsound Trail Crampon Traction Device:

The Hillsound Trail Crampon Traction Device ($65 at MEC, $65 at Atmosphere) They are lightweight which makes it easier to walk on ice and snow, has superior traction and stability and helps reduce muscle fatigue.  These Crampons feature a ergonomic plate system that stretch to fit with the sole of the boot. And elastic elastomer to stretch over top of the boot with an added strap to keep device secure.

 

Hillsound Trail Crampon

 

 

TIP: When buying any outdoor traction device, make sure that you buy them large enough to fit the boots that you will be wearing most often when using the spikes or cleats (which could be a size larger than your walking shoes).

 

 

 

 

 

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….see you on the trails …

Jane

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on November 2018 CORE Newsletter

CORE 2018-2019 Winter Schedule

CORE’s event coordinators have done some pre-planing for activities this winter. These of course will depend on weather and the amount of snowfall. And more trips will be posted sometimes on short notice, so, members, please please keep an eye on the CORE Activities Event Calendar for updates.

Dec 1 Sat
16:00 – 17:00

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend
Inns of the Rockies (Harvie Heights/ Canmore)

10:00 – 17:00

Snowshoeing day – part of the CORE weekend trip

Dec 2 Sun
16:00 – 17:00

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend
Inns of the Rockies (Harvie Heights/ Canmore)

09:30 – 14:00

Sawmill, snowshoeing, easy

10:00 – 17:00

Cross-country skiing, moderate rating but location is still TBD – part of CORE weekend trip

Dec 8 Sat 08:00 – 16:00

Backcountry Ski (Difficult rating, avalanche gear required)

19:15 – 21:30

Magnificat: A Christmas Celebration -concert by Festival Chorus

Dec 16 Sun 10:00 – 16:00

West Bragg Creek XC Ski (M)

Dec 18 Tue 19:00 – 20:30

Calgary Christmas Lights Walk (easy to moderate)

Dec 22 Sat 09:00 – 18:00

Chester Lake, mod, snowshoeing

Dec 27 Thu 09:00 – 14:00

West Crystal Line/Snowy Owl, West Bragg Creek, easy, snowshoe

Jan 6 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Rummel Lake, mod, snowshoe

Jan 12 Sat 07:00 – 16:00

Backcountry Ski Day (Difficult rating, avalanche gear required)

Jan 12 Sat 09:00 – 16:00

Snowshoe – Frost Heave Trail/Snowdrift Trail – Chester Lake area (M)

Jan 20 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Rawson Lake, mod, snowshoeing

Jan 26 Sat 07:00 – 16:00

Backcountry Ski Day (Difficult rating, avalanche gear required)

Jan 29 Tue 19:00 – 21:00

CORE Monthly Meeting. Presentation by a member of the Alberta Wilderness Association. “Wilderness Road Show”

Feb 3 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Marushka Lake, easy/mod, snowshoeing

Feb 10 Sun 09:00 – 17:00

Ranger Ridge snowshoeing (moderate rating)

Feb 16 Sat 08:00 – 17:00

X country Ski, PLP. Moderate, full day

Feb 23 Sat 09:30 – 16:30

X-C Ski – Bill Milne Trail – Kananaskis Village area

Feb 24 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Mt. Murray, easy, snowshoeing

Mar 3 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Louise Creek, mod, snowshoeing

 

 

By |Special Articles|Comments Off on CORE 2018-2019 Winter Schedule

October 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Event Coordinator Meeting, November 6, 2018

Calling all hikers, snow shoers, x-country skiers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you.

This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.  The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on Tuesday, November 6, 2018, from 7 pm to 9 pm.  Contact information is on the  CORE calendar.

And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities.

Members Corner

CORE Executive has agreed to have a “members corner” in the Newsletter.  This space is for all members to post personnel items to sale or buy, trips that you are planning and would like a companion, etc..  Please see the Members Corner section near the end of the newsletter for further details.

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend

Reminder of CORE’s Annual Christmas Weekend is November 30 to December 2, 2018.  Snowshoe and Cross country skiing activities are planned. Staying at the Inn of the Rockies – Harvie Heights/Canmore.  Please refer to CORE Calendar for more information.

