May/June 2021 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

CORE’s New Executive for the 2021 to 2022 year:

CORE’s current executive would like to thank members for stepping up and volunteering on the 2021 2022 executive. There was a 39% member respondent to the survey, for the election of the 2021 2022 executive. And a big thank you to last years volunteers.

CORE’s 2021 2022 Executive:

  • Chairperson – Mike G.
  • Co-Chairperson – Kim
  • Secretary – Polina
  • Treasurer – Jane
  • Membership Coordinator – Laura
  • Executive Trip Coordinator – Carol
  • Communications Coordinator – Mike P.
  • Presentations Coordinator – Kim
  • Webmaster – Stu
  • Member-at-Large – Pam

Note: see below on How to Contact Your Executive.

CORE’s AGM meeting May 25, 2021:   

A very successful virtual CORE AGM meeting was held on May 25. With 27 CORE members in attendance.  At the meeting, the 2020 Annual General Meeting Minutes were approved.  Election results for 2021 2022 CORE Executive were given, with highlights of activities/events. Two Honorary Lifetime Membership Awards were given out and the Chicken Mountain Award.

CORE membership for 2020 – 2021 was a total of 113 members (single 76 and Family 37).  Total Events for the year was 114.

The three top trip coordinators appreciation awards for the 2020 2021 year was given  to Harvey Kwan (17), Carol Miyagawa (15) and Cheryl Beatty (14).

Julia Trangeled

Honorary Lifetime Membership Awarded to Two CORE Members:

Cheryl Beatty

CORE recognized Cheryl Beatty and Julia Trangeled with an Honorary Lifetime Membership to CORE. Both members have coordinated trips, served on the CORE executive, helped organized many of the long weekend trips and many other contributions to this organization, for many years.

The Chicken Mountain Award

Jane and Carol with their Chicken Mountain award

The Chicken Mountain Award was handed out to Carol and Jane for the misadventures that happened on the Cascade Ponds Hike on March 12th, 2021. Carol and Jane will be sharing this prestigious award. Note: Jane has already named the chicken, George. At the Heart Creek Bunkers, a young family was very curious why, Jane was carrying George the chicken. After explaining, to the family, besides a few giggles from them,they thought this award was a great ideal.

 

 

 

 

CORE 2021 Summer Trip Planning

On June 17, a summer trip planning meeting was held. Led by Carol, CORE’s executive trip coordinator, with many plans for hiking, biking and scrambling events were discussed. These events will be entered on the calendar, with details to follow. Keep referring to CORE’s event calendar and watching for email notifications of these events. Have a great summer.

CORE 2021 Summer Weekend Event

Floe Lake Kootenay National Park

Organized by Julia Tr and Anne-Marie, CORE will be holding a summer weekend retreat in Radium Hot Springs, B.C..  The weekend get away will be held August 13 to 15, 2021 Does hiking and maybe a cool down in the hot springs to relax your sore muscles interest you?!  There is many activities to do in Radium. Hiking, Biking, Golfing, River Rafting and much more. Great chance too get away!!!       There already has been email notifications sent to all members regarding the summer weekend event.

 

Remember these summer events and summer weekend event could be changed due to the continuing COVID -19 by the Alberta Government regulations.

June 29, 2021 at 7 pm CORE’s Members Meeting (Virtually of Course):

Living together in Harmony

Members and Guests please join us for June’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 29, 2021, from 7 pm to 9 pm.

Bear Safety Presentation (Virtual)

Videos will be from 7pm to 8.30pm

Presentation for CORE’s June members monthly meeting is a Bear Safety Presentation. This meeting is virtual. These videos will introduce the physical difference between black and grizzly bears. As well as the differences on handling the two types of bear encounters. Each type of bear requires a different way that you should talk and present yourself to that bear. The 4 different types of bear encounters and what you need to do to defend yourself in each type of encounter. Also, how to keep yourself bear safe (as much as possible), and how to use the different bear deterrents.

At the end of each video, members may participate with their own bear stories and/or advice is most welcomed. Having some real-life experiences is always a good learning opportunity.

You must register/signup for this meeting. Kim has sent out a CORE calendar invitation to all members. You will need to register to receive the Zoom meeting link.

These videos are for everyone, for beginners to refreshers for the experts.

This year, there has already been more bear/human encounters than past years. And there has already been 3 tragic bear/human encounters. Remember you the hiker/cyclist/scrambler are going into the bear’s home, and disturbing them. Treat the Bears with Respect.

Meeting will be open at 6.45pm for members to socialize prior to the videos starting and there will be an opportunity to socialize after the videos as well.

 

 Hwy #40 Peter Lougheed Provincial Park to Highwood House Junction ReOpens June 15

Prior to heading out for a hike/cycle/scramble or climb, check the trail closure reports. There are still many trails that are closed due to seasonal wildlife crossings/ecological and construction. Below are links to trail reports for Alberta Provincial Parks and Parks Canada.

