April CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Nominee at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a few positions available for nominations (i.e., Presentations Coordinator, Communications Coordinator and Membership Coordinator). If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Other Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has recently learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline for Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the coming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

REMINDER: CORE’S BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

For further details please visit the Kananaskis Trails website at: http://kananaskistrails.com/ha-ling-upgrade/2018/

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

March/April 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 21 – April 14. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

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March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

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March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoe Gang

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April 1 – Chester to Sawmill snowshoe – Admiring the View Across Valley

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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April 14 – Chris, Ewa and Geoff on Sulphur Mountain Trail

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April 14 – Harvey, Ewa and David at Sulphur Mtn. Summit

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APRIL MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14 Avenue S.W.

Tuesday, April 24   7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Presentation: Tour of South Africa: Cities, Parks, Flora and Fauna

Please join us for our April Monthly Meeting. Following club announcements and updates, our presentation will feature a South African adventure. In 2016 Julia, a long time CORE member, took a trip to South Africa via Dubai.
Going from Dubai, a high end, over-the-top city, to relaxing Cape Town, was a study in contrasts, but both were fascinating in their own way. Table Mountain was a sight to see (on a non-cloudy day). A trip via the beautiful Garden Route led along the coast to Plettenburg Bay and then to the safari park to see “the big 5”, the most amazing enclosed bird sanctuary and a town built on canals. Incredible mountain scenery led through ‘ostrich country’ with enormous caverns, to Stellenbosch in the wine region outside Cape Town where the wines and the scenery vie for first place.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Grizzly Population Stable in K-Country

According to the latest DNA census in Alberta’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

An excerpt from Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

Bears Coming Out of their Dens

Parks Canada confirmed the first sighting of a grizzly bear on March 24 along the Bow Valley Parkway. It’s believed to be male grizzly 122 – also known as The Boss – the largest, toughest and most dominant grizzly bear in Banff, Yoho and Kootenay national parks.

Keep Your Dog on a Leash

BANFF – Keep your dogs on a leash protest song is barking at off-leash pooch walkers in Banff National Park.

It’s illegal to feed, disturb or entice any wildlife in national parks and because an off-leash dog can aggressively confront wildlife such as grizzly bears and elk, there are strict regulations in place. For some further background information about the rules and some Banff local musicians’ efforts to spread the word, please visit this Rocky Mountain Outlook page.

http://www.rmoutlook.com/article/Protest-song-urges-dog-owners-to-keep-pets-leashed-20180412

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment and Parks  https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…These names may bring back happy memories growing up on a farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites, or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes: bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we might drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

10 Suggested Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

CORE Event Coordinators – Try to add some of these hikes to the club calendar this spring

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle

    View from Tunnel Mountain

  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake
  • Johnston Canyon
  • Lake Louise Lakeshore

For more information on these hikes, visit:

https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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March CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Volunteer at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a couple of positions available for nominations. If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Calgary Ski Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline – Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

 

REMINDER: CORE’s BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

February/March 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for ?????  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek Trail

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

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March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

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March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoers

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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????? Chester to Sawmill – Admiring the View across the Valley

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FEBRUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Members and Guests – Please join us at Scarboro Community Centre, 1737 – 14th Avenue S.W. Tuesday, March 27, 7:00 p.m.

Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks

Following club announcements and updates, our guest presenter will be Dale Leckie, author of a recently published book called Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks.

An award-winning geologist and best-selling author, Dale will guide you through the Canadian Rocky Mountain National Parks. The story of the Rockies, its rivers and valleys, glaciers and hot springs, caves and karst, mountain building and erosion unfolds.

With eye-catching illustrations and photographs, this presentation blends story telling with science and natural beauty with easy to understand explanations. Be prepared to be amazed by the story written in the Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers. Dale’s book will be available for sale. You can pay with cash or credit card. The cost is $28.00 cash and Dale pays the GST. If a credit card is used, the cost is $27.95 plus GST.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

 

According to the latest DNA census in the province’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

 

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment & Parks (https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/)

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…The names may bring back happy memories growing up on the farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes; bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

10 Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle
  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake

 

For more information on these hikes, visit: https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

 

 

 

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW


 

 

 

 

….see you on the trails …

CM

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February 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Missed the January meeting at the Norseman Outdoor Specialists store?

Here are some highlights:

Roughly 25 members filled the Norseman store on a cold January night (Jan. 30) to learn about snowshoeing and the “true definition of winter” from Justin Howse, the store’s operations manager. We learned:

  • Winter conditions can exist even on a cold summer day (due to elements such as wind and rain). Always dress appropriately and be prepared for “winter-like” conditions.
  • Be aware of your surroundings when you are snowshoeing or x-c skiing (and make good decisions, such as not having lunch in an avalanche runoff zone or beneath a snow-covered slope).
  • In winter, have a wick-away layer next to your skin, followed by a warm layer (such as fleece), and a soft shell jacket on the top. For more warmth, add another layer to the “middle” layer, rather than put on a hard shell jacket that may be rain-proof but doesn’t breathe.
  • When going up and down hills on snowshoes, Justin suggests trying a “herringbone” technique when ascending, and a “snowplough” stance, similar to downhill skiing, when descending (being careful not to cross the tip of one snowshoe over the other).

Embracing an Unusual Winter with “CORE Enthusiasm”

Swishing along ski trails, gliding through snow laden forests, exploring pristine landscapes on snowshoes…CORE’s winter season has featured many well-attended trips, fabulous snow conditions (and, admittedly, a few frosty days)…. all mixed with lots of fun and adventure in the outdoors. Thanks to Cheryl, Lynn, Harvey, Carol, Mary, Pat, Julia Tsang, Katherine, Stu, John R., Anne-Marie, Julia Trangeled, David T., Edna, Cathie, Sarah, David M., and Pam for posting events and courses this winter. (Sorry if we missed anyone!)

 

Carpooling Contributions – A Suggestion from the Executive

CORE’s current carpool formula ($0.20 x total distance of trip divided by the number of people in the vehicle – including driver) was devised a number of years ago when gas prices were somewhat lower. With gas prices fluctuating like a yoyo and being fairly unpredictable in recent months, the executive would like to suggest the following:

If gas prices are higher than $1.15 at the time of a CORE trip, drivers can consider requesting a donation based on $0.25, rather than $0.20. (E.g., $0.25 x total distance of trip divided by the number of people in the vehicle). We will leave it up to the discretion of the drivers.

