November 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend

Reminder of CORE’s Annual Christmas Weekend is November 30 to December 2, 2018.  Snowshoe and Cross country skiing activities are planned. Staying at the Inn of the Rockies – Harvie Heights/Canmore.  Please refer to CORE Calendar for more information.

November CORE Meeting

CORE Xmas Party

November 27, 2018 Is CORE’s Christmas Party.  

There will be food, drinks, socializing, retelling of adventures past and planned, and a slide show of past winter activities. There will be a contest based on quiz questions from the Aug, Sept, Oct and Nov Newsletters and a Christmas song and slideshow featuring events from last winter’s activities.  Members and guests welcome. Join for a fun evening at Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14th Ave. S.W. 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the   executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

Remember there is no core meeting in December. The next CORE monthly meeting will be January 29, 2019

Coordinator Meeting Held  November 6:

A successful meeting with several coordinators and quite a few new winter trips put into the calendar to start off the winter activities.  Members posting calendar events should not send them out as email notifications more than one month in advance as this is adding to unnecessary emails which should be sent out near the event. Note that calendar events can be set up to send out emails at a selected number of days before the event.

CORE’s event coordinators have done some pre-planning for activities for this winter. These of course will depend on weather and the amount of snowfall. And more trips will be posted, sometimes on short notice. Members, please keep an eye on the CORE Activities Calendar for updates.  A summary of calendar events planned for the upcoming winter season is posted here as a blog on the CORE website.

CORE will offer Subsidized Outdoor courses for members:

If you would like to see a particular course (eg: first aid, gps, navigation, avalanche, x-country ski, other) subsidized by CORE from the Peterman Fund, please email CORE at mailbox@corehike.org

Members Corner

CORE Executive has agreed to have a “members corner” in the Newsletter.  This space is for all members to post personal items to sell or buy, trips that you are planning and would like a companion, etc..  Please see the Members Corner section near the end of the newsletter for further details.

CORE Twitter Feed Restored to the CORE Home Page

The CORE Twitter feed @corehike has been restored to the CORE Home page, with full 280 character and image capability. CORE communications for special events events, monthly presentations and weekly activities summaries, as well as occasional re-tweets of relevant outdoor-related posts (e.g. avalanche conditions, trail conditions) will now appear on the Twitter feed section of https://corehike.org/  .

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

October CORE Meeting

Lori Beattie’s presentation on Calgary’s Best Walks and Mountain Adventures was well received. With 34 members attending the presentation.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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October 27 Cochrane Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 28 Red Ridge Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 30 Sheep River Trail Mt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 31 Halloween Dance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 3 Brown Lowery Provincial Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 4 Bluerock Creek Trail

 

 

 

 

 

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November  10 Weaselhead Trail

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November 11 Jumping Pound Loop

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November 18 Stoneworks Canyon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

 Hundreds of Hectares of trees being removed from Jasper Park Area

Above the Jasper townsite, 350 hectares of trees are being removed as part of a wildfire risk reduction project. It’s an expansion of the community fireguard that has been maintained for the last 30 years. Thousands of pine beetle-infested lodgepole pine trees and mature spruce trees are being removed to make it easier for crews to battle a potential wildfire. The firebreak extends from Patricia Lake to Highway 16. A large number of hiking trails in the Pyramid Bench area are being impacted the tree removal. This project is expected to be completed by spring 2019.     Whistler Campground is receiving a massive upgrade that also, includes tree removal. 60 percent of the campground’s 100 hectare’s will be removed. Most of the trees are already dead or pine infested and are being removed for safety reasons and fire risk reduction. Some trees are being removed for construction to allow wider roads and sites. Campground will re-open in the spring of 2020.    Thousands of trees along the east boundary of Jasper National Park will be burnt to slow the spread of mountain pine beetles.

The Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor

A parcel of land in the Crowsnest Pass has been protected and named in honor of former premier Jim Prentice.  The Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor is roughly five kilometers wide from east to west. It will connect Crown forest reserve land in the north to the Castle parks, as well as to Waterton Lakes National Park in the south and the adjoining Glacier National Park on the U.S. side.  Officials with the Nature Conservancy of Canada said the project has international significance as it will allow wildlife to travel freely through the Rocky Mountains in Canada and the United States.  The Alberta Provincial government has given $1 million to this project.  The Nature Conservancy of Canada still needs to raise another $5 million to acquire the remaining 2200 hectares of this corridor.  The organization already has lined up multiple donors for this project.

 West Bragg Creek opens Three New Trails

On November 3, 2018 there was a grand opening to celebrate three new trails, The West Bragg Creek portion of the Great Trail, the new WBC Interpretive Trail and the WBC Provincial Recreational Area. For more information go to Bragg Creek Trails.

The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System will soon be in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need a annual winter pass.The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into Three Areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

The official beginning of the regular season at Canmore Nordic Provincial Park starts Saturday November 17, 2018

Avalanche Training Courses

Yamnuska Mountain Adventures is offering avalanche skill training and the principles of winter backcountry travel.  The organization is Avalanche Canada AST provider. They offer courses in Canmore/Banff and Calgary. For more information go to Yamnuska Mountain Adventures, Avalanche Course.

X-Country Ski and Snowshoe Courses

University of Calgary Outdoor Club is offering different levels of x-country ski courses from beginners to refresher courses.  You can rent x-country ski equipment from the u of c outdoor club as well. If you take a x-country ski course with this organization then you can receive a 10% per cent discount on x-country ski equipment rentals. The same applies for snowshoeing. Go to the attached link and search for snowshoeing. For more information go to UCalgary Outdoor Adult Active Living.

November is CPR month

Hopefully you will never have to use CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation).  To have this skill in case a fellow hiker, snowshoer, x-countryskier, family member or a friend needs your help is a life saver. Many work places now offer courses thru the organization’s wellness plans, plus there is outside organizations that offer CPR.  Interesting Fact:  Did you know that the Bee Gees, Abba, Justin Bieber, Adel and many more have an instrumental role in CPR??!!!  Their songs are used for counting the 100 beats needed to perform CPR!. There is a total of 47 songs. The Bee Gees,Staying Alive, is the number one song.

 Nature Calgary Speaker Series

Speaker Series November 21 7.30pm to 9.30pm will feature Hannah Lucas from Oceanbridge.  Hannah also works full time at the Calgary Zoo. Presentation is on “How the Oceanbridge program is engaging youth across Canada to actively participate in waterway and ocean health and education.”   For more information go to Nature Calgary’s Speaker Series 

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

November Newsletter clue: “What are the three types of traction devices to help you, in winter hiking?” The answer is in the “Hither and Yon” section of the November Newsletter.

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

  For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Winter Hiking

You Do Not Need to Stop Hiking in Winter!

