June 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

The AGM

CORE held its annual AGM on May 29 with a membership attendance of about 45 people. The business part of the meeting saw the election of a full slate of Executive members to guide the club for the coming year. See the “Meet your new Executive” paragraph below for your new executive members.

The members in attendance passed a motion to waive membership fees for the following year for Executive members who serve the full year on the Executive.

The minutes for the CORE 2018 AGM are available on the CORE website at this link.

The “social” part of the evening included recognition of the club members who have organized summer and winter events throughout the year, presenting of the “Chicken Mountain Award” for the leader of the hike most gone awry – Harvey earned the title  this year -, and a well laid out table of food and refreshments, again, thanks to our energetic and well organized past executive.

Renewing Your Membership

CORE’s new online membership and electronic payment APP has been very successful, with around 100 members signing up by the time of the AGM. A few memberships were submitted as paper hand-written forms at the AGM, but we hope in the future to keep these to a minimum to help streamline the membership signup process and, of course, save paper.

 

Trip Photography

July 2017 East End of Rundle Summit

One very successful feature at the AGM was a photo slide show with pictures from almost every outing from May 2017 to May 2018. There were 125 great photos of places and people to remember from the previous year’s activities, and this was only possible to compile thanks to the great photographs posted on the website by participants in the events. To all you club photographers, please keep up the good work, and remember to post your photos. It helps some of us remember where we’ve been, and certainly makes our club website more interesting.

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You could be the next Event Leader!

—In case you wondered, last season from June 2017 to May 2018,  CORE volunteers put on around 140 hiking, city walks, snowshoeing, skiing and cycling events, plus another 37 socials such as dinners, tennis, skating, slo-pitch, movies, music, Trail Fest, and CMC presentations. These don’t just happen. Last year there were just 10 members who put in most of the effort to organize events. It takes a bit of time but we could use some more volunteers to organize outings and keep the calendar populated with interesting activities. If you have some ideas about trails to explore, or if you would like to get some ideas from people who have done lots of trails, and would like volunteer to organize some trips, please contact executive at mailbox@corehike.org, talk to an event leader when you are out on a hike, or come to one of the CORE monthly meetings.

June 26, CORE Monthly Meeting

Cambodia, land of Angkor Wat, Mekong River, and the Famous “Tuks Tuks”

Mark June 26 on your calendar as long time member, Jeanette, takes us on a colourful journey through much of Cambodia, where she was joined by Harvey and Carol, other long time CORE members.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

May/June 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for mid May to mid June. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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May 19 – Tennis anyone?

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May 20 – Kananaskis – Terrace Trail

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May 25 Long Prairie Ridge and Macabee Creek Loop

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May 26 – Barrier Lookout

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May 29 – When shall we four meet again, at the next CORE AGM

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June 2 – A mountaineering K9 on Wasootch Ridge

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June 2 – Break time on Wasootch Ridge

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June 9 – Grotto Canyon

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Meet Your New Executive

For the 2018-2019 club year we have a full slate of Executive members whose goal is to ensure that activities are run safely, keep the membership informed about what is happening within the club, as well as in the wider outdoor community, organize training programs and presentations, and maintain the website so we can continue to provide online information and the events calendar for the club. Here is your executive for the coming year:

Chair – Julia Trangeled

Julia is a longtime CORE member and has served may times on the Executive. She is an avid summer and winter activity participant, and is one of the organizers of weekend events, as well as weekday evening urban hikes.

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Co-Chair – Jeanette Nelder

Jeanette hails from Kiwi land and is also a long time member of the club and has served several time on the Executive. She is an efficient organizer.

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Treasurer – Craig Morris

Craig has taken on the task of treasurer for the second year now and has been key to getting our online membership payment  system up and running.

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Secretary – Laura Hood

Laura is new to the Executive this year and has volunteered to take on the role of Secretary. After participating in many enjoyable core outings, she felt it was time to get more involved to ensure the good times continue.

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Membership Coordinator – Marian Smith

Marian also has been a member of CORE for many years and has served on the Executive before. This year she has volunteered to take on one of the more challenging executive positions, that of Membership Coordinator. Thank you Marian.

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Executive Trip Coordinator – Mike Galbraith

Mike has been around the club for a long time and has filled various roles on the executive in the past. He is also a member of the Calgary Mountain Club, as well as serving on the executive of the UIAA – the international federation for climbing and mountaineering, so he knows a little bit about safety in the mountains. His role is to monitor and coach our volunteer event organizers to ensure basic practices are followed to keep participants safe on the trails.

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Communications Coordinator – David van den Eikof

Dave is an avid summer season hiker and event organizer for some of the more difficult terrain in the mountains. He too has spent more than his fair share of time on the executive in various roles. He is also a keen photographer and amateur artist.

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Presentations Coordinator – Kim Payne

Kim has been in the club for a few years, and spent her first year on the executive getting our club banner (as in physical banner) and an excellent first aid training course that year. This year she means to line up some interesting presenters for our month-end club meetings.

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Website Administrator – Stu Cox

Stu hails originally from the east coast, so came to mountain pursuits rather late. He is now a great believer in the slogan you see on the sign entering Yoho National Park – “The mountains shall set you free”-. Somehow he fell into the role of CORE Webmaster about 8 years ago, and has so far been unable to convince anyone else to take on the task.

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Member at Large – Kevin Jones

Kev moved from the UK, with Sarah, in 2012 to take advantage of the mountains without having to fly transatlantic to do so.  He has been a member of CORE for about four years, and enjoys hiking in the summer and tries to find time for cross country skiing, downhill skiing and snowshoeing in the winter.  Having joined the Executive for the first time at the 2018 AGM he is wondering what is really involved in being a ‘Member at Large’.  So if you have a suggestion or constructive criticism that you want to feed into the Executive, Kev is a point of contact for you.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Tick bite prevention during tick season

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard, city parks and paths.

Some of the best ways to avoid tick bites are: wear clothing that covers your arms and legs; tuck your pants into your socks or even put tape around openings in clothing so ticks have no access; and wear light-colored clothing to help you see if a tick is on you. When you are in the woods, keep to the centre of the trail, where ticks are less likely to be (ticks tend to stay in shrubs and bushes).

Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin.

  • As soon as you are home, check yourself or have a family member help check you for ticks. Use a fine-tooth comb through your hair and check folds of the skin. You should also shower and wash your clothes at a high heat so any ticks are killed.

The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses are:

Fever/chills 
With all tick-borne diseases, patients can experience fever at varying degrees and time of onset.