CORE Twitter Feed Restored to the CORE Home Page

The CORE Twitter feed @corehike has been restored to the CORE Home page, with full 280 character and image capability. CORE communications for special events events, monthly presentations and weekly activities summaries, as well as occasional re-tweets of relevant outdoor-related posts (e.g. avalanche conditions, trail conditions) will now appear on the Twitter feed section of https://corehike.org/  .

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 

October CORE Meeting – Presenting “Calgary’s Best Walks and Hikes” and Mountain Adventures 

October’s monthly meeting is on Tuesday, October 30 from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm at Scarboro Community Centre, 1727 – 14th Avenue SW

It will feature : Lori Beattie owner of Fit Frog Adventures, a company that is dedicated to making the outdoors accessible to all. She guides Calgarians and tourists year-round through Calgary neighborhoods, on urban nature hikes, and into the wilds of the Rocky Mountains. Lori is author of the book Calgary’s Best Walks and Hikes and her latest book Calgary’s Best Walks, as well as Calgary’s Best Bike Rides and Trails. Lori has shared her favorite walks on CTV Morning and Breakfast TV and she will now share her latest book, as well as some adventures in the mountains, with members of CORE at our upcoming meeting.

Members and non-members alike are invited to attend.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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September 23 Members at top of Overlook Rae Lake

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September 23 Powderface Ridge Memorial Hike

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September 30 Weaselhead hike group

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October 5 Music Night Older than Dirt Band

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October 7 Members at Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park, Cochrane

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October 14 – 17 Core members turn out for Powderface Creek Prairie Link hike

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October 20 Group members at Lake Minnewanka

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October 21 Silver Springs Escarpment Hike

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October 21 Staggered Pints at Triwood Community Centre

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 NEWS & NOTES

 Kananaskis Country 40 Years Old

The Alberta Government is putting 5.2 Million into Kananaskis Country to mark the 40th anniversary of the park. The park was officially opened September 22, 1978. Prior to 1978 the provincial government did not have an environmental plan for the crown land. Premier, Peter Lougheed recognized the importance of preserving the land for future generations to enjoy. The 5.2 million will be used to upgrade the Lower Kananaskis River and Barrier Lake area at the north end. Currently $700,000 is being used to restore Ha Ling Trail and three huts at Castle.

Conservationist calls for a cap on visitors to Banff National Park

A Banff conservationist is calling for a cap on the number of visitors to the national park. The amount of people is not only threatening the ecology of the park but the visitor experience as well. Especially the top attractions of Moraine Lake and Banff’s townsite. He believes the park needs to establish a limit on the number of people who visit the park on a given day. This could be done by setting up an online booking system.  Parks Canada stated 1.3 million people have passed through the gates in July and August of this year. Parks Canada is monitoring the situation, and currently has no plans for caps or quotas. They have put in bus shuttles to these attractions, and are having success with these alternative modes of transportation.

Friends of Fish Creek Speaker Series

Thursday – October 25, 2018 7 pm to 8 pm at Fish Creek Environmental Learning Centre – presented by Julie MacDougall – Senior Parks Planner South Region Alberta Environmental and Parks – Topic on “The Castle Provincial Park and Castle Wildlife Provincial Park” why the parks were established, and an overview of the conversation, wildlife, ecological values of the area and opportunities to work with the indigenous people to establish new recreational opportunities. Need to register thru Everbrite.

Nature Calgary Speaker Series And Annual Banquet

Nature Calgary’s Annual Banquet is November 10, 2018 featuring the wardens. For more information go to Nature Calgary’s Annual Banquet .

Speaker Series November 21 7.30pm to 9.30pm will feature Hannah Lucas from Oceanbridge.  Hannah also works full time at the Calgary Zoo. Presentation is on “How the Oceanbridge program is engaging youth across Canada to actively participate in waterway and ocean health and education.”   For more information go to Nature Calgary’s Speaker Series

Canmore Nordic Ski Club – Swap and Consignment

CONSIGNEE DROP OFF & EARLY BIRD TICKETS:

Saturday, November 3, 2018, 9:00am – noon, Bill Warren Training Centre   Early Bird Tickets : $20 per person purchased at Consignee Drop-Off. Limited to 100 tickets.