Interested in Volunteering for CORE?

There are many ways that members can contribute to CORE:

  • volunteer for the 2018-2019 executive (as a registered society we must fill four important positions: Chairperson, Secretary, Treasurer and Membership, or risk having to dissolve the club);
  • coordinate events (either in the city or in the mountains);
  • volunteer to give a presentation at a monthly meeting or suggest ideas for future presentations (send an email to mailbox@corehike.org);
  • nominate someone for the Chicken Mountain Award (send an email to mailbox@corehike.org);
  • make suggestions or comments via mailbox@corehike.org

CORE sponsored “Buy and Sell” Event

Watch for further details in next month’s newsletter about a “Buy and Sell” event that CORE’s executive committee is planning for the April 2018 meeting.

March’s Monthly Meeting

On March 27th, Dale Leckie, author of Rocks, Ridges and Rivers: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks, will give a slideshow on the geology of the Canadian Rockies, without referencing a lot of difficult-to-understand geological terms.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

January/February 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 18 – February 11. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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January 20 – Evan Thomas Creek snowshoe

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January 21 – Pristine scenery along Braille Trail

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January 27 – Lusk Creek snowshoers brave the cold

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January 27 – A wintery wonderland at Lake Louise

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January 28 – Boulton Bridge-Elk Pass-Fox Creek ski

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February 10 – Pat, Laz, and Susan – snowshoeing at Confederation Park

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February 10 – Happy skiers at Peter Lougheed Provincial Park

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February 11 – Is Geoff really up to his waist in snow?

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February 11 – Chris after a close encounter with the snow

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FEBRUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Members and Guests – Please join us at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Avenue S.W. Tuesday, February 27, 7:00 p.m.

A Tour of Ancients Civilizations by One of our Own “Ancients”

In 2017, Mike (a long-time CORE member) travelled to Egypt (March), Greece (July) and Cyprus (November). He will show some pyramids, sailing up the Nile, then move on to the Greek tour of Athens, Algina, Eleusis, Meteora, Delph, Corinth, Mycenae, Epidaurus, Hydra, Patmos, Ephesus (in Turkey), Samos and back to Athens. Finally, a brief visit to Cyprus – Kouklia and Paphos.

In the Greek part, Mike will talk about several of the ancient monuments (not including himself), Greek art, dancing, walking, food, drink, sunsets and cats (there are a lot of cats in Greece).

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

NON-CORE EVENT

Nikki Heim – March 15, 2018: Wolverine Populations in South-Central Alberta 

Join the Friends of Kananaskis as Nikki reveals when the fierce wolverine meets its match, providing a glimpse into factors influencing a declining population in Kananaskis Country.

University of Calgary – Science Theatres ST 135, 527 Campus Place NW

Time: 7:00pm – 8:00pm

General Admissions – $5 Suggested Donation – No Pre-Show Ticket Sales

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 A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

NON-CORE EVENT

Fundraiser Event – Great Divide Trail Association

– Mar 15

A journey of adventure, discovery & survival

An evening of stories with Brian Keating, as he takes the audience on a high energy adventure through some of the major mountain ranges of the world. Brian Keating is a regular on CBC Homestretch and was awarded the 2017 Stan Hodgkiss Canadian Outdoorsperson of the Year Award by the Canadian Wildlife Federation. Brian is a wildlife advocate, a pilot, scuba diver and mountaineer and has hiked, explored and advocated for wildlife across the globe, including Canada’s own Great Divide Trail.

All profits from the event will be invested in the completion and environmental protection of the Great Divide Trail.

Tickets:
Regular:  $30.00, Students:  $15.00

The Details:
When:  Thursday, March 15, 7:00 – 9:00pm, doors open at 6:30pm
Where:  John Dutton Theatre, 616 Macleod Trail Southeast, Calgary
How to Get a Ticket:  Click here:  Tickets available on eventbrite

Please share this info with others and help us spread the word about our event with Brian Keating!

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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JANUARY CORE NEWSLETTER

EXECUTIVE CORNER

January CORE Meeting Moved to Norseman Outdoor Specialists Shop

Due to renovations at Scarboro Community Hall, we were forced to find an alternative location. The Norseman Outdoor Specialists shop (formerly the Norseman Ski & Hike shop) came to our rescue and offered their store for the meeting. See further details below.

Cross Country Ski Lessons Deemed a Success

The executive would like to thank those members who participated in the subsidized x-c ski lessons on Jan. 7 and Jan. 14. Those who took the lessons all agreed that U of C Outdoor Centre instructor, Steven, was excellent and that they had learned some valuable skills for improving their skiing.

CORE Makes Donation to West Bragg Creek Greater Trails Association

Many CORE members enjoy x-c skiing and snowshoeing at West Bragg Creek during the winter, as well as hiking and biking there in the summer. The West Bragg Creek Greater Trails Association, which maintains and track sets the ski trails in this recreation area, recently expanded the parking lots and installed new washrooms and a warming hut. The association depends primarily on donations to maintain the ski trails in top condition. For these reasons, the executive has decided to donate $100 to the WBCGTA.

CORE Featured in 10hikes.com Calgary Hiking Clubs Blog

In late 2017, CORE was contacted by a fellow named Adam Hayman who writes for a website called 10hikes.com. He asked if he could interview one of our members to obtain information about the club so he could feature CORE in a section called Calgary Hiking Clubs.

CORE was selected as one of three local clubs featured in the blog. The other two were Slow and Steady and Fifth Dimension (a seniors club). To read what Adam wrote about CORE (and the other clubs), click on this link https://10hikes.com/calgary-hiking-clubs/

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November 2017 – January 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for November 26 to January 14. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

December 2 – Jeanette and Mary on Paint Pots Trail


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December 9 – Hard to believe this is a winter hike – Nose Hill

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November 26 – Taking a Break on Tunnel Mountain

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November 26 – Hanging out at the Banff Centre after Tunnel Mountain

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December 17 – Marushka Lake group

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December 17 – Harvey and Laura – Marushka Lake hike

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December 16 – Pat, the Famous Ice Climber

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December 16 – Guess Who?