Aches and pains 
Tick-borne disease symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity and time of onset of these symptoms can depend on the disease and your personal tolerance level.

Rash 
Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia can result in distinctive rashes

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

Charming Spring © Patricia L. Cisco

Reminiscent melodies
serenade the morning breeze.

Feathered creatures nest with care
in cherry blossoms pink and fair.

Perfumed scent of roses flow.
Tiny blades of green grass grow.

Misty showers soak the earth,
glorious colors come to birth.

Gathering clouds come and go,
rain, sun, and vibrant bow.

Dainty petals, fancy flair,
dancing in the warm, sweet air.

Violets, yellows, purest white,
graceful, gentle, welcomed sight.

Thank you, oh sweet lovely Spring,
patiently waiting the charms you bring!

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/charming-spring

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For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

….see you on the trails …

SC

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May CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Renewing Your Membership – Join now online before the AGM

For all current members, if you haven’t renewed your membership yet, sign up now and pay online ahead of time to make it quicker and easier for you and the membership coordinator. Or at the AGM — If you do intend to sign up at the Annual General Meeting, please submit your membership form online and provide a copy of your confirmation email with your signature and payment to the membership committee at the AGM.

CORE’s Website now has Security Certificate

Recently CORE’s website provider, Nucleus, provided an SSL certificate (security certificate) for the club’s website. Rather than seeing http://corehike.org, you will now see https://corehike.org. Typically, SSL is used to secure credit card transactions, data transfer and logins, and more recently is becoming the norm when securing browsing of social media sites.

Special Motion at AGM

Members attending the AGM will be asked to vote on the following motion:

“Do you agree with waiving membership fees for those who volunteer for the executive each year?”

To qualify for a free membership, volunteers on the executive committee would have to serve a full term, and receive the free membership at the end of their term. Waiving membership fees would give the club the means to thank those on the executive committee and to acknowledge their hard work and commitment.

June 26, CORE Monthly Meeting – Cambodia, land of Angkor Wat, Mekong River, and the Famous “Tuks Tuks”

Mark June 26 on your calendar as long time member, Jeanette, takes us on a colourful journey through much of Cambodia, where she was joined by Harvey and Carol, other long time CORE members.

Participating in the BUY & SELL Event at the AGM – be sure to read!

backpack

For those wishing to participate in the buy-sell event at the AGM, it will commence after the business part of the meeting (in conjunction with the Social gathering). There will be some tables set up to display items for sale, swap or give-away. All sellers should have their items tagged beforehand with their name and the amount they would like to get. All negotiations are strictly between buyer and seller, and the club has no part in the sale other than providing the venue. Please try to come early with your items. The community hall doors will be open at 6:30.

Brand new Salomon boots and skis

This backpack, and brand new Salomon x-c skis and boots will be some of the items at the sale. The boots and bindings use a double bar system. The Salomon boots are women’s size U.S. 6.5 (UK 5), light grey, Sian7 Pilot.

 

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

April/May 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for April 21 – May 16. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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April 21 – Mysterious Maze – Three Sisters Pathway, Canmore

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April 22 – Johnston Canyon “Spring” Hike

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April 29 – A Sunny Spring Day on Fullerton Loop

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May 5 – Beautiful Scenery in Bow Valley Provincial Park

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May 12 – Upper Stoney Trail hike – through lovely mixed forest

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May 16 – Urban hike – Edgemont Hills, they “Rock”!

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MAY MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14 Avenue S.W.

Tuesday, May 29   7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AND SOCIAL

All members are invited and encouraged to attend the club’s AGM on Tuesday, May 29th. It’s always a fun, diverse and enjoyable evening, featuring food and refreshments, a chance to swap stories of adventures past and yet to come, plus the honour of helping to elect a new executive committee for 2018-2019. Happily, this year we already have nominations for a number of executive positions. There will be the annual anointing of the Chicken Mountain award winner, special recognition of trip coordinators, and door prizes. We will also have a “Buy-Sell” event of new/used equipment and clothing. It promises to be a full evening, with something for everyone!

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These CORE members are having fun at one of our AGMs! You can, too, on May 29th.

Pat and Mark

 

 

 

 

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Marvella and Cheryl

 

 

 

 

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Tick bite prevention during tick season

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard. Some of the best ways to avoid tick bites are: wear clothing that covers your arms and legs; tuck your pants into your socks or even put tape around openings in clothing so ticks have no access; and wear light-colored clothing to help you see if a tick is on you. When you are in the woods, keep to the centre of the trail, where ticks are less likely to be (ticks tend to stay in shrubs and bushes).

Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin.

  • As soon as you are home, check yourself or have a family member help check you for ticks. Use a fine-tooth comb through your hair and check folds of the skin. You should also shower and wash your clothes at a high heat so any ticks are killed.

The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses are:

Fever/chills 
With all tick-borne diseases, patients can experience fever at varying degrees and time of onset.

Aches and pains 
Tick-borne disease symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity and time of onset of these symptoms can depend on the disease and your personal tolerance level.

Rash 
Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia can result in distinctive rashes

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

Trip coordinators – Here’s a K-Country hike to try this spring and early summer if you’re looking for great views.

Prairie View Trail to McConnell Ridge or Barrier Lake Fire Lookout is a good hike to do when it’s super windy, as the trees provide shelter from the wind. When you finally break out of the trees at McConnell Ridge, you are rewarded with views of Barrier Lake, Mount Baldy and beyond. There’s a fun little scramble to a higher viewpoint (not recommended if icy), as well as the option to hike up to Barrier Lake Fire Lookout offering 360 views. Return the way you came for the quickest way down. 13.2 km return, 421 m elevation gain. Add on 0.7 km, 100 m elevation gain to the Fire Lookout.

Check this website for other spring/fall shoulder season hikes in Kananaskis Country:

http://www.playoutsideguide.com/2016/11/best-shoulder-season-hikes-kananaskis.html

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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April CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Nominee at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a few positions available for nominations (i.e., Presentations Coordinator, Communications Coordinator and Membership Coordinator). If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Other Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has recently learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline for Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the coming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

REMINDER: CORE’S BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

For further details please visit the Kananaskis Trails website at: http://kananaskistrails.com/ha-ling-upgrade/2018/

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

March/April 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 21 – April 14. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

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March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

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March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoe Gang

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April 1 – Chester to Sawmill snowshoe – Admiring the View Across Valley

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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April 14 – Chris, Ewa and Geoff on Sulphur Mountain Trail

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April 14 – Harvey, Ewa and David at Sulphur Mtn. Summit

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APRIL MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14 Avenue S.W.