SALE:

Sunday, November 4, 2018, from 10:00 am to noon,  9 am for early bird tickets – Bill Warren Training Centre.  For more information go to Canmore Nordic Ski Club website

Foothills Nordic Centre – Lifesport Ski Swap and Consignment

October 27 to October 29, 2018   Friday 4 pm to 8 pm, Saturday and Sunday 10 am to 6 pm. Consignments now being accepted. Location 1110 Gladstone Rd NW. For more information go to Lifesport Ski Swap

Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival

Feature films, photography and books on mountain culture, including mountain art and craft sale, music and free events. Starts October 27 at 10am, to November 4, 2018 at the Banff Centre.  For more information go to Banff Mountain Film and Festival

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

October Newsletter clue: “How many meters approximately, should you be away from the bear for the spray to work effectively?” The answer is in the “Hither and Yon” section of the October Newsletter.

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

For sale – pair of metal-edged XC skis with bindings. Length 185 CM. Well used. Waxable. Selling for $20. Contact Stu at studotocox@gmail.com for more info/photos, or come to the October 30 members meeting to have a look. 

 

Adventure Stories

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

 TOP Larch Hikes in Bragg Creek, Banff, Kananaskis Country and Calgary

Bragg Creek: 1. Prairie Mt Trail   2. Elbow Valley to Riverview Trail  3.  Boundary Ridge Trail  4. Strange Brew Trail  5.  Ranger Summit Trail

Banff:  1.  Taylor Lake  2. Saddleback Trail  3. Lake Agnes  4. Arnica Lake  5. Larch Valley and Sentinel Pass

Kananaskis Country:  1. Mt Loretta Ponds  2. Chester Lake  3.   Burstall Pass  4. Rawson Lake  5. Ptarmigan Cirque

Calgary: 1. Confederation Park  2. Edworthy Park  3. Fish Creek Provincial Park  4. Nose Hill Park  5. Weasel head Flats

 

 Bear Spray

Whether you are hiking, biking, picnicking, camping, trail running or paddling in any provincial or national parks, you do not know if you will meet up with a bear or other wildlife. You should be prepared by carrying bear spray.  It can help reduce serious injury if you are in an aggressive bear or wildlife attackUsing bear spray is the last resort.

Bear Spray is a non-lethal, non-toxic deterrent that causes temporary eye tearing and respiratory distress to the animal. It is a deterrent containing capsaicin.

The cannister releases a cone shaped cloud of pepper spray to a distance of approximately 5 m and at a speed of over 100 km/hr..

Before you hit the trails, read the instructions, carry in a holster you can reach with your dominant hand. Practice using the spray to become familiar with the spray radius and your reaction time, and to ensure the can is working properly.

Remove the safety clip and aim for the bears face, ensure nozzle is pointing away from you. Give quick one second bursts until the bear retreats and leaves immediately.

Link to Video by Parks Canada demonstrates “How to use bear spray”:

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….see you on the trails …

Jane

 

 

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on October 2018 CORE Newsletter

September 2018 Core Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Event Coordinator Meeting, November 6, 2018

Calling all hikers, snow shoers, x-country skiers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you.

This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.

The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Place and Time will be announced shortly in the CORE calendar.

And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities.

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

September CORE Meeting – Presenting “Walking the 88 Temple Pilgrimage in Shikoku Japan”

September’s monthly meeting is on Tuesday, September 25 at Scarboro Community Centre. It will feature a slide show: “Walking the 88 Temple Pilgrimage in Shikoku Japan”, presented by CORE member Kiyoko.  The 88 Temple Pilgrimage is Japan’s most famous pilgrimage route, a 1200 km loop around the island of Shikoku. While most modern-day pilgrims (an estimated 100,000 yearly) travel by tour bus, a small minority still set out the old-fashioned way on foot, a journey which takes about six weeks to complete. Kiyoko and 3 friends undertook this journey in 2007, and the story of their odyssey promises to be very interesting, so don’t miss it

Members and non-members alike are invited to attend.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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Sept 1 Foran Grade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 3 Mist Mountain – Their finest hour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 9 Rawson Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 15 At the top of Pocaterra Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 15 Pocaterra Ridge Views of the mountains around

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Courses

Regretfully, the Executive had to make the difficult decision to cancel the Wilderness First Aid Course scheduled for Saturday, September 22 due to lack of participation. It was rather surprising as the last time this course was presented it was very well attended and the feedback was excellent.  Thank you to those who sent comments from which, it seemed more a question of scheduling than lack of interest, but that will always be the case.  The Executive will now discuss whether to put this, or another course, on in the near future.