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December 24 – A Beautiful Day near Lower Kananaskis Lake

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January 7 – Mila, Pat and Laura – CORE Ski Lesson

 

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January 3 – Logger’s Loop Group Photo

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January 13 – Cathy and David ready to Skate

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January 13 – Group looking energetic before challenging ski to Lookout

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January 14 – Julia, Carol, Dave, Anne-Marie, Noreen and Bob – Ski Lesson

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JANUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Norseman Outdoor Specialists Store

4655 – 37 Street S.W. (Park in shopping mall across street but need to register your vehicle’s licence  number in the machine; or park on the street)

TUESDAY, January 30, 2018, 7:00 pm

Members and Guests: Please join us for our January meeting at the Norseman Outdoor Specialists shop.

Our presentation will be:

Winter Safety and Snowshoeing Skills

Snowshoeing is a wonderful winter activity that can, at times, be underestimated when it comes to safety. Justin Howse – a certified hiking guide – will be discussing the common issues and fitting troubles with snowshoes, along with skills and techniques to make snowshoeing more enjoyable. He will also be covering winter safety related to snowshoeing in the Rockies. Understanding what avalanche terrain looks like, what “Winter” actually is, along with equipment to consider for snowshoe travel will be discussed.

Justin is an instructor with the Outdoor Council of Canada, and a professional with the Interpretive Guides Association. He is also experienced as a wilderness first responder and has wilderness survival training. He is currently the operations manager at Norseman Outdoor Specialists.  

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Annual Christmas Bird Counts Originally Started for a “Sinister” Reason

Did you know that Christmas bird counts are done throughout North America and in some tropical areas in Central America, northern South America, the Caribbean and the Pacific Islands? The activity began well over a century ago in the U.S. as a protest of an existing Christmas tradition in which teams competed to see who could shoot the most birds and other animals in one day.

Friends of Kananaskis Speaker Series

University of Calgary – Science Theatres ST 135

527 Campus Place NW

Time: 7:00pm – 8:00pm

General Admissions – $5 Suggested Donation – No Pre-Show Ticket Sales

Megan Evans – January 25, 2018: The Buzz About Native Bees

Did you know there are over 300 species of native bees in Alberta? Come learn all about the different bees, how and where they live and what you can do to help promote native bees in your own backyard

Christian Stenner – February 15, 2018: The Caves of Kananaskis and Beyond

Christian will discuss the captivating pursuit of cave exploration and some of his international expeditions and contribution to scientific research along the way.

Nikki Heim – March 15, 2018: Wolverine Populations in South-Central Alberta 

Join the Friends of Kananaskis as Nikki reveals when the fierce wolverine meet its match, providing a glimpse into factors influencing a declining population in Kananaskis Country.

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 A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Free National Park Passes in 2017 Hailed as a Success by Parks Canada

An excerpt from the Banff Crag & Canyon Newspaper

The popular year-long program allowing visitors to enter Banff National Park for free has earned more than a passing grade from Parks Canada.

“Initial worries that the free entry promotion would result in massive overcrowding – with resulting damage to both the natural habitat and wildlife – proved groundless thanks to a carefully planned focus on urging visitors to use public transit much more than in previous years,” according to Banff National Parks visitor experience manager, Greg Danchuk.

“We feel 2017 was a great success here in Banff National Park.”

According to Danchuk, there was a weekend transit service from Calgary that carried 11,000 people to the park during just 27 days of service – that’s a lot of cars not on the road. Once people arrived, regular shuttle services provided a way to get around Banff town site or to travel to Lake Louise.

Parks Canada is now looking at future options, but say that they have learned a lot this year and that the experience in 2017 should help make things better in the future when it comes to moving people from Calgary to Banff.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Cave and Basin book offers context, clarity on history of Banff hot springs

Banff historian, E.J. (Ted) Hart has written a new book called Cave and Basin: Banff’s hot springs and the birth of Canada’s national parks. While relatively brief at 96 pages, Hart’s book is welcome as it is the authoritative record of the hot springs. Hart has pulled together a remarkable amount of detail on a subject that has been shoved on the sidelines for many years.

He begins his story with the Indigenous people of the Rocky Mountains and southern Alberta, placing their story into the context of the hot springs. Surprisingly, the first non-Indigenous person to make note of the springs was explorer James Hector, according to Hart. After Hector, the next people to come across the springs were prospectors Joe Healy (Healy Pass) in 1873 and Willard Burrell Younge in 1875.

By the time, railway workers, Frank McCabe and brothers, Tom and William McCardell discovered the hot springs in the fall of 1883, the hot springs had already been “discovered” at least three times, if not more, says author Hart.

The book is published by Banff-based Summerthought.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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Pat’s Awesome Ice Climbing Adventure

After seeing a Calgary Mountain Club ice climbing presentation with Will Gadd (awesome mountaineer/ice climber/nice man), Harvey and I thought it would be a great idea to take an ice climbing course.  I had no climbing experience at all, but what the hey? Soooo I posted a class from the U of C on the CORE calendar and had 2 other people sign up.  Yes!”

Pat kitted up for Ice Climbing

On the day of the practical climb it was super early in the morning as we met near Canmore at 7:15. It was pitch black out, really windy and cold and we all wondered what we were thinking when we agreed to do this.

After CORE members Uszula, Kevin, Harv and Pat met the rest of our group, 11 in total, we drove on to King’s Creek in Kananaskis Park where we proceeded to get ready for our adventure.  It was still early, still pitch black outside and a fairly nippy -10 C.

We then proceeded to hike over fallen trees and icy streams to our destination.  Once there we had a chat about where to go to the bathroom (men on one side of the falls, women on the other).  We put on our harness, crampons and helmets – some of us were better as this than others – yes, I admit I had trouble with getting the equipment on, like, a lot. We did a few practice runs on footing and how to use an ice pick. Then it was time to get climbing.

Harv chipping his way up the icecycle

We had two instructors from the U of C – Patrick and Larry.  Both were really helpful, and very knowledgeable. We practiced throughout the day, the only real issue being that it was fairly chilly but most of us had dressed appropriately so that wasn’t too much of a problem.  I took a spill on the falls but that’s why you have ropes, so it was no big deal. It was a bit like going down a long slide and actually quite fun.  One person got hit in the face with a bit of ice but otherwise there were no injuries, not even an ice pick dropped on someone’s head, which was a distinct possibility.