Tuesday, April 24   7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Presentation: Tour of South Africa: Cities, Parks, Flora and Fauna

Please join us for our April Monthly Meeting. Following club announcements and updates, our presentation will feature a South African adventure. In 2016 Julia, a long time CORE member, took a trip to South Africa via Dubai.
Going from Dubai, a high end, over-the-top city, to relaxing Cape Town, was a study in contrasts, but both were fascinating in their own way. Table Mountain was a sight to see (on a non-cloudy day). A trip via the beautiful Garden Route led along the coast to Plettenburg Bay and then to the safari park to see “the big 5”, the most amazing enclosed bird sanctuary and a town built on canals. Incredible mountain scenery led through ‘ostrich country’ with enormous caverns, to Stellenbosch in the wine region outside Cape Town where the wines and the scenery vie for first place.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Grizzly Population Stable in K-Country

According to the latest DNA census in Alberta’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

An excerpt from Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

Bears Coming Out of their Dens

Parks Canada confirmed the first sighting of a grizzly bear on March 24 along the Bow Valley Parkway. It’s believed to be male grizzly 122 – also known as The Boss – the largest, toughest and most dominant grizzly bear in Banff, Yoho and Kootenay national parks.

Keep Your Dog on a Leash

BANFF – Keep your dogs on a leash protest song is barking at off-leash pooch walkers in Banff National Park.

It’s illegal to feed, disturb or entice any wildlife in national parks and because an off-leash dog can aggressively confront wildlife such as grizzly bears and elk, there are strict regulations in place. For some further background information about the rules and some Banff local musicians’ efforts to spread the word, please visit this Rocky Mountain Outlook page.

http://www.rmoutlook.com/article/Protest-song-urges-dog-owners-to-keep-pets-leashed-20180412

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment and Parks  https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…These names may bring back happy memories growing up on a farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites, or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes: bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we might drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

10 Suggested Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

CORE Event Coordinators – Try to add some of these hikes to the club calendar this spring

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle

    View from Tunnel Mountain

  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake
  • Johnston Canyon
  • Lake Louise Lakeshore

For more information on these hikes, visit:

https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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March CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Volunteer at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a couple of positions available for nominations. If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Calgary Ski Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline – Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

 

REMINDER: CORE’s BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

February/March 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for ?????  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek Trail

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

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March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

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March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoers

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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????? Chester to Sawmill – Admiring the View across the Valley

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FEBRUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Members and Guests – Please join us at Scarboro Community Centre, 1737 – 14th Avenue S.W. Tuesday, March 27, 7:00 p.m.

Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks

Following club announcements and updates, our guest presenter will be Dale Leckie, author of a recently published book called Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks.

An award-winning geologist and best-selling author, Dale will guide you through the Canadian Rocky Mountain National Parks. The story of the Rockies, its rivers and valleys, glaciers and hot springs, caves and karst, mountain building and erosion unfolds.

With eye-catching illustrations and photographs, this presentation blends story telling with science and natural beauty with easy to understand explanations. Be prepared to be amazed by the story written in the Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers. Dale’s book will be available for sale. You can pay with cash or credit card. The cost is $28.00 cash and Dale pays the GST. If a credit card is used, the cost is $27.95 plus GST.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

 

According to the latest DNA census in the province’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

 

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment & Parks (https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/)

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…The names may bring back happy memories growing up on the farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes; bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

10 Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle
  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake

 

For more information on these hikes, visit: https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

 

 

 

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW


 

 

 

 

….see you on the trails …

CM

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February 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Missed the January meeting at the Norseman Outdoor Specialists store?

Here are some highlights:

Roughly 25 members filled the Norseman store on a cold January night (Jan. 30) to learn about snowshoeing and the “true definition of winter” from Justin Howse, the store’s operations manager. We learned:

  • Winter conditions can exist even on a cold summer day (due to elements such as wind and rain). Always dress appropriately and be prepared for “winter-like” conditions.
  • Be aware of your surroundings when you are snowshoeing or x-c skiing (and make good decisions, such as not having lunch in an avalanche runoff zone or beneath a snow-covered slope).
  • In winter, have a wick-away layer next to your skin, followed by a warm layer (such as fleece), and a soft shell jacket on the top. For more warmth, add another layer to the “middle” layer, rather than put on a hard shell jacket that may be rain-proof but doesn’t breathe.
  • When going up and down hills on snowshoes, Justin suggests trying a “herringbone” technique when ascending, and a “snowplough” stance, similar to downhill skiing, when descending (being careful not to cross the tip of one snowshoe over the other).

Embracing an Unusual Winter with “CORE Enthusiasm”

Swishing along ski trails, gliding through snow laden forests, exploring pristine landscapes on snowshoes…CORE’s winter season has featured many well-attended trips, fabulous snow conditions (and, admittedly, a few frosty days)…. all mixed with lots of fun and adventure in the outdoors. Thanks to Cheryl, Lynn, Harvey, Carol, Mary, Pat, Julia Tsang, Katherine, Stu, John R., Anne-Marie, Julia Trangeled, David T., Edna, Cathie, Sarah, David M., and Pam for posting events and courses this winter. (Sorry if we missed anyone!)

 

Carpooling Contributions – A Suggestion from the Executive

CORE’s current carpool formula ($0.20 x total distance of trip divided by the number of people in the vehicle – including driver) was devised a number of years ago when gas prices were somewhat lower. With gas prices fluctuating like a yoyo and being fairly unpredictable in recent months, the executive would like to suggest the following:

If gas prices are higher than $1.15 at the time of a CORE trip, drivers can consider requesting a donation based on $0.25, rather than $0.20. (E.g., $0.25 x total distance of trip divided by the number of people in the vehicle). We will leave it up to the discretion of the drivers.

Interested in Volunteering for CORE?

There are many ways that members can contribute to CORE:

  • volunteer for the 2018-2019 executive (as a registered society we must fill four important positions: Chairperson, Secretary, Treasurer and Membership, or risk having to dissolve the club);
  • coordinate events (either in the city or in the mountains);
  • volunteer to give a presentation at a monthly meeting or suggest ideas for future presentations (send an email to mailbox@corehike.org);
  • nominate someone for the Chicken Mountain Award (send an email to mailbox@corehike.org);
  • make suggestions or comments via mailbox@corehike.org

CORE sponsored “Buy and Sell” Event

Watch for further details in next month’s newsletter about a “Buy and Sell” event that CORE’s executive committee is planning for the April 2018 meeting.