 

Cold and Wet Weather

The weather is starting to get cooler outside, bringing rain and snow.  Ensure you bring a warm layer of clothes and weather resistance gear on your outdoor events.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

September Newsletter clue: “Which type of bear has the longer claws?” The answer is in the Hither and Yon” section of the September Newsletter.

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Hither and Yon

 


 

 

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

 

 

 

 Bear Smart

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Know your different Bears:
    1. Grizzly bear has pronounced shoulder hump, may have silver or grey hairs on face, back and hump, ears are round, nose is pig like, claws longer 7.5 to 10 cm in length.
    2. Black bear are more uniform in colour, nose is dog like, claws are short 2.5 cm in length.
  2. Bear Signs: bear tracks, bear trails, scat, rolled logs and rocks, torn stumps, rubbed chewed and claw marked trees, diggings, ant hills torn up.
  3. Avoid encounters:
    1. Make lots of noise.
    2. Travel in groups.
    3. Walk pets on leash.
    4. Be aware of your surroundings.
    5. Recognize signs of wildlife.
    6. Carry bear spray and know how to use.
  4. If you encounter a bear:
    1. Stop, Never Run
    2. Stay calm and size up the situation
    3. If bear is unaware of your presence, back away slowly the way you came.
    4. If bear is aware of your presence, talk calmly and back away slowly.
    5. In a defensive encounter, if a bear comes within your range, use your bear spray, if bear makes contact play dead.
      1. If attack continues fight back, act big and loud, use your bear spray, attack the eyes and nose.

For more information on handling bears and another wildlife encounters visit Wildsmart at:

  http://www.wildsmart.ca/

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….see you on the trails …

Jane and Stu

 

 

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CORE August 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Seeking Communications Coordinator to Publish the CORE Newsletter

Despite the personal satisfaction in putting together the CORE Newsletter each month, your current author is spending more time in administrative duties than he is on the trails. He needs your help. If you could find the time to put together and publish the small online monthly newsletter, we need you! This is an Executive position as Communications Coordinator and we would of course like to fill it as such, but if you could take on just the newsletter task, then we would be very grateful. Interested? Please email the Executive at mailbox@corehike.org, or contact Carol or Stu for more details on what is entailed.

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

Monthly Presentations

Our Presentation planner(s) have have done a great job in finding presenters for the monthly club meetings at the Scarboro Community Centre, right through to the end of the year, some by club members relating their adventures, and others by very interesting outside presenters. Members and non-members alike are invited to attend. If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for August. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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Golden Hikes

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Golden Scrambles

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Day Hikes

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NEWS & NOTES

Courses

CORE will be sponsoring a Wilderness  First Aid course. This is a one-day, non-certification course, similar to the very successful one we had a couple of years ago. The course will be mostly funded by the club from the Peterman Endowment Fund, but there will be a small registration fee. The planned date is is September 22 at the Bragg Creek Community Centre. Please stay tuned for further information – we’ll post it on the calendar as soon as we have everything firmed up.

Injury Avoidance and Fitness Exercises

The CORE August presenter was chiropractor, Dr. Colin Johnston, who summited Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in 2016. Out of that experience he has developed a set of exercises, particularly in regard to the knee area, to mitigate injuries when participating in strenuous activities. He has kindly provided CORE with a description of some exercises to improve knee streangth. A link to the PDF file, including his contact information, is provided on the CORE Safety Guidelines page.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

The Executive is initiating a contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month (beginning with the August newsletter), there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried withing the newsletter. Collect all the clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for the prize.

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

August Newsletter clue: What is the “Hither and Yon” section of the August Newsletter about?

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Hither and Yon

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

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Ten Daypack Essentials

“Be prepared.” These words of wisdom have been echoed by scout leaders, guides, and seasoned outdoor lovers for generations. It’s true. Weather can change quickly and the unexpected can happen. To manage the risk, add these essentials to your backpack before your next daytrip on the trail. (full descriptions can be found on the ViewRanger link. ViewRanger is a digital APP used for GPS navigation).