Winter Hikers use three different kinds of traction devices, micro spikes, mountaineering crampons and snowshoes. Micro spikes and mountaineering crampons are used to provide traction on ice and packed snow. Snowshoes are used mainly to provide floatation on top of the surface snow. Micro spikes are used on fairly level hiking trails covered with packed snow or ice. And on steep slopes only packed with snow.  They provide extra traction that you need when your boot treads are no longer giving you traction. Mountaineering Crampons are used when you are on a higher angle that is ice or ice covered rocks or a mixture of ice and snow. That is when the longer and sharper traction aids are helpful. Micro spikes have too much give and the spikes are too short to penetrate deeply into ice when you need the device to hold your weight.

Snowshoe Anyone

Snowshoes are to keep you from sinking as deeply in the snow, as you would if you walked on top of the snow. Snow shoes also, help you conserve your energy. You do not have to pull yourself out of holes when you sink to your hips or waist. Snowshoes have crampons on the underside that provides the traction on snow or ice.  CORE member Carol had written an exceptional article in a previous CORE newsletter, on Snowshoes sizing, bindings, traction and heel lifts. With a video on further snowshoe tips. Plus, an article on different types of micro spikes and their uses. I have copied Carol’s article below.

 

 

 

 

Snowshoe Sizing

Snowshoe size is a key factor in getting the right amount of flotation. Generally, the heavier the person or the lighter and drier the snow, the more snowshoe surface area is required. Snowshoe size also depends on the type of activity you intend to do. For deep powder, a longer, wider snowshoe would be the most effective, but heavier and more tiring to use. Keep in mind that on CORE snowshoeing trips you are often on a trail where someone else has already “broken trail,” in which case you can use a smaller, narrower snowshoe – much easier and less tiring.

Men’s vs Women’s Gear 

Men’s snowshoes are designed to accommodate larger boots and heavier loads. For example, aluminum-frame snowshoes come in multiple sizes, usually 8″ x 25″, 9″ x 30″ and 10″ x 36″ or something similar. Women’s snowshoes tend to feature narrower, more contoured frame designs and sizes down to 8″ x 21″. Their bindings are sized to fit women’s footwear.

Easy-to-Fasten Bindings 

Make sure the bindings fit the boots you are going to be wearing, and that the fasteners are heavy duty (so they won’t break) and easy to secure and adjust.

Boa System for Bindings

By turning a wheel, a cable tightens evenly throughout the entire binding and heel for a secure fit. The binding also releases easily, making snowshoes with a Boa closure system one of the most user-friendly bindings.

Snowshoe Traction Devices 

Snowshoes for rolling or mountain terrain will come with toe crampons that rotate under the front of your foot to aid in climbing hills. Heel crampons are in a V shape and slow you down when descending hills. Look for both for casual snowshoeing in the Rockies. Some more rugged snowshoes may also have side rails (also called traction bars) to prevent slipping when crossing steep slopes.

Heel lifts

Also known as climbing bars, these are wire bails that can be flipped up under your heels to relieve calf strain on steep uphill sections and save energy on long ascents.

Watch this YouTube video , Tripper Girl for some further useful snowshoeing tips.

Another snowshoe tip blog is from hiking with Barry.

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OUTDOOR TRACTION DEVICES:

Highly Recommended by CORE for Winter Hikes and Outings

Kahtoola MICROspikes:

Cheryl with MICROspikes

Although the Kahtoola MICROspikes ($79 at MEC – November 2018) are perhaps a bit too aggressive for regular around-town sidewalk use, they are a good choice for all-purpose go-to option for longer hikes in mixed snow and icy conditions. Despite heavy use and abuse on everything from frozen streets to icy backcountry trails, they perform flawlessly and are incredibly durable. As a further testament, Backpacker magazine awarded the MICROspikes one of their 2012 Editors’ Choice Gold Awards, which honors exceptional outdoor gear that has withstood the test of time. As of 2018 Kathtoola micro spikes are still ranked in the top three for winter hiking.

 ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip:

The ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip ($49 at MEC, $55 at Atmosphere – November 2018) are a slightly different, slightly less aggressive take on the MICROspikes. They slip on using a similar stretchy rubber harness system, but instead of short, sharp vertical teeth underfoot, they use a lower-profile multi-toothed chain for grip. The ice trekkers diamond grip have some excellent reviews and are still in the top 5 for microspikes.

ICE trekkers Diamond Grip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hillsound Trail Crampon Traction Device:

The Hillsound Trail Crampon Traction Device ($65 at MEC, $65 at Atmosphere) They are lightweight which makes it easier to walk on ice and snow, has superior traction and stability and helps reduce muscle fatigue.  These Crampons feature a ergonomic plate system that stretch to fit with the sole of the boot. And elastic elastomer to stretch over top of the boot with an added strap to keep device secure.

 

Hillsound Trail Crampon

 

 

TIP: When buying any outdoor traction device, make sure that you buy them large enough to fit the boots that you will be wearing most often when using the spikes or cleats (which could be a size larger than your walking shoes).

 

 

 

 

 

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….see you on the trails …

Jane

By |Newsletters|Comments Off on November 2018 CORE Newsletter

CORE 2018-2019 Winter Schedule

CORE’s event coordinators have done some pre-planing for activities this winter. These of course will depend on weather and the amount of snowfall. And more trips will be posted sometimes on short notice, so, members, please please keep an eye on the CORE Activities Event Calendar for updates.

Dec 1 Sat
16:00 – 17:00

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend
Inns of the Rockies (Harvie Heights/ Canmore)

10:00 – 17:00

Snowshoeing day – part of the CORE weekend trip

Dec 2 Sun
16:00 – 17:00

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend
Inns of the Rockies (Harvie Heights/ Canmore)

09:30 – 14:00

Sawmill, snowshoeing, easy

10:00 – 17:00

Cross-country skiing, moderate rating but location is still TBD – part of CORE weekend trip

Dec 8 Sat 08:00 – 16:00

Backcountry Ski (Difficult rating, avalanche gear required)

19:15 – 21:30

Magnificat: A Christmas Celebration -concert by Festival Chorus

Dec 16 Sun 10:00 – 16:00

West Bragg Creek XC Ski (M)

Dec 18 Tue 19:00 – 20:30

Calgary Christmas Lights Walk (easy to moderate)

Dec 22 Sat 09:00 – 18:00

Chester Lake, mod, snowshoeing

Dec 27 Thu 09:00 – 14:00

West Crystal Line/Snowy Owl, West Bragg Creek, easy, snowshoe

Jan 6 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Rummel Lake, mod, snowshoe

Jan 12 Sat 07:00 – 16:00

Backcountry Ski Day (Difficult rating, avalanche gear required)

Jan 12 Sat 09:00 – 16:00

Snowshoe – Frost Heave Trail/Snowdrift Trail – Chester Lake area (M)

Jan 20 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Rawson Lake, mod, snowshoeing