March’s Monthly Meeting

On March 27th, Dale Leckie, author of Rocks, Ridges and Rivers: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks, will give a slideshow on the geology of the Canadian Rockies, without referencing a lot of difficult-to-understand geological terms.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

January/February 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for January 18 – February 11. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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January 20 – Evan Thomas Creek snowshoe

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January 21 – Pristine scenery along Braille Trail

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January 27 – Lusk Creek snowshoers brave the cold

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January 27 – A wintery wonderland at Lake Louise

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January 28 – Boulton Bridge-Elk Pass-Fox Creek ski

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February 10 – Pat, Laz, and Susan – snowshoeing at Confederation Park

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February 10 – Happy skiers at Peter Lougheed Provincial Park

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February 11 – Is Geoff really up to his waist in snow?

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February 11 – Chris after a close encounter with the snow

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FEBRUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Members and Guests – Please join us at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Avenue S.W. Tuesday, February 27, 7:00 p.m.

A Tour of Ancients Civilizations by One of our Own “Ancients”

In 2017, Mike (a long-time CORE member) travelled to Egypt (March), Greece (July) and Cyprus (November). He will show some pyramids, sailing up the Nile, then move on to the Greek tour of Athens, Algina, Eleusis, Meteora, Delph, Corinth, Mycenae, Epidaurus, Hydra, Patmos, Ephesus (in Turkey), Samos and back to Athens. Finally, a brief visit to Cyprus – Kouklia and Paphos.

In the Greek part, Mike will talk about several of the ancient monuments (not including himself), Greek art, dancing, walking, food, drink, sunsets and cats (there are a lot of cats in Greece).

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

NON-CORE EVENT

Nikki Heim – March 15, 2018: Wolverine Populations in South-Central Alberta 

Join the Friends of Kananaskis as Nikki reveals when the fierce wolverine meets its match, providing a glimpse into factors influencing a declining population in Kananaskis Country.

University of Calgary – Science Theatres ST 135, 527 Campus Place NW

Time: 7:00pm – 8:00pm

General Admissions – $5 Suggested Donation – No Pre-Show Ticket Sales

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 A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

NON-CORE EVENT

Fundraiser Event – Great Divide Trail Association

– Mar 15

A journey of adventure, discovery & survival

An evening of stories with Brian Keating, as he takes the audience on a high energy adventure through some of the major mountain ranges of the world. Brian Keating is a regular on CBC Homestretch and was awarded the 2017 Stan Hodgkiss Canadian Outdoorsperson of the Year Award by the Canadian Wildlife Federation. Brian is a wildlife advocate, a pilot, scuba diver and mountaineer and has hiked, explored and advocated for wildlife across the globe, including Canada’s own Great Divide Trail.

All profits from the event will be invested in the completion and environmental protection of the Great Divide Trail.

Tickets:
Regular:  $30.00, Students:  $15.00

The Details:
When:  Thursday, March 15, 7:00 – 9:00pm, doors open at 6:30pm
Where:  John Dutton Theatre, 616 Macleod Trail Southeast, Calgary
How to Get a Ticket:  Click here:  Tickets available on eventbrite

Please share this info with others and help us spread the word about our event with Brian Keating!

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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JANUARY CORE NEWSLETTER

EXECUTIVE CORNER

January CORE Meeting Moved to Norseman Outdoor Specialists Shop

Due to renovations at Scarboro Community Hall, we were forced to find an alternative location. The Norseman Outdoor Specialists shop (formerly the Norseman Ski & Hike shop) came to our rescue and offered their store for the meeting. See further details below.

Cross Country Ski Lessons Deemed a Success

The executive would like to thank those members who participated in the subsidized x-c ski lessons on Jan. 7 and Jan. 14. Those who took the lessons all agreed that U of C Outdoor Centre instructor, Steven, was excellent and that they had learned some valuable skills for improving their skiing.

CORE Makes Donation to West Bragg Creek Greater Trails Association

Many CORE members enjoy x-c skiing and snowshoeing at West Bragg Creek during the winter, as well as hiking and biking there in the summer. The West Bragg Creek Greater Trails Association, which maintains and track sets the ski trails in this recreation area, recently expanded the parking lots and installed new washrooms and a warming hut. The association depends primarily on donations to maintain the ski trails in top condition. For these reasons, the executive has decided to donate $100 to the WBCGTA.

CORE Featured in 10hikes.com Calgary Hiking Clubs Blog

In late 2017, CORE was contacted by a fellow named Adam Hayman who writes for a website called 10hikes.com. He asked if he could interview one of our members to obtain information about the club so he could feature CORE in a section called Calgary Hiking Clubs.

CORE was selected as one of three local clubs featured in the blog. The other two were Slow and Steady and Fifth Dimension (a seniors club). To read what Adam wrote about CORE (and the other clubs), click on this link https://10hikes.com/calgary-hiking-clubs/

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November 2017 – January 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for November 26 to January 14. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

December 2 – Jeanette and Mary on Paint Pots Trail


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December 9 – Hard to believe this is a winter hike – Nose Hill

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November 26 – Taking a Break on Tunnel Mountain

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November 26 – Hanging out at the Banff Centre after Tunnel Mountain

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December 17 – Marushka Lake group

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December 17 – Harvey and Laura – Marushka Lake hike

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December 16 – Pat, the Famous Ice Climber

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December 16 – Guess Who?

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December 24 – A Beautiful Day near Lower Kananaskis Lake

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January 7 – Mila, Pat and Laura – CORE Ski Lesson

 

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January 3 – Logger’s Loop Group Photo

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January 13 – Cathy and David ready to Skate

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January 13 – Group looking energetic before challenging ski to Lookout

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January 14 – Julia, Carol, Dave, Anne-Marie, Noreen and Bob – Ski Lesson

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JANUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Norseman Outdoor Specialists Store

4655 – 37 Street S.W. (Park in shopping mall across street but need to register your vehicle’s licence  number in the machine; or park on the street)

TUESDAY, January 30, 2018, 7:00 pm

Members and Guests: Please join us for our January meeting at the Norseman Outdoor Specialists shop.

Our presentation will be:

Winter Safety and Snowshoeing Skills

Snowshoeing is a wonderful winter activity that can, at times, be underestimated when it comes to safety. Justin Howse – a certified hiking guide – will be discussing the common issues and fitting troubles with snowshoes, along with skills and techniques to make snowshoeing more enjoyable. He will also be covering winter safety related to snowshoeing in the Rockies. Understanding what avalanche terrain looks like, what “Winter” actually is, along with equipment to consider for snowshoe travel will be discussed.