Around 4:30 it was time to pack up and I have to confess I was ready to depart, since I was a bit chilled and definitely getting tired and we still had to hike back to the cars.  The way back seemed to be much harder for some reason, but luckily I had a few helping hands to get me over the icy parts.  I also got a chance to talk with Patrick who shared with me his love of the mountains and stories about some of his adventures. Then it was time to say goodbye which is always a bit sad – got hugs from Larry and Patrick – and got gratefully into the warm car.

If anyone is interested in taking this course I can highly recommend it, even if you have no previous experience it was well worth it.

By Pat Ranger

CORE Member Extraordinaire

 

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November CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Mountain Equipment Co-0p Discount Night for CORE members 

Thursday, November 23, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Start your Christmas Shopping Early!

Please bring your CORE membership card to MEC (830 – 10 Avenue S.W.) to receive a wristband and be eligible for a 10% discount on all your purchases that evening.  At 7:30, there will be a short winter layering and clothing demonstration.  Coordinators for the evening are David and Edna. If you have any questions, please consult the CORE calendar for their contact information.

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Peterman Fund X-Country Ski Lessons 

The executive is arranging for X-C ski lessons for CORE members in January. This training will be partially paid for by the Branko Peterman Endowment Fund. Please watch the CORE calendar for details.

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Getting Ready for Winter Adventures

The club is currently gearing up for a winter season of snowshoeing, x-country skiing and hopefully downhill skiing. In the next few days more trips will be added to the calendar, but members are invited and encouraged to post additional events, outings and activities for CORE. Please contact Pat, our Executive Trip Coordinator, if you have any questions about coordinating or if you would like to co-coordinate with an experienced coordinator. Her email address is listed on the Executive Contact page; click on the Resources tab on the website (second item from the bottom on the drop down menu).

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UPDATE: December 1- 3 Annual Christmas Weekend at Castle Mountain Chalets

With the holiday season approaching, so is our annual Christmas weekend at Castle Mountain chalets, December 1st to 3rd. There are already 16 of us signed up. There is both a snowshoe and a cross-country ski outing scheduled for each day. We will do appetizers on Friday evening around 7:00 p.m. in the adjacent chalets and our traditional potluck is scheduled for Saturday evening. People coming for the day from Calgary are welcome to join in. The four rooms in the adjacent chalets are taken, so new reservations should be made directly with Castle Mountain chalets. Do not forget to mention the 20% discount for CORE members. Looking forward to a great weekend.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October/November 2017

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for October 22 to November 12. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

October 22 – Canoe Meadows to Widow Maker hike

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October 28 – Terrace Trail South

 

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October 31 – Hallowe’en Pumpkin Creations

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November 5 – Winter hiking at Glenbow Ranch

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November 11 – Johnston Canyon Upper Falls

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November 11 – Chicken Checking Trail Sign

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November 12 – Hiking the Friendship Trail

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NOVEMBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY, November 28, 2017, 7:00 pm

Annual Christmas Meeting and Party

All members are invited to our Annual Christmas Meeting and Party, our final meeting for 2017. The evening will begin with a special program — a slideshow of winter activities from the past few years followed by “CORE’s Got Talent,” featuring a performance by the talented CORE executive.

You’ll be invited to reveal your talents during a Christmas quiz (and perhaps win a prize). The night will end with a Christmas fete (a delectable buffet, ample Christmas cheer and festive music) to put everyone in the Christmas mood. This year, we’ll be serving drinks and munchies during our official program, after which the full buffet and social festivities will begin.

We are hoping for as many members as possible to come together for our last social of the year to celebrate the Christmas season and mingle with your fellow hikers, so be sure to come along and join in the fun.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Raccoon-spotting in Banff – a Rare Thing, Indeed!

Raccoon eating corn

Did you know that raccoons are not normally seen in Banff National Park? This fall a raccoon was spotted in the Banff townsite which prompted Parks Canada to begin tracking the animal on remote cameras. The problem, according to Parks Canada, is that the raccoon is not a native species in Banff and could cause damage to the ecosystem. Raccoons are normally found in southwestern Alberta. According to Alberta Fish and Wildlife, in the wild raccoons feed on fruits, nuts, berries and insects, and foods that can be found near water such as fish, birds, eggs and frogs. They are omnivores that can easily adapt to whatever food sources are available

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Another Year Older

This month CORE turns 18, a mere teenager in comparison to other clubs that have been around for a number of decades, such as the Calgary Ski Club, the Rocky Mountain Ramblers and the Calgary Weekend Hikers.

Since 1999, CORE has had it share of growing pains, as it evolved from its infancy into an adolescent. Some of the attributes that have kept CORE going are: dedicated coordinators, friendships that have developed, the adventures that have nourished our spirits, and the sense of community and commonality that comes from spending time in nature. Let’s hope that we can grow strong and tall as we approach adulthood in two years. And still be going strong when we turn 30.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Will 2017-2018 be a “La Nina” year?

La Niña means The Little Girl in Spanish. La Niña is also sometimes called El Viejoanti-El Niño, or simply “a cold event.

The impacts of La Niña on the global climate tend to be opposite those of El Niño. During a La Niña year, winter temperatures are warmer than normal in the southeast and cooler than normal in the northwest. La Niña usually brings colder winters to the Canadian west and Alaska, and drier, warmer weather to the American southeast.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists are “predicting” that a La Niña will form this winter, but this is not a certainty. Right now, they’re saying there’s a 55-65 percent chance. For it to officially be a La Niña year, the sea surface temperature needs to hold at least 0.5 degrees below average for three months.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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October CORE newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

On-line Membership Sign-up and Electronic Payment Now Up & Running

Next time you want to renew your CORE membership, you will be able to do so on-line, using your credit card or PayPal. Thanks to invaluable help from CORE member Steve Hashman, we now have on-line membership sign-up and payment capability. Check out the new on-line form and waiver on the Join Now page.

Upcoming CORE Presentations for 2018

Join us at the Scarboro Community Centre for the following presentations in the New Year:

January 30 – Snowshoeing 101 – Justin Howse from Norseman Ski Shop will give a comprehensive talk on snowshoe equipment, snowshoeing techniques and safety while snowshoeing.

March 27 – Author Dale Leckie will give a slideshow on his new book, Rocks, Rivers and Ridges – Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Park.