Jan 26 Sat 07:00 – 16:00

Backcountry Ski Day (Difficult rating, avalanche gear required)

Jan 29 Tue 19:00 – 21:00

CORE Monthly Meeting. Presentation by a member of the Alberta Wilderness Association. “Wilderness Road Show”

Feb 3 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Marushka Lake, easy/mod, snowshoeing

Feb 10 Sun 09:00 – 17:00

Ranger Ridge snowshoeing (moderate rating)

Feb 16 Sat 08:00 – 17:00

X country Ski, PLP. Moderate, full day

Feb 23 Sat 09:30 – 16:30

X-C Ski – Bill Milne Trail – Kananaskis Village area

Feb 24 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Mt. Murray, easy, snowshoeing

Mar 3 Sun 09:00 – 18:00

Louise Creek, mod, snowshoeing

 

 

By |Special Articles|Comments Off on CORE 2018-2019 Winter Schedule

October 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Event Coordinator Meeting, November 6, 2018

Calling all hikers, snow shoers, x-country skiers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you.

This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.  The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on Tuesday, November 6, 2018, from 7 pm to 9 pm.  Contact information is on the  CORE calendar.

And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities.

Members Corner

CORE Executive has agreed to have a “members corner” in the Newsletter.  This space is for all members to post personnel items to sale or buy, trips that you are planning and would like a companion, etc..  Please see the Members Corner section near the end of the newsletter for further details.

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend

Reminder of CORE’s Annual Christmas Weekend is November 30 to December 2, 2018.  Snowshoe and Cross country skiing activities are planned. Staying at the Inn of the Rockies – Harvie Heights/Canmore.  Please refer to CORE Calendar for more information.

CORE Twitter Feed Restored to the CORE Home Page

The CORE Twitter feed @corehike has been restored to the CORE Home page, with full 280 character and image capability. CORE communications for special events events, monthly presentations and weekly activities summaries, as well as occasional re-tweets of relevant outdoor-related posts (e.g. avalanche conditions, trail conditions) will now appear on the Twitter feed section of https://corehike.org/  .

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 

October CORE Meeting – Presenting “Calgary’s Best Walks and Hikes” and Mountain Adventures 

October’s monthly meeting is on Tuesday, October 30 from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm at Scarboro Community Centre, 1727 – 14th Avenue SW

It will feature : Lori Beattie owner of Fit Frog Adventures, a company that is dedicated to making the outdoors accessible to all. She guides Calgarians and tourists year-round through Calgary neighborhoods, on urban nature hikes, and into the wilds of the Rocky Mountains. Lori is author of the book Calgary’s Best Walks and Hikes and her latest book Calgary’s Best Walks, as well as Calgary’s Best Bike Rides and Trails. Lori has shared her favorite walks on CTV Morning and Breakfast TV and she will now share her latest book, as well as some adventures in the mountains, with members of CORE at our upcoming meeting.

Members and non-members alike are invited to attend.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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September 23 Members at top of Overlook Rae Lake

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September 23 Powderface Ridge Memorial Hike

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September 30 Weaselhead hike group

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October 5 Music Night Older than Dirt Band

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October 7 Members at Glenbow Ranch Provincial Park, Cochrane

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October 14 – 17 Core members turn out for Powderface Creek Prairie Link hike

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October 20 Group members at Lake Minnewanka

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October 21 Silver Springs Escarpment Hike

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October 21 Staggered Pints at Triwood Community Centre

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 NEWS & NOTES

 Kananaskis Country 40 Years Old

The Alberta Government is putting 5.2 Million into Kananaskis Country to mark the 40th anniversary of the park. The park was officially opened September 22, 1978. Prior to 1978 the provincial government did not have an environmental plan for the crown land. Premier, Peter Lougheed recognized the importance of preserving the land for future generations to enjoy. The 5.2 million will be used to upgrade the Lower Kananaskis River and Barrier Lake area at the north end. Currently $700,000 is being used to restore Ha Ling Trail and three huts at Castle.

Conservationist calls for a cap on visitors to Banff National Park

A Banff conservationist is calling for a cap on the number of visitors to the national park. The amount of people is not only threatening the ecology of the park but the visitor experience as well. Especially the top attractions of Moraine Lake and Banff’s townsite. He believes the park needs to establish a limit on the number of people who visit the park on a given day. This could be done by setting up an online booking system.  Parks Canada stated 1.3 million people have passed through the gates in July and August of this year. Parks Canada is monitoring the situation, and currently has no plans for caps or quotas. They have put in bus shuttles to these attractions, and are having success with these alternative modes of transportation.

Friends of Fish Creek Speaker Series

Thursday – October 25, 2018 7 pm to 8 pm at Fish Creek Environmental Learning Centre – presented by Julie MacDougall – Senior Parks Planner South Region Alberta Environmental and Parks – Topic on “The Castle Provincial Park and Castle Wildlife Provincial Park” why the parks were established, and an overview of the conversation, wildlife, ecological values of the area and opportunities to work with the indigenous people to establish new recreational opportunities. Need to register thru Everbrite.

Nature Calgary Speaker Series And Annual Banquet

Nature Calgary’s Annual Banquet is November 10, 2018 featuring the wardens. For more information go to Nature Calgary’s Annual Banquet .

Speaker Series November 21 7.30pm to 9.30pm will feature Hannah Lucas from Oceanbridge.  Hannah also works full time at the Calgary Zoo. Presentation is on “How the Oceanbridge program is engaging youth across Canada to actively participate in waterway and ocean health and education.”   For more information go to Nature Calgary’s Speaker Series

Canmore Nordic Ski Club – Swap and Consignment

CONSIGNEE DROP OFF & EARLY BIRD TICKETS:

Saturday, November 3, 2018, 9:00am – noon, Bill Warren Training Centre   Early Bird Tickets : $20 per person purchased at Consignee Drop-Off. Limited to 100 tickets.

SALE:

Sunday, November 4, 2018, from 10:00 am to noon,  9 am for early bird tickets – Bill Warren Training Centre.  For more information go to Canmore Nordic Ski Club website

Foothills Nordic Centre – Lifesport Ski Swap and Consignment

October 27 to October 29, 2018   Friday 4 pm to 8 pm, Saturday and Sunday 10 am to 6 pm. Consignments now being accepted. Location 1110 Gladstone Rd NW. For more information go to Lifesport Ski Swap

Banff Mountain Film and Book Festival

Feature films, photography and books on mountain culture, including mountain art and craft sale, music and free events. Starts October 27 at 10am, to November 4, 2018 at the Banff Centre.  For more information go to Banff Mountain Film and Festival

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

October Newsletter clue: “How many meters approximately, should you be away from the bear for the spray to work effectively?” The answer is in the “Hither and Yon” section of the October Newsletter.