Justin is an instructor with the Outdoor Council of Canada, and a professional with the Interpretive Guides Association. He is also experienced as a wilderness first responder and has wilderness survival training. He is currently the operations manager at Norseman Outdoor Specialists.  

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Annual Christmas Bird Counts Originally Started for a “Sinister” Reason

Did you know that Christmas bird counts are done throughout North America and in some tropical areas in Central America, northern South America, the Caribbean and the Pacific Islands? The activity began well over a century ago in the U.S. as a protest of an existing Christmas tradition in which teams competed to see who could shoot the most birds and other animals in one day.

Friends of Kananaskis Speaker Series

University of Calgary – Science Theatres ST 135

527 Campus Place NW

Time: 7:00pm – 8:00pm

General Admissions – $5 Suggested Donation – No Pre-Show Ticket Sales

Megan Evans – January 25, 2018: The Buzz About Native Bees

Did you know there are over 300 species of native bees in Alberta? Come learn all about the different bees, how and where they live and what you can do to help promote native bees in your own backyard

Christian Stenner – February 15, 2018: The Caves of Kananaskis and Beyond

Christian will discuss the captivating pursuit of cave exploration and some of his international expeditions and contribution to scientific research along the way.

Nikki Heim – March 15, 2018: Wolverine Populations in South-Central Alberta 

Join the Friends of Kananaskis as Nikki reveals when the fierce wolverine meet its match, providing a glimpse into factors influencing a declining population in Kananaskis Country.

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 A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Free National Park Passes in 2017 Hailed as a Success by Parks Canada

An excerpt from the Banff Crag & Canyon Newspaper

The popular year-long program allowing visitors to enter Banff National Park for free has earned more than a passing grade from Parks Canada.

“Initial worries that the free entry promotion would result in massive overcrowding – with resulting damage to both the natural habitat and wildlife – proved groundless thanks to a carefully planned focus on urging visitors to use public transit much more than in previous years,” according to Banff National Parks visitor experience manager, Greg Danchuk.

“We feel 2017 was a great success here in Banff National Park.”

According to Danchuk, there was a weekend transit service from Calgary that carried 11,000 people to the park during just 27 days of service – that’s a lot of cars not on the road. Once people arrived, regular shuttle services provided a way to get around Banff town site or to travel to Lake Louise.

Parks Canada is now looking at future options, but say that they have learned a lot this year and that the experience in 2017 should help make things better in the future when it comes to moving people from Calgary to Banff.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Cave and Basin book offers context, clarity on history of Banff hot springs

Banff historian, E.J. (Ted) Hart has written a new book called Cave and Basin: Banff’s hot springs and the birth of Canada’s national parks. While relatively brief at 96 pages, Hart’s book is welcome as it is the authoritative record of the hot springs. Hart has pulled together a remarkable amount of detail on a subject that has been shoved on the sidelines for many years.

He begins his story with the Indigenous people of the Rocky Mountains and southern Alberta, placing their story into the context of the hot springs. Surprisingly, the first non-Indigenous person to make note of the springs was explorer James Hector, according to Hart. After Hector, the next people to come across the springs were prospectors Joe Healy (Healy Pass) in 1873 and Willard Burrell Younge in 1875.

By the time, railway workers, Frank McCabe and brothers, Tom and William McCardell discovered the hot springs in the fall of 1883, the hot springs had already been “discovered” at least three times, if not more, says author Hart.

The book is published by Banff-based Summerthought.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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Pat’s Awesome Ice Climbing Adventure

After seeing a Calgary Mountain Club ice climbing presentation with Will Gadd (awesome mountaineer/ice climber/nice man), Harvey and I thought it would be a great idea to take an ice climbing course.  I had no climbing experience at all, but what the hey? Soooo I posted a class from the U of C on the CORE calendar and had 2 other people sign up.  Yes!”

Pat kitted up for Ice Climbing

On the day of the practical climb it was super early in the morning as we met near Canmore at 7:15. It was pitch black out, really windy and cold and we all wondered what we were thinking when we agreed to do this.

After CORE members Uszula, Kevin, Harv and Pat met the rest of our group, 11 in total, we drove on to King’s Creek in Kananaskis Park where we proceeded to get ready for our adventure.  It was still early, still pitch black outside and a fairly nippy -10 C.

We then proceeded to hike over fallen trees and icy streams to our destination.  Once there we had a chat about where to go to the bathroom (men on one side of the falls, women on the other).  We put on our harness, crampons and helmets – some of us were better as this than others – yes, I admit I had trouble with getting the equipment on, like, a lot. We did a few practice runs on footing and how to use an ice pick. Then it was time to get climbing.

Harv chipping his way up the icecycle

We had two instructors from the U of C – Patrick and Larry.  Both were really helpful, and very knowledgeable. We practiced throughout the day, the only real issue being that it was fairly chilly but most of us had dressed appropriately so that wasn’t too much of a problem.  I took a spill on the falls but that’s why you have ropes, so it was no big deal. It was a bit like going down a long slide and actually quite fun.  One person got hit in the face with a bit of ice but otherwise there were no injuries, not even an ice pick dropped on someone’s head, which was a distinct possibility.

Around 4:30 it was time to pack up and I have to confess I was ready to depart, since I was a bit chilled and definitely getting tired and we still had to hike back to the cars.  The way back seemed to be much harder for some reason, but luckily I had a few helping hands to get me over the icy parts.  I also got a chance to talk with Patrick who shared with me his love of the mountains and stories about some of his adventures. Then it was time to say goodbye which is always a bit sad – got hugs from Larry and Patrick – and got gratefully into the warm car.

If anyone is interested in taking this course I can highly recommend it, even if you have no previous experience it was well worth it.

By Pat Ranger

CORE Member Extraordinaire

 

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November CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Mountain Equipment Co-0p Discount Night for CORE members 

Thursday, November 23, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Start your Christmas Shopping Early!

Please bring your CORE membership card to MEC (830 – 10 Avenue S.W.) to receive a wristband and be eligible for a 10% discount on all your purchases that evening.  At 7:30, there will be a short winter layering and clothing demonstration.  Coordinators for the evening are David and Edna. If you have any questions, please consult the CORE calendar for their contact information.

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Peterman Fund X-Country Ski Lessons 

The executive is arranging for X-C ski lessons for CORE members in January. This training will be partially paid for by the Branko Peterman Endowment Fund. Please watch the CORE calendar for details.