April 24 – CORE member, Mike G., will share his recent trips to Egypt, Greece and Turkey.

June 26 – (tentatively) – CORE member, Jeanette N., will share her recent travels in Cambodia.

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December 1- 3 Annual Christmas Weekend at Castle Mountain Chalets

For the past four or five years, CORE members have been gathering in the mountains on the first weekend in December for an early Christmas get together. Over the weekend, we snowshoe, cross country ski and downhill ski. More adventurous members have been known to back country ski. Check the CORE calendar for more details about the weekend. Over the coming weeks, the activities will be posted with further information.

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Discount for CORE members at Norseman Ski and Hike Shop

CORE members are currently entitled to show their membership cards at the Norseman Ski and Hike Shop on 37 Street S.W. and get a 10% discount on hiking and skiing apparel and equipment. There may be some restrictions to this offer, such as no discount on sale items, etc. This offer is definitely good for the rest of 2017, and may be extended into 2018.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September/October 2017

Between September 11 and October 22, CORE’s calendar featured eight hikes, one bike & hike, three urban hikes, one potluck picnic hike, and a social dining evening.  Thanks to the following coordinators for posting these events: Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Carol, Cathie, John, Cliona, Cheryl, Kiyoko and Sarah.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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September 16 – Annual Memorial Hike

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September 23 –  A snowy day at Upper Meadow (Burstall Pass)

 

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September 23 – CORE gang on Powderface and Prairie Creek Loop

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September 24 – Brilliant blues and autumn foliage of Glenmore Reservoir

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September 24 – Kiyoko and her group on Wasootch Ridge

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September 26 – Pat with Gillean and Tony Daffern after CORE meeting

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September 28 – Happy hikers on 12 Mile Coulee urban walk

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September 30 – Spectacular view of Hailstone Butte from Windy Peak

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October 9 – Getting ready to hike Jack Hill and Jill Hill

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October 22 – Roasting sausages over the fire

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OCTOBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 31 October, 2017, 7:00 pm

Halloween Potluck, Party and Pumpkins!

Halloween Party

Join us at 7:00 p.m. at the Scarboro Community Centre for a Halloween Celebration featuring an Appetizer Potluck, Pumpkin Carving and Decorating, and Music for your listening and dancing pleasure! Beverages will be provided by CORE. Please bring a contribution to the potluck (e.g., appetizers, finger food, munchies, sandwiches, desserts, Halloween treats). Also, bring your own pumpkin, then put on your creative cap and take part in the pumpkin decorating and/or carving event.  CORE will supply lots of decorating materials but you are welcome to bring your own. CORE will also provide four pumpkins for those who are not able to bring their own.  If you prefer to carve your pumpkin, don’t forget your carving tools! We encourage everyone to wear at least one Halloween accessory, or a full costume, or wear black and orange.

 

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NATURE NEWS & “NOTES”

SNOWSHOES:

Come to our January 30 meeting to hear Justin Howse of the Norseman Ski Shop talk about snowshoes, and how to buy the right type. In the meantime, here are some tips for choosing snowshoes for your winter outings.

Cheryl and Katherine

Snowshoe Sizing

Snowshoe size is a key factor in getting the right amount of flotation. Generally, the heavier the person or the lighter and drier the snow, the more snowshoe surface area is required. Snowshoe size also depends on the type of activity you intend to do. For deep powder, a longer, wider snowshoe would be the most effective, but heavier and more tiring to use. Keep in mind that on CORE snowshoeing trips you are often on a trail where someone else has already “broken trail,” in which case you can use a smaller, narrower snowshoe – much easier and less tiring.

Men’s vs Women’s Gear 

Men’s snowshoes are designed to accommodate larger boots and heavier loads. For example, aluminum-frame snowshoes come in multiple sizes, usually 8″ x 25″, 9″ x 30″ and 10″ x 36″ or something similar. Women’s snowshoes tend to feature narrower, more contoured frame designs and sizes down to 8″ x 21″. Their bindings are sized to fit women’s footwear.

Easy-to-Fasten Bindings 

Make sure the bindings fit the boots you are going to be wearing, and that the fasteners are heavy duty (so they won’t break) and easy to secure and adjust.

Snowshoe Traction Devices 

Snowshoes for rolling or mountain terrain will come with toe crampons that rotate under the front of your foot to aid in climbing hills. Heel crampons are in a V shape and slow you down when descending hills. Look for both for casual snowshoeing in the Rockies. Some more rugged snowshoes may also have side rails (also called traction bars) to prevent slipping when crossing steep slopes.

Heel lifts

Also known as climbing bars, these are wire bails that can be flipped up under your heels to relieve calf strain on steep uphill sections and save energy on long ascents.

Watch this YouTube video for some further useful snowshoeing tips.

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OUTDOOR TRACTION DEVICES:

Highly Recommended by CORE for Winter Hikes and Outings

Kahtoola MICROspikes:

Cheryl with MICROspikes

Although the Kahtoola MICROspikes ($85 at MEC – October 2017) are perhaps a bit too aggressive for regular around-town sidewalk use, they are a good choice for all-purpose go-to option for longer hikes in mixed snow and icy conditions. Despite heavy use and abuse on everything from frozen streets to icy backcountry trails, they perform flawlessly and are incredibly durable. As a further testament, Backpacker magazine awarded the MICROspikes one of their 2012 Editors’ Choice Gold Awards, which honors exceptional outdoor gear that has withstood the test of time.

 ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip:

A more recent entry into the field, the ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip ($49 at MEC, $55 at Atmosphere – October 2017) are a slightly different, slightly less aggressive take on the MICROspikes. They slip on using a similar stretchy rubber harness system, but instead of short, sharp vertical teeth underfoot, they use a lower-profile multi-toothed chain for grip. This will be the third season they’ve been available and they have been garnering some excellent reviews.

ICEtrekkers Diamond Grip

YakTrax Extreme (XTR) Ice Cleats:

Yaktrax XTR Ice Cleats ($29.99 at Sport Check and Atmosphere – October 2017) provide good traction on snow and ice. Their spike design enhances traction while preventing snow build up with its unique anti-snow pack plate. They appear to be a lighter, less heavy-duty version of MICROspikes, with 10 spikes on the bottom, as opposed to 12 on the MICROspikes.  They have good and bad reviews on Amazon; one reviewer says that they are not sized correctly.