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

For sale – pair of metal-edged XC skis with bindings. Length 185 CM. Well used. Waxable. Selling for $20. Contact Stu at studotocox@gmail.com for more info/photos, or come to the October 30 members meeting to have a look. 

 

Adventure Stories

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

 TOP Larch Hikes in Bragg Creek, Banff, Kananaskis Country and Calgary

Bragg Creek: 1. Prairie Mt Trail   2. Elbow Valley to Riverview Trail  3.  Boundary Ridge Trail  4. Strange Brew Trail  5.  Ranger Summit Trail

Banff:  1.  Taylor Lake  2. Saddleback Trail  3. Lake Agnes  4. Arnica Lake  5. Larch Valley and Sentinel Pass

Kananaskis Country:  1. Mt Loretta Ponds  2. Chester Lake  3.   Burstall Pass  4. Rawson Lake  5. Ptarmigan Cirque

Calgary: 1. Confederation Park  2. Edworthy Park  3. Fish Creek Provincial Park  4. Nose Hill Park  5. Weasel head Flats

 

 Bear Spray

Whether you are hiking, biking, picnicking, camping, trail running or paddling in any provincial or national parks, you do not know if you will meet up with a bear or other wildlife. You should be prepared by carrying bear spray.  It can help reduce serious injury if you are in an aggressive bear or wildlife attackUsing bear spray is the last resort.

Bear Spray is a non-lethal, non-toxic deterrent that causes temporary eye tearing and respiratory distress to the animal. It is a deterrent containing capsaicin.

The cannister releases a cone shaped cloud of pepper spray to a distance of approximately 5 m and at a speed of over 100 km/hr..

Before you hit the trails, read the instructions, carry in a holster you can reach with your dominant hand. Practice using the spray to become familiar with the spray radius and your reaction time, and to ensure the can is working properly.

Remove the safety clip and aim for the bears face, ensure nozzle is pointing away from you. Give quick one second bursts until the bear retreats and leaves immediately.

Link to Video by Parks Canada demonstrates “How to use bear spray”:

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….see you on the trails …

Jane

 

 

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September 2018 Core Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Event Coordinator Meeting, November 6, 2018

Calling all hikers, snow shoers, x-country skiers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you.

This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.

The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Place and Time will be announced shortly in the CORE calendar.

And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities.

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

September CORE Meeting – Presenting “Walking the 88 Temple Pilgrimage in Shikoku Japan”

September’s monthly meeting is on Tuesday, September 25 at Scarboro Community Centre. It will feature a slide show: “Walking the 88 Temple Pilgrimage in Shikoku Japan”, presented by CORE member Kiyoko.  The 88 Temple Pilgrimage is Japan’s most famous pilgrimage route, a 1200 km loop around the island of Shikoku. While most modern-day pilgrims (an estimated 100,000 yearly) travel by tour bus, a small minority still set out the old-fashioned way on foot, a journey which takes about six weeks to complete. Kiyoko and 3 friends undertook this journey in 2007, and the story of their odyssey promises to be very interesting, so don’t miss it

Members and non-members alike are invited to attend.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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Sept 1 Foran Grade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 3 Mist Mountain – Their finest hour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 9 Rawson Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 15 At the top of Pocaterra Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept 15 Pocaterra Ridge Views of the mountains around

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Courses

Regretfully, the Executive had to make the difficult decision to cancel the Wilderness First Aid Course scheduled for Saturday, September 22 due to lack of participation. It was rather surprising as the last time this course was presented it was very well attended and the feedback was excellent.  Thank you to those who sent comments from which, it seemed more a question of scheduling than lack of interest, but that will always be the case.  The Executive will now discuss whether to put this, or another course, on in the near future.

 

Cold and Wet Weather

The weather is starting to get cooler outside, bringing rain and snow.  Ensure you bring a warm layer of clothes and weather resistance gear on your outdoor events.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

September Newsletter clue: “Which type of bear has the longer claws?” The answer is in the Hither and Yon” section of the September Newsletter.

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Hither and Yon

 


 

 

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

 

 

 

 Bear Smart

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Know your different Bears:
    1. Grizzly bear has pronounced shoulder hump, may have silver or grey hairs on face, back and hump, ears are round, nose is pig like, claws longer 7.5 to 10 cm in length.
    2. Black bear are more uniform in colour, nose is dog like, claws are short 2.5 cm in length.
  2. Bear Signs: bear tracks, bear trails, scat, rolled logs and rocks, torn stumps, rubbed chewed and claw marked trees, diggings, ant hills torn up.
  3. Avoid encounters:
    1. Make lots of noise.
    2. Travel in groups.
    3. Walk pets on leash.
    4. Be aware of your surroundings.
    5. Recognize signs of wildlife.
    6. Carry bear spray and know how to use.
  4. If you encounter a bear:
    1. Stop, Never Run
    2. Stay calm and size up the situation
    3. If bear is unaware of your presence, back away slowly the way you came.
    4. If bear is aware of your presence, talk calmly and back away slowly.
    5. In a defensive encounter, if a bear comes within your range, use your bear spray, if bear makes contact play dead.
      1. If attack continues fight back, act big and loud, use your bear spray, attack the eyes and nose.

For more information on handling bears and another wildlife encounters visit Wildsmart at:

  http://www.wildsmart.ca/

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….see you on the trails …

Jane and Stu

 

 

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CORE August 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Seeking Communications Coordinator to Publish the CORE Newsletter

Despite the personal satisfaction in putting together the CORE Newsletter each month, your current author is spending more time in administrative duties than he is on the trails. He needs your help. If you could find the time to put together and publish the small online monthly newsletter, we need you! This is an Executive position as Communications Coordinator and we would of course like to fill it as such, but if you could take on just the newsletter task, then we would be very grateful. Interested? Please email the Executive at mailbox@corehike.org, or contact Carol or Stu for more details on what is entailed.

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

Monthly Presentations

Our Presentation planner(s) have have done a great job in finding presenters for the monthly club meetings at the Scarboro Community Centre, right through to the end of the year, some by club members relating their adventures, and others by very interesting outside presenters. Members and non-members alike are invited to attend. If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for August. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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Golden Hikes

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Golden Scrambles

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Day Hikes

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NEWS & NOTES

Courses

CORE will be sponsoring a Wilderness  First Aid course. This is a one-day, non-certification course, similar to the very successful one we had a couple of years ago. The course will be mostly funded by the club from the Peterman Endowment Fund, but there will be a small registration fee. The planned date is is September 22 at the Bragg Creek Community Centre. Please stay tuned for further information – we’ll post it on the calendar as soon as we have everything firmed up.