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Getting Ready for Winter Adventures

The club is currently gearing up for a winter season of snowshoeing, x-country skiing and hopefully downhill skiing. In the next few days more trips will be added to the calendar, but members are invited and encouraged to post additional events, outings and activities for CORE. Please contact Pat, our Executive Trip Coordinator, if you have any questions about coordinating or if you would like to co-coordinate with an experienced coordinator. Her email address is listed on the Executive Contact page; click on the Resources tab on the website (second item from the bottom on the drop down menu).

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UPDATE: December 1- 3 Annual Christmas Weekend at Castle Mountain Chalets

With the holiday season approaching, so is our annual Christmas weekend at Castle Mountain chalets, December 1st to 3rd. There are already 16 of us signed up. There is both a snowshoe and a cross-country ski outing scheduled for each day. We will do appetizers on Friday evening around 7:00 p.m. in the adjacent chalets and our traditional potluck is scheduled for Saturday evening. People coming for the day from Calgary are welcome to join in. The four rooms in the adjacent chalets are taken, so new reservations should be made directly with Castle Mountain chalets. Do not forget to mention the 20% discount for CORE members. Looking forward to a great weekend.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October/November 2017

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for October 22 to November 12. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

October 22 – Canoe Meadows to Widow Maker hike

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October 28 – Terrace Trail South

 

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October 31 – Hallowe’en Pumpkin Creations

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November 5 – Winter hiking at Glenbow Ranch

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November 11 – Johnston Canyon Upper Falls

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November 11 – Chicken Checking Trail Sign

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November 12 – Hiking the Friendship Trail

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NOVEMBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY, November 28, 2017, 7:00 pm

Annual Christmas Meeting and Party

All members are invited to our Annual Christmas Meeting and Party, our final meeting for 2017. The evening will begin with a special program — a slideshow of winter activities from the past few years followed by “CORE’s Got Talent,” featuring a performance by the talented CORE executive.

You’ll be invited to reveal your talents during a Christmas quiz (and perhaps win a prize). The night will end with a Christmas fete (a delectable buffet, ample Christmas cheer and festive music) to put everyone in the Christmas mood. This year, we’ll be serving drinks and munchies during our official program, after which the full buffet and social festivities will begin.

We are hoping for as many members as possible to come together for our last social of the year to celebrate the Christmas season and mingle with your fellow hikers, so be sure to come along and join in the fun.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Raccoon-spotting in Banff – a Rare Thing, Indeed!

Raccoon eating corn

Did you know that raccoons are not normally seen in Banff National Park? This fall a raccoon was spotted in the Banff townsite which prompted Parks Canada to begin tracking the animal on remote cameras. The problem, according to Parks Canada, is that the raccoon is not a native species in Banff and could cause damage to the ecosystem. Raccoons are normally found in southwestern Alberta. According to Alberta Fish and Wildlife, in the wild raccoons feed on fruits, nuts, berries and insects, and foods that can be found near water such as fish, birds, eggs and frogs. They are omnivores that can easily adapt to whatever food sources are available

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Another Year Older

This month CORE turns 18, a mere teenager in comparison to other clubs that have been around for a number of decades, such as the Calgary Ski Club, the Rocky Mountain Ramblers and the Calgary Weekend Hikers.

Since 1999, CORE has had it share of growing pains, as it evolved from its infancy into an adolescent. Some of the attributes that have kept CORE going are: dedicated coordinators, friendships that have developed, the adventures that have nourished our spirits, and the sense of community and commonality that comes from spending time in nature. Let’s hope that we can grow strong and tall as we approach adulthood in two years. And still be going strong when we turn 30.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Will 2017-2018 be a “La Nina” year?

La Niña means The Little Girl in Spanish. La Niña is also sometimes called El Viejoanti-El Niño, or simply “a cold event.

The impacts of La Niña on the global climate tend to be opposite those of El Niño. During a La Niña year, winter temperatures are warmer than normal in the southeast and cooler than normal in the northwest. La Niña usually brings colder winters to the Canadian west and Alaska, and drier, warmer weather to the American southeast.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists are “predicting” that a La Niña will form this winter, but this is not a certainty. Right now, they’re saying there’s a 55-65 percent chance. For it to officially be a La Niña year, the sea surface temperature needs to hold at least 0.5 degrees below average for three months.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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October CORE newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

On-line Membership Sign-up and Electronic Payment Now Up & Running

Next time you want to renew your CORE membership, you will be able to do so on-line, using your credit card or PayPal. Thanks to invaluable help from CORE member Steve Hashman, we now have on-line membership sign-up and payment capability. Check out the new on-line form and waiver on the Join Now page.

Upcoming CORE Presentations for 2018

Join us at the Scarboro Community Centre for the following presentations in the New Year:

January 30 – Snowshoeing 101 – Justin Howse from Norseman Ski Shop will give a comprehensive talk on snowshoe equipment, snowshoeing techniques and safety while snowshoeing.

March 27 – Author Dale Leckie will give a slideshow on his new book, Rocks, Rivers and Ridges – Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Park.

April 24 – CORE member, Mike G., will share his recent trips to Egypt, Greece and Turkey.

June 26 – (tentatively) – CORE member, Jeanette N., will share her recent travels in Cambodia.

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December 1- 3 Annual Christmas Weekend at Castle Mountain Chalets

For the past four or five years, CORE members have been gathering in the mountains on the first weekend in December for an early Christmas get together. Over the weekend, we snowshoe, cross country ski and downhill ski. More adventurous members have been known to back country ski. Check the CORE calendar for more details about the weekend. Over the coming weeks, the activities will be posted with further information.

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Discount for CORE members at Norseman Ski and Hike Shop

CORE members are currently entitled to show their membership cards at the Norseman Ski and Hike Shop on 37 Street S.W. and get a 10% discount on hiking and skiing apparel and equipment. There may be some restrictions to this offer, such as no discount on sale items, etc. This offer is definitely good for the rest of 2017, and may be extended into 2018.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September/October 2017

Between September 11 and October 22, CORE’s calendar featured eight hikes, one bike & hike, three urban hikes, one potluck picnic hike, and a social dining evening.  Thanks to the following coordinators for posting these events: Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Carol, Cathie, John, Cliona, Cheryl, Kiyoko and Sarah.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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September 16 – Annual Memorial Hike

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September 23 –  A snowy day at Upper Meadow (Burstall Pass)

 

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September 23 – CORE gang on Powderface and Prairie Creek Loop

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September 24 – Brilliant blues and autumn foliage of Glenmore Reservoir

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September 24 – Kiyoko and her group on Wasootch Ridge

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September 26 – Pat with Gillean and Tony Daffern after CORE meeting

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September 28 – Happy hikers on 12 Mile Coulee urban walk

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September 30 – Spectacular view of Hailstone Butte from Windy Peak

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October 9 – Getting ready to hike Jack Hill and Jill Hill

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October 22 – Roasting sausages over the fire

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OCTOBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 31 October, 2017, 7:00 pm

Halloween Potluck, Party and Pumpkins!