TIP: When buying any outdoor traction device, make sure that you buy them large enough to fit the boots that you will be wearing most often when using the spikes or cleats (which could be a size larger than your walking shoes).

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ARTICLES & BOOKS and WEBSITES WORTH NOTING

The most underrated endurance workout? Hiking.

“There’s something special about moderately paced movement through nature that leaves one feeling refreshed, renewed, and satisfied. Because of that, hiking is rarely considered a sport in the same way as trail running or mountain biking, both of which are more acutely painful and taxing on the body. And yet recent studies show that a walk in the woods—especially at the right tempo—is a superb way to build endurance and strength.”

For a study published earlier this year in the journal PLOS One, a team of researchers affiliated with the University of Innsbruck in Austria had individuals complete two three-hour workouts under distinct conditions. The first was a “fast walk” on an indoor treadmill; the second was an outdoor hike through mountains. In the treadmill condition, the incline settings were contrived to mimic the outdoor route as closely as possible, so that the physical strain of both scenarios would be similar. (The researchers could not force the treadmills to decline, so outdoor downhill segments became indoor flat segments.)

During and immediately following both workouts, the researchers collected physiological and psychological measures. What they found is interesting, a bit paradoxical, and fully in support of hiking.

For starters, participants pushed themselves harder during the outdoor hike, as evidenced by heart rates that were, on average, six beats per minute higher. Given this, you’d think the participants would have experienced the outdoor hike as more tiring and perhaps less enjoyable. But the opposite occurred: They reported increased feelings of pleasure both during and immediately following the outdoor hike, and they said they felt less fatigued afterward. Put differently, going hard while hiking in nature feels easier than going hard indoors.

(Sourced from the Alpine Club of Canada, Calgary Section Newsletter)

Tony and Gillean Daffern’s New Trailfinder Application

At our September meeting, Tony and Gillean Daffern, author and publisher of Kananaskis Trail Guides, introduced their new website which features their Trailfinder application. It’s worth checking out if you are looking for maps and information on trails.

http://kananaskistrails.com/trailfinder/trailfinder.html

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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September CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Seeking Ideas for Courses

The CORE executive is currently looking for ideas from the members about educational courses they would like to see in the future. If you have a suggestion for a course or courses that could be funded by the legacy Branko Peterman fund, please send your idea(s) to mailbox@corehike. org.

Stories are Coming in for Chicken Mountain Award (the CMA)

We now have two stories that have been submitted via mailbox@corehike.org for the Chicken Mountain Award. These, and other stories submitted to the mailbox over the year, will be revealed at the club’s AGM in May, where a winner of the award will be selected.

Progress is being made on On-line Membership Sign-up and Payment Capabilities

As announced at our August meeting, the executive is working to set up an on-line membership form and payment system to make membership renewal easier and more convenient. Stay tuned for further details!

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August/September 2017

Between August 19 and September 10, CORE’s calendar featured four different cycling events (mountain biking, road biking to the Gopher Hole Museum, urban biking around the entire city and city pathway biking through various parks). Also on the calendar were seven hikes in the mountains, two urban hikes, and a social dining evening.  Thanks to the following coordinators for posting these events: Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Anne-Marie, Dave V., Carol, and Cathie.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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August 19 – Pigeon Mountain Summit

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August 20 – Carol and Kiyoko – Outnumbered

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August 26 – Distant View from Sulphur Springs

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Sept. 2 – Heading off to hike the Wall Lake trail

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Sept. 2- Anne-Marie on Carthew Alderson trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept. 3 – Goat Haunt Group (Shoreline Hike)

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Sept. 3 – Bald Eagle seen from Waterton Tour Boat

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Sept. 6 – Mei, Geoff and Harvey embark on a long bike ride

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Sept. 10 – Signal Hill – Tuscany Biking group

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SEPTEMBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 26 September, 2017, 7:00 pm

Presentation: Authors and hikers Gillean and Tony Daffern – Kananaskis Country Trail Guide Series

Join us at 7:00 p.m. at the Scarboro Community Centre for a presentation by experienced hikers and authors Gillean and Tony Daffern. Gillean and Tony are the popular and well-known writers and publishers of the series, Kananaskis Country Trail Guides. Tony has also penned, Popular Dayhikes 2: Canadian Rockies as well as Backcountry Avalanche Safety. The presentation will include a review of the new Trailfinder on-line application, that Tony and Gillean have developed. Following that, Gillean will answer any questions we may have or discuss issues regarding the Kananaskis trails that we would like to raise. Here’s your chance to interact with the experts on K-Country.

The meeting will also include club announcements and updates.

Our October meeting, Tuesday, October 31, will land right on Hallowe’en night. Watch for announcements regarding the possibility of pumpkins and potluck!

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“NATURE” NEWS & NOTES

Add Raw Cacao to Your Trail Mix

Did you know that you can add unroasted broken cacao beans (also known as cacao nibs) to trail mixes or as toppings on dishes and desserts? According to an article in Rockies Health (Summer 2017 edition), cacao in its unprocessed, unroasted state has 119 times more antioxidant content than bananas, 20 times more than blueberries and four times more than its processed counterpart, dark chocolate. In addition, raw cacao powder can be blended into smoothies and other beverages (such as hot chocolate). To find out where to buy these products just Google them. It looks like Amazon, Walmart, Bulk Barn may be potential sources.

Banff and Canmore’s Bear 148

For those of you who have been following the saga of Bear 148 over the summer, here’s an update. This well-known grizzly was relocated out of Canmore on July 28 following several encounters with people in a heavily-used area, and moved 450 kilometres to a remote area of northwestern Alberta. According to the Rocky Mountain Outlook (Canmore’s weekly newspaper), a new GPS collar tracking 148’s movements shows that she has been criss-crossing back and forth between drainages in Alberta and B.C. but generally staying in the same area where she was released. She is most likely foraging on huckleberries in those drainages, according to provincial government sources.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

A Bird's Eye View

Hiking in an extreme fire ban area – A new experience for CORE members

The CORE group who participated in the recent Waterton Hiking Weekend quickly found out what it’s like to hike in an area being shut down and restricted hour by hour, initially due to extreme fire hazard and tinder dry conditions, and later due to an actual fire west of the national park – the Kenow Mountain Wildfire. We knew that certain trails would be closed before we left, but by the time we arrived in Waterton on Friday evening, the closure list had grown substantially. With limited trails still open, we were lucky to find two great hikes to do on Saturday (although one of them, Wall Lake, had a closure sign by the time we finished the hike, and the second one was closed the following day).