Injury Avoidance and Fitness Exercises

The CORE August presenter was chiropractor, Dr. Colin Johnston, who summited Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in 2016. Out of that experience he has developed a set of exercises, particularly in regard to the knee area, to mitigate injuries when participating in strenuous activities. He has kindly provided CORE with a description of some exercises to improve knee streangth. A link to the PDF file, including his contact information, is provided on the CORE Safety Guidelines page.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

The Executive is initiating a contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month (beginning with the August newsletter), there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried withing the newsletter. Collect all the clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for the prize.

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

August Newsletter clue: What is the “Hither and Yon” section of the August Newsletter about?

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Hither and Yon

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

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Ten Daypack Essentials

“Be prepared.” These words of wisdom have been echoed by scout leaders, guides, and seasoned outdoor lovers for generations. It’s true. Weather can change quickly and the unexpected can happen. To manage the risk, add these essentials to your backpack before your next daytrip on the trail. (full descriptions can be found on the ViewRanger link. ViewRanger is a digital APP used for GPS navigation).

  1. Food – Don’t go hungry or skimp on calories.

  2. Water – 4-6 liters or water per day or more if you’re hiking in extreme heat.

  3. Torch or headlamp – It’s no fun to walk–er, stumble–in the dark.

  4. Fire starter – It’s darn near impossible to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together.

  5. Navigation – Map, compass, and app.

  6. Sun protection – Protect yourself with proper sunglasses, sunscreen, and sun hat.

  7. First-aid kit – Injuries may happen when you least expect it, so carry a compact first-aid kit.

  8. Knife – There are countless uses for a knife in the outdoors.

  9. Extra Clothing – Weather can change quick in the countryside and mountains. Pack layers.

  10. Shelter – If your daytrip is super ambitious, demands long hours or distances, or wanders into extreme conditions, consider carrying a lightweight bivvy sack or space blanket.

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….see you on the trails …

Stu

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CORE July 2018 Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Shuffleboard

We’ve done a slight rearrangement of roles on the Executive. Stu C. will take over the Communications Role including the Newsletter, and David v.d.E. will continue to contribute as a Member as Large.

Welcome Back Mike

Our friend and hiking companion Mike G. is back to resume his Executive Trip Coordinator duties, after undergoing a pretty serious medical procedure. At times I’m sure it was like dangling from a rope 1000 metres up and catching the tip of your pick axe in a precarious niche on the rock face. Welcome back Mike!

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

Car Pool Rates

With the ever escalating gas prices, the Executive has opted to raise the suggested amount to compensate the driver when you are car-pooling. Please follow these sliding-rate guidelines. The rate is for regular gas per KM round trip for the vehicle / number of people in the vehicle.

Gas above $1.30 per litre: $0.30 per km

Gas between $1:00 and $1.30 per litre: $0.25 per km

Gas below $1.00 per litre: $0.20 per km

For trips within one of the Mountain National Parks (Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, Waterton, Yoho) passengers share equally with the driver the one-day entrance fee per car unless the fee is on a per person basis.
The final decision on prevailing gas prices is the Trip Coordinator’s (ie if prices are on the cusp and there is a disagreement between a driver and passenger on which rate should apply).
Remember the golden rule.  Your driver went out of their way to transport you safely on the outing, sometimes over dusty roads. If the car pool fee amounts to, say $13, you could round it up to an even $15 to help pay for a carwash.

For further information about CORE Carpooling guidelines, please visit the Carpooling and Locations page.

Monthly Presentations

We are fortunate to have monthly presentations at the Scarboro Community Centre planned right through to September, some by club members relating their adventures, some by very interesting outside presenters. Members and non-members alike are invited to attend. If YOU have an idea for a presenter who would be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar since our last newsletter. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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June 17 – Black Prince Cirque – Sun and Snow

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June 17 – Descent from Castle Mountain Lookout

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June 24 – Wind Ridge

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July 1 – Grass Pass

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July 14 – Upper Kananaskis Lake – Sarrail Creek Falls

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July 21 – Sibbald Lake Flora

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July 22 – Sherbrooke Lake and Mt Ogden from Paget trail

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July 28 – Centennial Ridge

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July 28 – Ribbon Creek to Troll Falls

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July 29 – Sunshine Meadows – The Lake Circuit

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NEWS & NOTES

Parking in the National Parks

Parks Canada has recently been strictly enforcing prohibitions on parking on the sides of several roads in Banff.  There is now a web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/Banffnow   which shows roughly current availability of parking at a large number of locations you can zoom in on.  The conditions are quite consistent, however, not varying much even on weekends.  The following guidelines may therefore be more useful when planning a trip:

In the cases of Lake Louise and Moraine Lake, road access to the lots is closed to avoid people circling around.  THIS MEANS THAT MORAINE LAKE IS INACCESSIBLE AFTER AROUND 8 AM, AND LOUISE AFTER AROUND 10:00, ALL DAYS OF THE WEEK—even as early visitors leave the parking lots largely empty.  It also means that Paradise Valley trailhead is inaccessible after 8 AM.  (Shuttle buses do not stop there.)

There are several other points to consider:

  • There are free shuttles from the Lake Louise Overflow Parking East of the town interchange to lakeside—BUT THIS LOT IS ALSO FILLED AS EARLY AS 11:00.
  • Louise shuttles run every 15 minutes but THE LAST BUS LEAVES LAKE LOUISE AT 5:30.
  • The Parks will apparently run free shuttles to Moraine Lake from the same overflow area in September—BUT CURRENTLY SHUTTLES ARE PRIVATELY OPERATING AT $25 ROUND TRIP.  Check with the Lake Louise info center for where they leave from, times, and possible need to book ahead.
  • Johnston’s Canyon and Upper Sulphur Hot Springs lots are also generally full by noon, and sometime also Lake Minniwanka.
  • Several other lots with yellow warning labels have NOT been shut so far (over 10 days in July).  This includes Yoho Valley, Emerald Lake, Bow Lake, Peyto Lake, Bourgeau Lake, Redearth Creek, Marble Canyon, and Stanley Glacier.  It is likely fine to plan trips there but early arrivals are recommended. 
  • The websites “last update” times are 24 hour format for EASTERN time, 2 hours ahead of us (i.e. later).  A second column is just a copy in AM/PM format but 4 hours ahead, meaning unknown.

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Hither and Yon

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

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A little inspirational hiking poetry

Tyler C Nelson  – Mt. Baldy
a misty start with worlds to go
a walk through forest, desert, snow
with altitude and dizzy joy
a challenge which my strength employs
a peaceful summit waiting warm
where thought and poetry find form
from near the sun our minds turn
to worlds below we will return

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….see you on the trails …

SC

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June 2018 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

The AGM

CORE held its annual AGM on May 29 with a membership attendance of about 45 people. The business part of the meeting saw the election of a full slate of Executive members to guide the club for the coming year. See the “Meet your new Executive” paragraph below for your new executive members.

The members in attendance passed a motion to waive membership fees for the following year for Executive members who serve the full year on the Executive.