Halloween Party

Join us at 7:00 p.m. at the Scarboro Community Centre for a Halloween Celebration featuring an Appetizer Potluck, Pumpkin Carving and Decorating, and Music for your listening and dancing pleasure! Beverages will be provided by CORE. Please bring a contribution to the potluck (e.g., appetizers, finger food, munchies, sandwiches, desserts, Halloween treats). Also, bring your own pumpkin, then put on your creative cap and take part in the pumpkin decorating and/or carving event.  CORE will supply lots of decorating materials but you are welcome to bring your own. CORE will also provide four pumpkins for those who are not able to bring their own.  If you prefer to carve your pumpkin, don’t forget your carving tools! We encourage everyone to wear at least one Halloween accessory, or a full costume, or wear black and orange.

 

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NATURE NEWS & “NOTES”

SNOWSHOES:

Come to our January 30 meeting to hear Justin Howse of the Norseman Ski Shop talk about snowshoes, and how to buy the right type. In the meantime, here are some tips for choosing snowshoes for your winter outings.

Cheryl and Katherine

Snowshoe Sizing

Snowshoe size is a key factor in getting the right amount of flotation. Generally, the heavier the person or the lighter and drier the snow, the more snowshoe surface area is required. Snowshoe size also depends on the type of activity you intend to do. For deep powder, a longer, wider snowshoe would be the most effective, but heavier and more tiring to use. Keep in mind that on CORE snowshoeing trips you are often on a trail where someone else has already “broken trail,” in which case you can use a smaller, narrower snowshoe – much easier and less tiring.

Men’s vs Women’s Gear 

Men’s snowshoes are designed to accommodate larger boots and heavier loads. For example, aluminum-frame snowshoes come in multiple sizes, usually 8″ x 25″, 9″ x 30″ and 10″ x 36″ or something similar. Women’s snowshoes tend to feature narrower, more contoured frame designs and sizes down to 8″ x 21″. Their bindings are sized to fit women’s footwear.

Easy-to-Fasten Bindings 

Make sure the bindings fit the boots you are going to be wearing, and that the fasteners are heavy duty (so they won’t break) and easy to secure and adjust.

Snowshoe Traction Devices 

Snowshoes for rolling or mountain terrain will come with toe crampons that rotate under the front of your foot to aid in climbing hills. Heel crampons are in a V shape and slow you down when descending hills. Look for both for casual snowshoeing in the Rockies. Some more rugged snowshoes may also have side rails (also called traction bars) to prevent slipping when crossing steep slopes.

Heel lifts

Also known as climbing bars, these are wire bails that can be flipped up under your heels to relieve calf strain on steep uphill sections and save energy on long ascents.

Watch this YouTube video for some further useful snowshoeing tips.

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OUTDOOR TRACTION DEVICES:

Highly Recommended by CORE for Winter Hikes and Outings

Kahtoola MICROspikes:

Cheryl with MICROspikes

Although the Kahtoola MICROspikes ($85 at MEC – October 2017) are perhaps a bit too aggressive for regular around-town sidewalk use, they are a good choice for all-purpose go-to option for longer hikes in mixed snow and icy conditions. Despite heavy use and abuse on everything from frozen streets to icy backcountry trails, they perform flawlessly and are incredibly durable. As a further testament, Backpacker magazine awarded the MICROspikes one of their 2012 Editors’ Choice Gold Awards, which honors exceptional outdoor gear that has withstood the test of time.

 ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip:

A more recent entry into the field, the ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip ($49 at MEC, $55 at Atmosphere – October 2017) are a slightly different, slightly less aggressive take on the MICROspikes. They slip on using a similar stretchy rubber harness system, but instead of short, sharp vertical teeth underfoot, they use a lower-profile multi-toothed chain for grip. This will be the third season they’ve been available and they have been garnering some excellent reviews.

ICEtrekkers Diamond Grip

YakTrax Extreme (XTR) Ice Cleats:

Yaktrax XTR Ice Cleats ($29.99 at Sport Check and Atmosphere – October 2017) provide good traction on snow and ice. Their spike design enhances traction while preventing snow build up with its unique anti-snow pack plate. They appear to be a lighter, less heavy-duty version of MICROspikes, with 10 spikes on the bottom, as opposed to 12 on the MICROspikes.  They have good and bad reviews on Amazon; one reviewer says that they are not sized correctly.

TIP: When buying any outdoor traction device, make sure that you buy them large enough to fit the boots that you will be wearing most often when using the spikes or cleats (which could be a size larger than your walking shoes).

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ARTICLES & BOOKS and WEBSITES WORTH NOTING

The most underrated endurance workout? Hiking.

“There’s something special about moderately paced movement through nature that leaves one feeling refreshed, renewed, and satisfied. Because of that, hiking is rarely considered a sport in the same way as trail running or mountain biking, both of which are more acutely painful and taxing on the body. And yet recent studies show that a walk in the woods—especially at the right tempo—is a superb way to build endurance and strength.”

For a study published earlier this year in the journal PLOS One, a team of researchers affiliated with the University of Innsbruck in Austria had individuals complete two three-hour workouts under distinct conditions. The first was a “fast walk” on an indoor treadmill; the second was an outdoor hike through mountains. In the treadmill condition, the incline settings were contrived to mimic the outdoor route as closely as possible, so that the physical strain of both scenarios would be similar. (The researchers could not force the treadmills to decline, so outdoor downhill segments became indoor flat segments.)

During and immediately following both workouts, the researchers collected physiological and psychological measures. What they found is interesting, a bit paradoxical, and fully in support of hiking.

For starters, participants pushed themselves harder during the outdoor hike, as evidenced by heart rates that were, on average, six beats per minute higher. Given this, you’d think the participants would have experienced the outdoor hike as more tiring and perhaps less enjoyable. But the opposite occurred: They reported increased feelings of pleasure both during and immediately following the outdoor hike, and they said they felt less fatigued afterward. Put differently, going hard while hiking in nature feels easier than going hard indoors.