On Sunday, we were worried that no trails would be open and we’d end up renting paddle boards and eating ice cream along with the rest of the tourists. Fortunately, we had all brought our passports, so we hopped on a tour boat heading to Goat Haunt on the U.S. side of Waterton Lake. When we arrived back from the long hike along the shoreline, there was a letter attached to our motel door. Although not an evacuation alert per se, the letter warned us of a potential alert in the future. Despite the many challenges that the group faced, it ended up being a great weekend. Thanks to Anne-Marie for organizing it!

The fire recently spread into Waterton National Park, burned down the park’s visitor centre, and many people have been evacuated from southern Alberta communities.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

New Book Tackles the Complex Subject of Geology – Without Being Full of Technical Jargon

For those struggling to understand how the Rockies were made and shaped, there is a new book available that offers a friendly introduction to local geology. Primarily a driving guide, Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers: Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho, and Jasper National Parks is a 216-page guidebook, published by Broken Poplars, and written by Calgary geologist Dale Leckie. Launched in Calgary at Shelf-Life Books on July 26, Leckie’s book focuses on the geology of the main highways of Banff, Yoho, and Jasper: specifically, the Trans-Canada from Banff to Field and the Icefields Parkway (Hwy 93 north) from Lake Louise to Jasper.

Leckie begins with the big picture, reaching back in time to explain how the Rockies developed, before moving on to the eight colour-coded geological road trips, which are accompanied by full-colour maps, diagrams and photographs (and some art work). Along with the geology, Leckie apparently touches on the history, as well as the natural history, of each site.

It is well-written, easy-to-use, informative and jargon-free. Watch for it in local bookstores such as Chapters or Shelf-Life Books, or on Amazon.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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Backcountry Greenhorns

Backcountry greenhorns keep rescuers scrambling in Kananaskis

Reprinted from the Kananaskis Country Facebook Public Safety Section, Aug 25, 2017

Southwest ridge of Mount Cline looking towards Banff and the White Goat Wilderness area. K-Country Public Safety

 

Inexperienced backcountry hikers have K-Country rescuers hopping, with an astonishing 19 people needing to be retrieved from Bow Valley mountains in the last week alone.

Kananaskis Country Public Safety Section said that “luckily” none of the incidents involved any injuries but the calls have nonetheless tied up staff until the early hours of the morning on multiple nights.

“We can’t help but notice a pattern developing in our local Bow Valley mountains,” said an official post on the organization’s Facebook page on Friday.

“Yamnuska, EEOR, and Ha Ling have all managed to stump new hikers and cause a rash of 911 calls.”

Officials have some advice for anyone thinking about heading into the mountains:

• Take a headlamp or flashlight as days are getting shorter.

• Start your hikes early. “Late afternoon/early evening is too late to start an alpine scramble!”

• A fully charged phone battery is essential. “The light on the phone is fine if you are trying to find your keys underneath the car seat, but it is not enough to navigate through the hills. Aside from that, the phone is a critical link for communication.”

Safety officials are also asking experienced hikers to share their knowledge (and the Facebook post) with newbies, adding wryly that “the novelty of 2 am hikes wears off after 3 in a week.”

 

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August CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Recent Shuffle of Executive Members

CORE members, Stu C., Pat R., and Carol M. were all elected to new positions on the executive at our July monthly meeting. Stu will be holding down two positions: Webmaster and Membership; Pat has moved into the vacant Executive Trip Coordinator position (she is the person who will be collecting trip reports, going forward) and Carol will now “wear two hats”: Presentations and Communications.

Handing in Trip Reports

If you coordinate events and trips, you need to fill in a trip report and, either scan it and email it to mailbox@corehike.org or hand it to the Exec Trip Coordinator at a future meeting. The reports track member participation on hikes and are entered into Project Yodel, the club’s long-standing database which provides useful statistics at the end of each year.

Waterton National Park Hiking Weekend – September 1 – 4 

If you would like further details about the weekend being planned for CORE members on the Labour Day weekend, please check the CORE calendar and contact the coordinator, Anne-Marie, if you would like further information. Currently there are at least 13 members signed up, and some hikes have now been posted.

Here’s how to upload photos

Basically, you click on “Activities” on the home page, then “Photo Album.” You then have to login by selecting “My Albums” in the Fotki top toolbar, using “corehike” as the username and the same password you use to access the calendar. Open the CORE 2017 Photo Album. Click on “Create a New Album” found on the left hand side. A screen will appear where you can fill in the title, description and the day, month and year that the photos were taken (an important step, so don’t skip it). Scroll down and click on “Create Album.” From the folder where you have your photos stored on your computer, you can now “drag and drop” your photos to the Fotki Drag and Drop Window. If you want to add captions, click on “Edit” under each thumbnail. Or you can add captions as file names in your photos on your computer BEFORE you drag them over. This will automatically make captions when uploaded to Fotki. Be sure to save your changes.

If you’re still not sure how to do it, there are some instructions on the website, complete with screen shots to make the process clearer. Please go to CORE’s homepage (www.corehike.org) and click on Guides, then Photo Management and look for the link “How to Upload CORE Photos,” located in the second paragraph on the page.

 

Chicken

New Way to Collect Chicken Mountain Award Stories

Have you been on a CORE trip lately that went “a fowl” or where something unusual occurred along the trail? Well, now you don’t have to wait until the AGM to nominate a candidate for the Chicken Mountain Award. Just send your story to mailbox@corehike.org while it’s still fresh in your mind, and the executive will gather the stories together for the end of the year.