  1. Food – Don’t go hungry or skimp on calories.

  2. Water – 4-6 liters or water per day or more if you’re hiking in extreme heat.

  3. Torch or headlamp – It’s no fun to walk–er, stumble–in the dark.

  4. Fire starter – It’s darn near impossible to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together.

  5. Navigation – Map, compass, and app.

  6. Sun protection – Protect yourself with proper sunglasses, sunscreen, and sun hat.

  7. First-aid kit – Injuries may happen when you least expect it, so carry a compact first-aid kit.

  8. Knife – There are countless uses for a knife in the outdoors.

  9. Extra Clothing – Weather can change quick in the countryside and mountains. Pack layers.

  10. Shelter – If your daytrip is super ambitious, demands long hours or distances, or wanders into extreme conditions, consider carrying a lightweight bivvy sack or space blanket.

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….see you on the trails …

Stu

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CORE July 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Shuffleboard

We’ve done a slight rearrangement of roles on the Executive. Stu C. will take over the Communications Role including the Newsletter, and David v.d.E. will continue to contribute as a Member as Large.

Welcome Back Mike

Our friend and hiking companion Mike G. is back to resume his Executive Trip Coordinator duties, after undergoing a pretty serious medical procedure. At times I’m sure it was like dangling from a rope 1000 metres up and catching the tip of your pick axe in a precarious niche on the rock face. Welcome back Mike!

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

Car Pool Rates

With the ever escalating gas prices, the Executive has opted to raise the suggested amount to compensate the driver when you are car-pooling. Please follow these sliding-rate guidelines. The rate is for regular gas per KM round trip for the vehicle / number of people in the vehicle.

Gas above $1.30 per litre: $0.30 per km

Gas between $1:00 and $1.30 per litre: $0.25 per km

Gas below $1.00 per litre: $0.20 per km

For trips within one of the Mountain National Parks (Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Waterton, Yoho) passengers share equally with the driver the one-day entrance fee per car unless the fee is on a per person basis.
The final decision on prevailing gas prices is the Trip Coordinator’s (ie if prices are on the cusp and there is a disagreement between a driver and passenger on which rate should apply).
Remember the golden rule.  Your driver went out of their way to transport you safely on the outing, sometimes over dusty roads. If the car pool fee amounts to, say $13, you could round it up to an even $15 to help pay for a carwash.

For further information about CORE Carpooling guidelines, please visit the Carpooling and Locations page.

Monthly Presentations

We are fortunate to have monthly presentations at the Scarboro Community Centre planned right through to September, some by club members relating their adventures, some by very interesting outside presenters. Members and non-members alike are invited to attend. If YOU have an idea for a presenter who would be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar since our last newsletter. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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June 17 – Black Prince Cirque – Sun and Snow

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June 17 – Descent from Castle Mountain Lookout

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June 24 – Wind Ridge

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July 1 – Grass Pass

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July 14 – Upper Kananaskis Lake – Sarrail Creek Falls

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July 21 – Sibbald Lake Flora

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July 22 – Sherbrooke Lake and Mt Ogden from Paget trail

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July 28 – Centennial Ridge

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July 28 – Ribbon Creek to Troll Falls

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July 29 – Sunshine Meadows – The Lake Circuit

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NEWS & NOTES

Parking in the National Parks

Parks Canada has recently been strictly enforcing prohibitions on parking on the sides of several roads in Banff.  There is now a web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/Banffnow   which shows roughly current availability of parking at a large number of locations you can zoom in on.  The conditions are quite consistent, however, not varying much even on weekends.  The following guidelines may therefore be more useful when planning a trip:

In the cases of Lake Louise and Moraine Lake, road access to the lots is closed to avoid people circling around.  THIS MEANS THAT MORAINE LAKE IS INACCESSIBLE AFTER AROUND 8 AM, AND LOUISE AFTER AROUND 10:00, ALL DAYS OF THE WEEK—even as early visitors leave the parking lots largely empty.  It also means that Paradise Valley trailhead is inaccessible after 8 AM.  (Shuttle buses do not stop there.)