(Sourced from the Alpine Club of Canada, Calgary Section Newsletter)

Tony and Gillean Daffern’s New Trailfinder Application

At our September meeting, Tony and Gillean Daffern, author and publisher of Kananaskis Trail Guides, introduced their new website which features their Trailfinder application. It’s worth checking out if you are looking for maps and information on trails.

http://kananaskistrails.com/trailfinder/trailfinder.html

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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September CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Seeking Ideas for Courses

The CORE executive is currently looking for ideas from the members about educational courses they would like to see in the future. If you have a suggestion for a course or courses that could be funded by the legacy Branko Peterman fund, please send your idea(s) to mailbox@corehike. org.

Stories are Coming in for Chicken Mountain Award (the CMA)

We now have two stories that have been submitted via mailbox@corehike.org for the Chicken Mountain Award. These, and other stories submitted to the mailbox over the year, will be revealed at the club’s AGM in May, where a winner of the award will be selected.

Progress is being made on On-line Membership Sign-up and Payment Capabilities

As announced at our August meeting, the executive is working to set up an on-line membership form and payment system to make membership renewal easier and more convenient. Stay tuned for further details!

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August/September 2017

Between August 19 and September 10, CORE’s calendar featured four different cycling events (mountain biking, road biking to the Gopher Hole Museum, urban biking around the entire city and city pathway biking through various parks). Also on the calendar were seven hikes in the mountains, two urban hikes, and a social dining evening.  Thanks to the following coordinators for posting these events: Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Anne-Marie, Dave V., Carol, and Cathie.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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August 19 – Pigeon Mountain Summit

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August 20 – Carol and Kiyoko – Outnumbered

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August 26 – Distant View from Sulphur Springs

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Sept. 2 – Heading off to hike the Wall Lake trail

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Sept. 2- Anne-Marie on Carthew Alderson trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept. 3 – Goat Haunt Group (Shoreline Hike)

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Sept. 3 – Bald Eagle seen from Waterton Tour Boat

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Sept. 6 – Mei, Geoff and Harvey embark on a long bike ride

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Sept. 10 – Signal Hill – Tuscany Biking group

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SEPTEMBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 26 September, 2017, 7:00 pm

Presentation: Authors and hikers Gillean and Tony Daffern – Kananaskis Country Trail Guide Series

Join us at 7:00 p.m. at the Scarboro Community Centre for a presentation by experienced hikers and authors Gillean and Tony Daffern. Gillean and Tony are the popular and well-known writers and publishers of the series, Kananaskis Country Trail Guides. Tony has also penned, Popular Dayhikes 2: Canadian Rockies as well as Backcountry Avalanche Safety. The presentation will include a review of the new Trailfinder on-line application, that Tony and Gillean have developed. Following that, Gillean will answer any questions we may have or discuss issues regarding the Kananaskis trails that we would like to raise. Here’s your chance to interact with the experts on K-Country.

The meeting will also include club announcements and updates.

Our October meeting, Tuesday, October 31, will land right on Hallowe’en night. Watch for announcements regarding the possibility of pumpkins and potluck!

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“NATURE” NEWS & NOTES

Add Raw Cacao to Your Trail Mix

Did you know that you can add unroasted broken cacao beans (also known as cacao nibs) to trail mixes or as toppings on dishes and desserts? According to an article in Rockies Health (Summer 2017 edition), cacao in its unprocessed, unroasted state has 119 times more antioxidant content than bananas, 20 times more than blueberries and four times more than its processed counterpart, dark chocolate. In addition, raw cacao powder can be blended into smoothies and other beverages (such as hot chocolate). To find out where to buy these products just Google them. It looks like Amazon, Walmart, Bulk Barn may be potential sources.

Banff and Canmore’s Bear 148

For those of you who have been following the saga of Bear 148 over the summer, here’s an update. This well-known grizzly was relocated out of Canmore on July 28 following several encounters with people in a heavily-used area, and moved 450 kilometres to a remote area of northwestern Alberta. According to the Rocky Mountain Outlook (Canmore’s weekly newspaper), a new GPS collar tracking 148’s movements shows that she has been criss-crossing back and forth between drainages in Alberta and B.C. but generally staying in the same area where she was released. She is most likely foraging on huckleberries in those drainages, according to provincial government sources.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

A Bird's Eye View

Hiking in an extreme fire ban area – A new experience for CORE members

The CORE group who participated in the recent Waterton Hiking Weekend quickly found out what it’s like to hike in an area being shut down and restricted hour by hour, initially due to extreme fire hazard and tinder dry conditions, and later due to an actual fire west of the national park – the Kenow Mountain Wildfire. We knew that certain trails would be closed before we left, but by the time we arrived in Waterton on Friday evening, the closure list had grown substantially. With limited trails still open, we were lucky to find two great hikes to do on Saturday (although one of them, Wall Lake, had a closure sign by the time we finished the hike, and the second one was closed the following day).

On Sunday, we were worried that no trails would be open and we’d end up renting paddle boards and eating ice cream along with the rest of the tourists. Fortunately, we had all brought our passports, so we hopped on a tour boat heading to Goat Haunt on the U.S. side of Waterton Lake. When we arrived back from the long hike along the shoreline, there was a letter attached to our motel door. Although not an evacuation alert per se, the letter warned us of a potential alert in the future. Despite the many challenges that the group faced, it ended up being a great weekend. Thanks to Anne-Marie for organizing it!

The fire recently spread into Waterton National Park, burned down the park’s visitor centre, and many people have been evacuated from southern Alberta communities.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

New Book Tackles the Complex Subject of Geology – Without Being Full of Technical Jargon

For those struggling to understand how the Rockies were made and shaped, there is a new book available that offers a friendly introduction to local geology. Primarily a driving guide, Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers: Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho, and Jasper National Parks is a 216-page guidebook, published by Broken Poplars, and written by Calgary geologist Dale Leckie. Launched in Calgary at Shelf-Life Books on July 26, Leckie’s book focuses on the geology of the main highways of Banff, Yoho, and Jasper: specifically, the Trans-Canada from Banff to Field and the Icefields Parkway (Hwy 93 north) from Lake Louise to Jasper.

Leckie begins with the big picture, reaching back in time to explain how the Rockies developed, before moving on to the eight colour-coded geological road trips, which are accompanied by full-colour maps, diagrams and photographs (and some art work). Along with the geology, Leckie apparently touches on the history, as well as the natural history, of each site.

It is well-written, easy-to-use, informative and jargon-free. Watch for it in local bookstores such as Chapters or Shelf-Life Books, or on Amazon.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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