Canmore Wild Smart Program – Living “Smart” with Wildlife

Want to learn more about bear awareness and bear closures in the Bow Valley? Then visit the website of the Canmore Wild Smart Program by clicking on this link:  http://www.wildsmart.ca/

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July/August 2017

Between July 22 and August 12, CORE’s calendar featured 9 hikes, two urban walks, one biking event, a social dining evening and a slo-pitch practice. Waterfalls, fire lookouts, and amazing views were the main highlights of the hikes. We would like to thank the following coordinators for posting these events: Pat, Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Anne-Marie, Cliona, Cheryl, Dave V., Carol, and Mike.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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July 23 Bovine Road Block - Dyson Falls

July 23 – Bovine Road Block – Dyson Falls

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July 24 Cliona and the Chicken on Mount Hunter

July 24 – Cliona and the Chicken on Mount Hunter

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July 29 Twin Falls in Yoho

July 29 – Twin Falls in Yoho

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July 30 Legacy Trail Bikers

July 30 – Legacy Trail Bikers Taking a Break

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August 2 - Harvey, Geoff, Mike and Stu on West Wind Pass

August 2 – Harvey, Geoff, Mike and Stu on West Wind Pass

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August 3 - Ready to Play Ball - Pat and Carol

August 3 – Ready to Play Ball – Pat and Carol

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August 5 - Windtower Scramblers heading up hill

August 5 – Windtower Scramblers heading up

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August 6 - Lynn ponders best route on Burstall Pa

August 6 – Lynn ponders best route on Burstall Pass Trail

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Picnic on the ridge

August 12 – Hailstone Butte: Picnic on the Ridge

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AUGUST MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 29 August, 2017, 7:00 pm

Presentation: One Bicycle vs. the Russian Wilderness

Sean Nichols in Russoa

Another Cog in the Wheel

One of the world’s last great unbroken wilderness regions, the Russian taiga stretches nearly 10,000 km from the Pacific Ocean to the historic cities and palaces of Eastern Europe. Until recently the only way across this vast boreal forest was by train: the fabled Trans-Siberian Railway. But with the opening of a new road, it is now possible to traverse this landscape by car, or like Sean Nichols did in 2016, by bicycle. Join Sean as he recounts his adventures crossing the forests, plains, mountains and lakes of Russia from Siberia to Tatarstan and places in between. And along the way discover how to deal with the obstacles such a journey presents – from flat tyres to encounters with wildlife, mosquitos and perhaps the biggest obstacle of all: the formidable Russian Bureaucracy!

The meeting will also include club announcements, updates and a short slideshow from the Name That Flower contest. Winner will be announced.

Note: Our September meeting will feature Tony and Gillean Daffern, the well-known and popular writers of Kananaskis Country Trail Guide series. Tony has also penned Popular Day Hikes 2, as well as Backcountry Avalanche Safety. The presentation will include a review of the new Trailfinder application that the Dafferns have developed and a general/casual discussion of trails by Gillean.

“NATURE” NEWS & NOTES

Saskatoon Berries

Saskatoon berries are native to Alberta. The Plains Indians ate the fruit both fresh and dried in their dietary staple, pemmican. These berries are dark purple when ripe, tart and sweet with a slight almond flavour, and make excellent jams, preserves and pies. The mid-to-tall sized bush has small green leaves and sports white flowers in the spring. The berries grow in clusters along the stems; harvesting the high ones may require the help of a small step ladder.

Bison Return to Banff

Plains bison have returned to Banff National Park for the first time in more than a century. Coinciding with Canada’s 150th anniversary, bison returned to Banff’s Panther River Valley on February 1. For thousands of years, plains bison roamed the plains of North America. Their numbers were as high as 30 million, but bison nearly went extinct in the 19th Century, due to overhunting and slaughter. As migratory grazers, bison wandered into the mountains in the Bow Valley, but haven’t been present in more than 140 years, before the park’s creation in 1885. This year’s reintroduction program saw 10 pregnant females and six bulls brought from Elk Island National Park. Fittingly, on Earth Day (April 22), the first bison calf was born into the herd, with more young ones born in the following days and weeks.

Total Solar Eclipse

A total solar eclipse – the aligning of the Sun, Moon and Earth – will occur on August 21. The total phase will not be visible in Calgary, but can be observed as a partial solar eclipse here. It will be at its maximum at 11:33 a.m., so get out your pinhole camera and enjoy the spectacle; the last one was 1979.

A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

A Bird's Eye View

Viewing the world from the heights of Mt. Hunter

One of the hikes posted in July was the Mt. Hunter Lookout hike in Yoho National Park (July 24). Requiring a long drive from Calgary, this hike has been posted very few times during CORE’s 17-year history (in fact there is no listing for the hike in the club database). Six members and one guest (along with the Chicken) met at the trailhead (at the entrance to the Wapta Falls road). After safely crossing the Trans Canada Highway, the group headed up the trail, anticipating the chance to visit not one, but two fire lookouts.

Upper Lookout Keeper's Cabin

Lookout Keeper’s Cabin

Although the sites have not been manned for years, the lookout keepers’ cabins are still standing and serve as shelters during inclement weather. After 3.5 kilometres and 425 metres, we reached the first lookout site and stopped for lunch. Geoff and Harvey tried to climb the fire tower, but soon discovered it wasn’t safe. The upper lookout site was reached after lunch, 400 metres above the lower site. There we inspected the upper lookout keeper’s cabin, which was very quaint and rustic. The 800-900 metre elevation gain was worth it, as views were rewarding, and provided vistas of the surrounding mountains and the broad open valley to the south where the Kicking Horse and Beaverfoot Rivers meet. A good day was had by all!

 

ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Crunched for time?

Adding bursts of speed to walking workouts can give you positive benefit in less time

An Excerpt from the Calgary Herald – Written by Jill Barker

“It’s cheap, good for your health and easy to do, but just how fit do you get from your weekly walks around your neighbourhood?

Generally, improving your fitness level requires a workout intense enough to make your heart and lungs work harder. So if your walk is more of a stroll, chances are your cardiovascular system isn’t being challenged enough to become stronger and more efficient.

This doesn’t mean your walk is for naught. Walkers tend to go for distance rather than speed, which is exercise enough to improve health. Study after study has proven that walking reduces many of the risk factors related to cardiovascular disease like high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and stress, as well as reducing the risk of developing several types of cancer.

In a time-crunched world, though, it would be great if walkers could reap those benefits plus improve their fitness in less time…

…. Looking to create a walking program with all the values of walking, but with more bang for the buck, a Japanese research team devised an interval workout that takes half the time of traditional walking programs. It’s composed of five sets of three-minute bouts of low-intensity walking followed by three minutes of high-intensity walking (performed at an effort of at least seven on a scale of 10) for a minimum of four days per week. The total workout lasts about 30 minutes – half of which is performed at a high-intensity level.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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