The minutes for the CORE 2018 AGM are available on the CORE website at this link.

The “social” part of the evening included recognition of the club members who have organized summer and winter events throughout the year, presenting of the “Chicken Mountain Award” for the leader of the hike most gone awry – Harvey earned the title  this year -, and a well laid out table of food and refreshments, again, thanks to our energetic and well organized past executive.

Renewing Your Membership

CORE’s new online membership and electronic payment APP has been very successful, with around 100 members signing up by the time of the AGM. A few memberships were submitted as paper hand-written forms at the AGM, but we hope in the future to keep these to a minimum to help streamline the membership signup process and, of course, save paper.

 

Trip Photography

July 2017 East End of Rundle Summit

One very successful feature at the AGM was a photo slide show with pictures from almost every outing from May 2017 to May 2018. There were 125 great photos of places and people to remember from the previous year’s activities, and this was only possible to compile thanks to the great photographs posted on the website by participants in the events. To all you club photographers, please keep up the good work, and remember to post your photos. It helps some of us remember where we’ve been, and certainly makes our club website more interesting.

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You could be the next Event Leader!

—In case you wondered, last season from June 2017 to May 2018,  CORE volunteers put on around 140 hiking, city walks, snowshoeing, skiing and cycling events, plus another 37 socials such as dinners, tennis, skating, slo-pitch, movies, music, Trail Fest, and CMC presentations. These don’t just happen. Last year there were just 10 members who put in most of the effort to organize events. It takes a bit of time but we could use some more volunteers to organize outings and keep the calendar populated with interesting activities. If you have some ideas about trails to explore, or if you would like to get some ideas from people who have done lots of trails, and would like volunteer to organize some trips, please contact executive at mailbox@corehike.org, talk to an event leader when you are out on a hike, or come to one of the CORE monthly meetings.

June 26, CORE Monthly Meeting

Cambodia, land of Angkor Wat, Mekong River, and the Famous “Tuks Tuks”

Mark June 26 on your calendar as long time member, Jeanette, takes us on a colourful journey through much of Cambodia, where she was joined by Harvey and Carol, other long time CORE members.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

May/June 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for mid May to mid June. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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May 19 – Tennis anyone?

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May 20 – Kananaskis – Terrace Trail

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May 25 Long Prairie Ridge and Macabee Creek Loop

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May 26 – Barrier Lookout

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May 29 – When shall we four meet again, at the next CORE AGM

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June 2 – A mountaineering K9 on Wasootch Ridge

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June 2 – Break time on Wasootch Ridge

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June 9 – Grotto Canyon

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Meet Your New Executive

For the 2018-2019 club year we have a full slate of Executive members whose goal is to ensure that activities are run safely, keep the membership informed about what is happening within the club, as well as in the wider outdoor community, organize training programs and presentations, and maintain the website so we can continue to provide online information and the events calendar for the club. Here is your executive for the coming year:

Chair – Julia Trangeled

Julia is a longtime CORE member and has served may times on the Executive. She is an avid summer and winter activity participant, and is one of the organizers of weekend events, as well as weekday evening urban hikes.

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Co-Chair – Jeanette Nelder

Jeanette hails from Kiwi land and is also a long time member of the club and has served several time on the Executive. She is an efficient organizer.

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Treasurer – Craig Morris

Craig has taken on the task of treasurer for the second year now and has been key to getting our online membership payment  system up and running.

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Secretary – Laura Hood

Laura is new to the Executive this year and has volunteered to take on the role of Secretary. After participating in many enjoyable core outings, she felt it was time to get more involved to ensure the good times continue.

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Membership Coordinator – Marian Smith

Marian also has been a member of CORE for many years and has served on the Executive before. This year she has volunteered to take on one of the more challenging executive positions, that of Membership Coordinator. Thank you Marian.

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Executive Trip Coordinator – Mike Galbraith

Mike has been around the club for a long time and has filled various roles on the executive in the past. He is also a member of the Calgary Mountain Club, as well as serving on the executive of the UIAA – the international federation for climbing and mountaineering, so he knows a little bit about safety in the mountains. His role is to monitor and coach our volunteer event organizers to ensure basic practices are followed to keep participants safe on the trails.

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Communications Coordinator – David van den Eikof

Dave is an avid summer season hiker and event organizer for some of the more difficult terrain in the mountains. He too has spent more than his fair share of time on the executive in various roles. He is also a keen photographer and amateur artist.

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Presentations Coordinator – Kim Payne

Kim has been in the club for a few years, and spent her first year on the executive getting our club banner (as in physical banner) and an excellent first aid training course that year. This year she means to line up some interesting presenters for our month-end club meetings.

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Website Administrator – Stu Cox

Stu hails originally from the east coast, so came to mountain pursuits rather late. He is now a great believer in the slogan you see on the sign entering Yoho National Park – “The mountains shall set you free”-. Somehow he fell into the role of CORE Webmaster about 8 years ago, and has so far been unable to convince anyone else to take on the task.

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Member at Large – Kevin Jones

Kev moved from the UK, with Sarah, in 2012 to take advantage of the mountains without having to fly transatlantic to do so.  He has been a member of CORE for about four years, and enjoys hiking in the summer and tries to find time for cross country skiing, downhill skiing and snowshoeing in the winter.  Having joined the Executive for the first time at the 2018 AGM he is wondering what is really involved in being a ‘Member at Large’.  So if you have a suggestion or constructive criticism that you want to feed into the Executive, Kev is a point of contact for you.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Tick bite prevention during tick season

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard, city parks and paths.

Some of the best ways to avoid tick bites are: wear clothing that covers your arms and legs; tuck your pants into your socks or even put tape around openings in clothing so ticks have no access; and wear light-colored clothing to help you see if a tick is on you. When you are in the woods, keep to the centre of the trail, where ticks are less likely to be (ticks tend to stay in shrubs and bushes).

Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin.

  • As soon as you are home, check yourself or have a family member help check you for ticks. Use a fine-tooth comb through your hair and check folds of the skin. You should also shower and wash your clothes at a high heat so any ticks are killed.

The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses are:

Fever/chills 
With all tick-borne diseases, patients can experience fever at varying degrees and time of onset.

Aches and pains 
Tick-borne disease symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity and time of onset of these symptoms can depend on the disease and your personal tolerance level.

Rash 
Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia can result in distinctive rashes

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

Charming Spring © Patricia L. Cisco

Reminiscent melodies
serenade the morning breeze.

Feathered creatures nest with care
in cherry blossoms pink and fair.

Perfumed scent of roses flow.
Tiny blades of green grass grow.

Misty showers soak the earth,
glorious colors come to birth.

Gathering clouds come and go,
rain, sun, and vibrant bow.

Dainty petals, fancy flair,
dancing in the warm, sweet air.