There are several other points to consider:

  • There are free shuttles from the Lake Louise Overflow Parking East of the town interchange to lakeside—BUT THIS LOT IS ALSO FILLED AS EARLY AS 11:00.
  • Louise shuttles run every 15 minutes but THE LAST BUS LEAVES LAKE LOUISE AT 5:30.
  • The Parks will apparently run free shuttles to Moraine Lake from the same overflow area in September—BUT CURRENTLY SHUTTLES ARE PRIVATELY OPERATING AT $25 ROUND TRIP.  Check with the Lake Louise info center for where they leave from, times, and possible need to book ahead.
  • Johnston’s Canyon and Upper Sulphur Hot Springs lots are also generally full by noon, and sometime also Lake Minniwanka.
  • Several other lots with yellow warning labels have NOT been shut so far (over 10 days in July).  This includes Yoho Valley, Emerald Lake, Bow Lake, Peyto Lake, Bourgeau Lake, Redearth Creek, Marble Canyon, and Stanley Glacier.  It is likely fine to plan trips there but early arrivals are recommended. 
  • The websites “last update” times are 24 hour format for EASTERN time, 2 hours ahead of us (i.e. later).  A second column is just a copy in AM/PM format but 4 hours ahead, meaning unknown.

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Hither and Yon

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

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A little inspirational hiking poetry

Tyler C Nelson  – Mt. Baldy
a misty start with worlds to go
a walk through forest, desert, snow
with altitude and dizzy joy
a challenge which my strength employs
a peaceful summit waiting warm
where thought and poetry find form
from near the sun our minds turn
to worlds below we will return

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….see you on the trails …

SC

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June 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

The AGM

CORE held its annual AGM on May 29 with a membership attendance of about 45 people. The business part of the meeting saw the election of a full slate of Executive members to guide the club for the coming year. See the “Meet your new Executive” paragraph below for your new executive members.

The members in attendance passed a motion to waive membership fees for the following year for Executive members who serve the full year on the Executive.

The minutes for the CORE 2018 AGM are available on the CORE website at this link.

The “social” part of the evening included recognition of the club members who have organized summer and winter events throughout the year, presenting of the “Chicken Mountain Award” for the leader of the hike most gone awry – Harvey earned the title  this year -, and a well laid out table of food and refreshments, again, thanks to our energetic and well organized past executive.

Renewing Your Membership

CORE’s new online membership and electronic payment APP has been very successful, with around 100 members signing up by the time of the AGM. A few memberships were submitted as paper hand-written forms at the AGM, but we hope in the future to keep these to a minimum to help streamline the membership signup process and, of course, save paper.

 

Trip Photography

July 2017 East End of Rundle Summit

One very successful feature at the AGM was a photo slide show with pictures from almost every outing from May 2017 to May 2018. There were 125 great photos of places and people to remember from the previous year’s activities, and this was only possible to compile thanks to the great photographs posted on the website by participants in the events. To all you club photographers, please keep up the good work, and remember to post your photos. It helps some of us remember where we’ve been, and certainly makes our club website more interesting.

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You could be the next Event Leader!

—In case you wondered, last season from June 2017 to May 2018,  CORE volunteers put on around 140 hiking, city walks, snowshoeing, skiing and cycling events, plus another 37 socials such as dinners, tennis, skating, slo-pitch, movies, music, Trail Fest, and CMC presentations. These don’t just happen. Last year there were just 10 members who put in most of the effort to organize events. It takes a bit of time but we could use some more volunteers to organize outings and keep the calendar populated with interesting activities. If you have some ideas about trails to explore, or if you would like to get some ideas from people who have done lots of trails, and would like volunteer to organize some trips, please contact executive at mailbox@corehike.org, talk to an event leader when you are out on a hike, or come to one of the CORE monthly meetings.

June 26, CORE Monthly Meeting

Cambodia, land of Angkor Wat, Mekong River, and the Famous “Tuks Tuks”

Mark June 26 on your calendar as long time member, Jeanette, takes us on a colourful journey through much of Cambodia, where she was joined by Harvey and Carol, other long time CORE members.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

May/June 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for mid May to mid June. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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May 19 – Tennis anyone?

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May 20 – Kananaskis – Terrace Trail

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May 25 Long Prairie Ridge and Macabee Creek Loop

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May 26 – Barrier Lookout

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May 29 – When shall we four meet again, at the next CORE AGM

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June 2 – A mountaineering K9 on Wasootch Ridge

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June 2 – Break time on Wasootch Ridge

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June 9 – Grotto Canyon

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Meet Your New Executive

For the 2018-2019 club year we have a full slate of Executive members whose goal is to ensure that activities are run safely, keep the membership informed about what is happening within the club, as well as in the wider outdoor community, organize training programs and presentations, and maintain the website so we can continue to provide online information and the events calendar for the club. Here is your executive for the coming year:

Chair – Julia Trangeled

Julia is a longtime CORE member and has served may times on the Executive. She is an avid summer and winter activity participant, and is one of the organizers of weekend events, as well as weekday evening urban hikes.