Violets, yellows, purest white,
graceful, gentle, welcomed sight.

Thank you, oh sweet lovely Spring,
patiently waiting the charms you bring!

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/charming-spring

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For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment. Please submit via email to mailbox@corehike.org.

….see you on the trails …

SC

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May CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Renewing Your Membership – Join now online before the AGM

For all current members, if you haven’t renewed your membership yet, sign up now and pay online ahead of time to make it quicker and easier for you and the membership coordinator. Or at the AGM — If you do intend to sign up at the Annual General Meeting, please submit your membership form online and provide a copy of your confirmation email with your signature and payment to the membership committee at the AGM.

CORE’s Website now has Security Certificate

Recently CORE’s website provider, Nucleus, provided an SSL certificate (security certificate) for the club’s website. Rather than seeing http://corehike.org, you will now see https://corehike.org. Typically, SSL is used to secure credit card transactions, data transfer and logins, and more recently is becoming the norm when securing browsing of social media sites.

Special Motion at AGM

Members attending the AGM will be asked to vote on the following motion:

“Do you agree with waiving membership fees for those who volunteer for the executive each year?”

To qualify for a free membership, volunteers on the executive committee would have to serve a full term, and receive the free membership at the end of their term. Waiving membership fees would give the club the means to thank those on the executive committee and to acknowledge their hard work and commitment.

June 26, CORE Monthly Meeting – Cambodia, land of Angkor Wat, Mekong River, and the Famous “Tuks Tuks”

Mark June 26 on your calendar as long time member, Jeanette, takes us on a colourful journey through much of Cambodia, where she was joined by Harvey and Carol, other long time CORE members.

Participating in the BUY & SELL Event at the AGM – be sure to read!

backpack

For those wishing to participate in the buy-sell event at the AGM, it will commence after the business part of the meeting (in conjunction with the Social gathering). There will be some tables set up to display items for sale, swap or give-away. All sellers should have their items tagged beforehand with their name and the amount they would like to get. All negotiations are strictly between buyer and seller, and the club has no part in the sale other than providing the venue. Please try to come early with your items. The community hall doors will be open at 6:30.

Brand new Salomon boots and skis

This backpack, and brand new Salomon x-c skis and boots will be some of the items at the sale. The boots and bindings use a double bar system. The Salomon boots are women’s size U.S. 6.5 (UK 5), light grey, Sian7 Pilot.

 

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

April/May 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for April 21 – May 16. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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April 21 – Mysterious Maze – Three Sisters Pathway, Canmore

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April 22 – Johnston Canyon “Spring” Hike

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April 29 – A Sunny Spring Day on Fullerton Loop

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May 5 – Beautiful Scenery in Bow Valley Provincial Park

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May 12 – Upper Stoney Trail hike – through lovely mixed forest

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May 16 – Urban hike – Edgemont Hills, they “Rock”!

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MAY MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14 Avenue S.W.

Tuesday, May 29   7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AND SOCIAL

All members are invited and encouraged to attend the club’s AGM on Tuesday, May 29th. It’s always a fun, diverse and enjoyable evening, featuring food and refreshments, a chance to swap stories of adventures past and yet to come, plus the honour of helping to elect a new executive committee for 2018-2019. Happily, this year we already have nominations for a number of executive positions. There will be the annual anointing of the Chicken Mountain award winner, special recognition of trip coordinators, and door prizes. We will also have a “Buy-Sell” event of new/used equipment and clothing. It promises to be a full evening, with something for everyone!

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These CORE members are having fun at one of our AGMs! You can, too, on May 29th.

Pat and Mark

 

 

 

 

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Marvella and Cheryl

 

 

 

 

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Tick bite prevention during tick season

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard. Some of the best ways to avoid tick bites are: wear clothing that covers your arms and legs; tuck your pants into your socks or even put tape around openings in clothing so ticks have no access; and wear light-colored clothing to help you see if a tick is on you. When you are in the woods, keep to the centre of the trail, where ticks are less likely to be (ticks tend to stay in shrubs and bushes).

Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin.

  • As soon as you are home, check yourself or have a family member help check you for ticks. Use a fine-tooth comb through your hair and check folds of the skin. You should also shower and wash your clothes at a high heat so any ticks are killed.

The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses are:

Fever/chills 
With all tick-borne diseases, patients can experience fever at varying degrees and time of onset.

Aches and pains 
Tick-borne disease symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity and time of onset of these symptoms can depend on the disease and your personal tolerance level.

Rash 
Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, and tularemia can result in distinctive rashes

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BIRDS EYE VIEW

Trip coordinators – Here’s a K-Country hike to try this spring and early summer if you’re looking for great views.

Prairie View Trail to McConnell Ridge or Barrier Lake Fire Lookout is a good hike to do when it’s super windy, as the trees provide shelter from the wind. When you finally break out of the trees at McConnell Ridge, you are rewarded with views of Barrier Lake, Mount Baldy and beyond. There’s a fun little scramble to a higher viewpoint (not recommended if icy), as well as the option to hike up to Barrier Lake Fire Lookout offering 360 views. Return the way you came for the quickest way down. 13.2 km return, 421 m elevation gain. Add on 0.7 km, 100 m elevation gain to the Fire Lookout.

Check this website for other spring/fall shoulder season hikes in Kananaskis Country:

http://www.playoutsideguide.com/2016/11/best-shoulder-season-hikes-kananaskis.html

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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April CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Nominee at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a few positions available for nominations (i.e., Presentations Coordinator, Communications Coordinator and Membership Coordinator). If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Other Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has recently learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline for Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the coming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

REMINDER: CORE’S BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

For further details please visit the Kananaskis Trails website at: http://kananaskistrails.com/ha-ling-upgrade/2018/

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

March/April 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 21 – April 14. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

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March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

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March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoe Gang

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April 1 – Chester to Sawmill snowshoe – Admiring the View Across Valley

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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April 14 – Chris, Ewa and Geoff on Sulphur Mountain Trail

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April 14 – Harvey, Ewa and David at Sulphur Mtn. Summit

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APRIL MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14 Avenue S.W.

Tuesday, April 24   7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Presentation: Tour of South Africa: Cities, Parks, Flora and Fauna

Please join us for our April Monthly Meeting. Following club announcements and updates, our presentation will feature a South African adventure. In 2016 Julia, a long time CORE member, took a trip to South Africa via Dubai.
Going from Dubai, a high end, over-the-top city, to relaxing Cape Town, was a study in contrasts, but both were fascinating in their own way. Table Mountain was a sight to see (on a non-cloudy day). A trip via the beautiful Garden Route led along the coast to Plettenburg Bay and then to the safari park to see “the big 5”, the most amazing enclosed bird sanctuary and a town built on canals. Incredible mountain scenery led through ‘ostrich country’ with enormous caverns, to Stellenbosch in the wine region outside Cape Town where the wines and the scenery vie for first place.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Grizzly Population Stable in K-Country

According to the latest DNA census in Alberta’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

An excerpt from Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

Bears Coming Out of their Dens

Parks Canada confirmed the first sighting of a grizzly bear on March 24 along the Bow Valley Parkway. It’s believed to be male grizzly 122 – also known as The Boss – the largest, toughest and most dominant grizzly bear in Banff, Yoho and Kootenay national parks.

Keep Your Dog on a Leash

BANFF – Keep your dogs on a leash protest song is barking at off-leash pooch walkers in Banff National Park.

It’s illegal to feed, disturb or entice any wildlife in national parks and because an off-leash dog can aggressively confront wildlife such as grizzly bears and elk, there are strict regulations in place. For some further background information about the rules and some Banff local musicians’ efforts to spread the word, please visit this Rocky Mountain Outlook page.

http://www.rmoutlook.com/article/Protest-song-urges-dog-owners-to-keep-pets-leashed-20180412

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment and Parks  https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…These names may bring back happy memories growing up on a farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites, or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes: bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we might drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

10 Suggested Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

CORE Event Coordinators – Try to add some of these hikes to the club calendar this spring

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle

    View from Tunnel Mountain

  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake
  • Johnston Canyon
  • Lake Louise Lakeshore

For more information on these hikes, visit:

https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

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….see you on the trails …

CM

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March CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

2018-2019 CORE Executive – Coming Together, One Volunteer at a Time

The current executive, made up of Julia, Stu, Pat, Mary, Jeanette, Craig and Carol, would like to thank the CORE members who have agreed to be nominated for the 2018-2019 executive. Their names will be put forward at the club’s Annual General Meeting on May 29. There are still a couple of positions available for nominations. If you would like to volunteer or nominate another member, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Photographers and Coordinators – re: photos

Please remind participants, especially new members, that photos taken on CORE or joint CORE/Calgary Ski Club trips may be posted on the CORE website and/or used at other CORE venues. The executive has learned that not everyone is aware of how trip-related photos are being used.

May 15 – Deadline – Chicken Mountain Award Nominations

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have less than a month to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org. At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of a trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

 

REMINDER: CORE’s BUY/SELL EVENT – Tuesday, May 29

Do you have used hiking, skiing, snowshoeing, biking, climbing and/or scrambling gear and apparel that’s collecting dust and cobwebs in your basement or garage? Bring these items to the Scarboro Community Hall on May 29, and CORE will give you the opportunity to sell, swap or give these items away.

Tables will be available for your items. Sellers will be responsible for displaying prices and collecting money from their buyers. CORE is just providing a venue for bringing buyers and sellers together. The executive will send out further details in May.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

February/March 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for ?????  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

………………………………………………………………………………………

March 21 – Bob, Kim, Julia, Carol – Fox Creek Trail

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March 24 – Rawson Lake Snowshoe Gang

………………………………………………………………………………………

March 24 – Canmore Nordic Ski Trails near Meadow Hut

………………………………………………………………………………………..

March 31 – Colourful Hogarth Lakes Snowshoers

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April 7 – Boom Lake Snowshoers and their Shadows

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????? Chester to Sawmill – Admiring the View across the Valley

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FEBRUARY MONTHLY MEETING

Members and Guests – Please join us at Scarboro Community Centre, 1737 – 14th Avenue S.W. Tuesday, March 27, 7:00 p.m.

Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks

Following club announcements and updates, our guest presenter will be Dale Leckie, author of a recently published book called Rocks, Rivers and Ridges: The Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Parks.

An award-winning geologist and best-selling author, Dale will guide you through the Canadian Rocky Mountain National Parks. The story of the Rockies, its rivers and valleys, glaciers and hot springs, caves and karst, mountain building and erosion unfolds.

With eye-catching illustrations and photographs, this presentation blends story telling with science and natural beauty with easy to understand explanations. Be prepared to be amazed by the story written in the Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers. Dale’s book will be available for sale. You can pay with cash or credit card. The cost is $28.00 cash and Dale pays the GST. If a credit card is used, the cost is $27.95 plus GST.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

 

According to the latest DNA census in the province’s bear management area five (BMA5) – an approximate 10,000 square km area, which includes Canmore and K-Country – there’s an estimated 16 grizzlies per 1,000 sq. km in the northern portion of the management area, which takes in K-Country.

Based on DNA results and modelling programs, researchers have come up with an estimate of 96 grizzlies (52 females and 43 males) in the 6,000 sq. km northern section. According to John Paczkowski, an ecologist with Alberta Environment and Parks, who spoke at a WildSmart Speaker Series presentation in Canmore, March 20, “The take-away message is that the population (of grizzlies) in K-Country is stable and slightly increasing.”

Rocky Mountain Outlook March 29, 2018

 

Construction Advisory – Ha Ling Peak Trail Realignment

There will be construction activities taking place April through September on the Ha Ling Trail in Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park. Heavy equipment and crews will be on site completing a variety of trails improvements. Intermittent full-mountain closures will occur throughout the above time frame to accommodate safety, particularly during high risk construction activities. Caution should be used, particularly around heavy equipment, and all posted signage should be obeyed.

The Wonderful World of Wetlands

Posted on March 21, 2018 by AB Environment & Parks (https://albertaep.wordpress.com/2018/03/21/the-wonderful-world-of-wetlands/)

Sloughs, potholes and marshes…The names may bring back happy memories growing up on the farm, less happy memories of itchy bug bites or perhaps you haven’t thought about wetlands since grade 5.  In Alberta, wetlands are grouped into five classes; bog, fen, marsh, swamp and shallow-open water. While they are sometimes thought of as a lightweight player in the world of water, these underestimated water-features do a lot of heavy lifting when it comes to a healthy environment.

So why should we care about that marsh we drive past every day? Because while we are waiting for the coffee to kick in and are just starting to function – it is already hard at work! Filtering out sediments and nutrients, which improves both the surface and ground water quality, they are a natural at removing harmful contaminants from the water. By storing water during times of flood, and releasing water during times of drought, wetlands can help mitigate flood and drought risks to landowners. Wetlands provide critical habitat to many types of plants and animals and are known to be one of the most productive ecosystems in the world.

10 Early Season Hikes in Banff National Park

  • Tunnel Mountain. At 1,692 metres high, this little mountain is perfectly positioned for the best views of the Banff townsite and Mt. Rundle
  • Hoodoo Trail
  • Marsh Loop
  • Sundance Canyon Trail
  • Fenland Trail
  • Sulphur Mountain
  • Minnewanka Lakeside
  • Johnson Lake

 

For more information on these hikes, visit: https://www.banfflakelouise.com/blog/10-early-season-hikes-banff-national-park

 

 

 

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW


 

 

 

 

….see you on the trails …

CM

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