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Co-Chair – Jeanette Nelder

Jeanette hails from Kiwi land and is also a long time member of the club and has served several time on the Executive. She is an efficient organizer.

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Treasurer – Craig Morris

Craig has taken on the task of treasurer for the second year now and has been key to getting our online membership payment  system up and running.

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Secretary – Laura Hood

Laura is new to the Executive this year and has volunteered to take on the role of Secretary. After participating in many enjoyable core outings, she felt it was time to get more involved to ensure the good times continue.

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Membership Coordinator – Marian Smith

Marian also has been a member of CORE for many years and has served on the Executive before. This year she has volunteered to take on one of the more challenging executive positions, that of Membership Coordinator. Thank you Marian.

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Executive Trip Coordinator – Mike Galbraith

Mike has been around the club for a long time and has filled various roles on the executive in the past. He is also a member of the Calgary Mountain Club, as well as serving on the executive of the UIAA – the international federation for climbing and mountaineering, so he knows a little bit about safety in the mountains. His role is to monitor and coach our volunteer event organizers to ensure basic practices are followed to keep participants safe on the trails.

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Communications Coordinator – David van den Eikof

Dave is an avid summer season hiker and event organizer for some of the more difficult terrain in the mountains. He too has spent more than his fair share of time on the executive in various roles. He is also a keen photographer and amateur artist.

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Presentations Coordinator – Kim Payne

Kim has been in the club for a few years, and spent her first year on the executive getting our club banner (as in physical banner) and an excellent first aid training course that year. This year she means to line up some interesting presenters for our month-end club meetings.

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Website Administrator – Stu Cox

Stu hails originally from the east coast, so came to mountain pursuits rather late. He is now a great believer in the slogan you see on the sign entering Yoho National Park – “The mountains shall set you free”-. Somehow he fell into the role of CORE Webmaster about 8 years ago, and has so far been unable to convince anyone else to take on the task.

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Member at Large – Kevin Jones

Kev moved from the UK, with Sarah, in 2012 to take advantage of the mountains without having to fly transatlantic to do so.  He has been a member of CORE for about four years, and enjoys hiking in the summer and tries to find time for cross country skiing, downhill skiing and snowshoeing in the winter.  Having joined the Executive for the first time at the 2018 AGM he is wondering what is really involved in being a ‘Member at Large’.  So if you have a suggestion or constructive criticism that you want to feed into the Executive, Kev is a point of contact for you.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Tick bite prevention during tick season

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard, city parks and paths.

Some of the best ways to avoid tick bites are: wear clothing that covers your arms and legs; tuck your pants into your socks or even put tape around openings in clothing so ticks have no access; and wear light-colored clothing to help you see if a tick is on you. When you are in the woods, keep to the centre of the trail, where ticks are less likely to be (ticks tend to stay in shrubs and bushes).

Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin.

  • As soon as you are home, check yourself or have a family member help check you for ticks. Use a fine-tooth comb through your hair and check folds of the skin. You should also shower and wash your clothes at a high heat so any ticks are killed.

The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses are:

Fever/chills 
With all tick-borne diseases, patients can experience fever at varying degrees and time of onset.

Aches and pains 
Tick-borne disease symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity and time of onset of these symptoms can depend on the disease and your personal tolerance level.

Rash 
Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia can result in distinctive rashes

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

Charming Spring © Patricia L. Cisco

Reminiscent melodies
serenade the morning breeze.

Feathered creatures nest with care
in cherry blossoms pink and fair.

Perfumed scent of roses flow.
Tiny blades of green grass grow.

Misty showers soak the earth,
glorious colors come to birth.

Gathering clouds come and go,
rain, sun, and vibrant bow.

Dainty petals, fancy flair,
dancing in the warm, sweet air.

Violets, yellows, purest white,
graceful, gentle, welcomed sight.

Thank you, oh sweet lovely Spring,
patiently waiting the charms you bring!

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/charming-spring

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For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

….see you on the trails …

SC

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