 

June 1, 2021 CORE has reopened for events/activities again.                       

CORE is Back to putting on events as of June 1 2021

CORE executive has re-opened for events and activities again, as of June 1. Member participation in activities/events will be based on the Alberta Government COVID-19 regulations. These regulations are constantly changing due to the pandemic requirements. CORE executive will be following these changes in regulations and its effects on the organizations ability to carry out events and activities. CORE executive appreciates your patience during these unprecedented times.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepared???

Hiking Apps – Something for Everyone

Ever wondered when technology would reach the backcountry? The good news: it already has. There are plenty of apps and hiking companions that offer navigation and guidance without the need to be connected to WiFi.  Click here for a comprehensive guide.

 

 

 

 To All CORE Outdoor Event Participants:

Social (Physical) Distancing for COVID 19

The club executive met (virtually of course) and talked about the current COVID-19 situation in Alberta.

The club announced, by a calendar notification to all members,  that CORE will be re-opening effective June 1, 2021.

The Alberta Gov’t announced effective June 14, Monday outdoor sporting events will be open to a total of 20 members/event. The number of members allowed on an event will be determined by the coordinator, as there are many circumstances the coordinator needs to take into account.   All members must still social distance (2 meters/6 feet) during the hike (event) and when you cannot social distance, you must wear a mask. (e.g. at the trailhead, parking lot). Please go to “Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19Pandemic.” See link below.

Thank you for helping us to keep our club members safe.  

The CORE Executive.

 

CORE, ACTIVITIES/EVENTS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC:

CORE executive has put in place guidelines and recommendations for trip coordinators, and COVID-19 guidelines for keeping members safe, when participating in CORE activities/events. CORE executive would like to thank all CORE members that put on hikes, bike rides, urban walk’s, etc. for their club members during this unprecedented time.

Spring is now with us. More activities are planned for the coming months. Continue to watch your emails and CORE calendar for activities/events.

Members are encouraged to read the Guidelines “Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19 pandemic.”

If the province of Alberta mandates different requirements, the organization may have to make appropriate changes.  If the situation changes a newsletter with the updated information will be sent to the members.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos:

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

Highlights of Activities/Events

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar of hikes from April 16, 2021 to June 15, 2021. During this time, due to Alberta Gov’t Restrictions, CORE had to stop events for 3 weeks. Effective June 1, 2021, CORE is able to resume events. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent and past activities.

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April 30 2021 Vents Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 30 2021 Vents Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 1 2021 Moose Meadows Loop WBC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 11 2021 Heart Creek Trail and Heart Creek Bunker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 12 2021 Edgemont Ravines Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 12 2021 Wasootch Peak Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 13 2021 Banff Legacy Trail Bike Ride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News and Notes

Lake Louise and Moraine Lake – 2021 New Parking Fees in Place

Lake Louise Shoreline and Moraine Lake Parks Canada Shuttle Routes

If you are planning on hiking in the Lake Louise and Moraine Lake area, Parks Canada has put in new parking regulations:

  1. Reservations are required to get a seat on a Parks Canada shuttle to Lake Louise Lakeshore or Moraine Lake, this includes return shuttle. Walk up seat sales are not permitted. Effective June 1 to October 11, 2021.
  2. Book your seat on the Parks Canada Shuttle by using the Parks Canada Reservation system which opened April 28, 2021. A portion of seats will be released in a rolling window, 48 hours prior to departure day. Cost for an adult is $8, Senior $4, Youth (6 to 17) $2, Child (under 6) $free.
  3. Roam Public Transit will operate without reservations. Roam routes 8x and 10 (from Banff), stop at the Lake Louise Park and Ride and can be used to transfer to a Parks Canada shuttle, that you have previously reserved.
  4. There will be paid parking in effect for all public stalls in the Lake Louise Lakeshore parking lot from May 14 to October 11, 2021 from 7am to 7pm daily. Look for pay stations when you arrive. Cost is $11.70 per vehicle per day.
    1. You cannot stop and wait in the parking lot hoping for another vehicle to leave.
    2. You must have a valid national park entry pass.
  5. Moraine Lake vehicle parking is permitted free, when parking is available at Moraine Lake. Travel to the lake is restricted once the parking lot fills and there is no space to wait for parking stalls to become available.
  6. Access to Paradise Valley trailhead will also be restricted when parking lot is full. There is no cost for parking at Paradise Valley.
  7. There is NO parking fee in the Village of Lake Louise, Moraine Lake, the Park and Ride lots and all other day use lots across Banff National Park. Including the parking lot at the Great Divide.
  8. You can also inquire at the Lake Louise Visitor Centre for details or contact Parks Canada at Lake Louise by email or call 403-522-3833.
  9. For more information go to Parks Canada – Lake Louise website.

Kananaskis Conservation Annual Pass

Kananaskis Country

Effective June 1, 2021,  you will need to purchase a Kananaskis Conservation Pass.   Sales of the pass starts June 1, 2021.

Passes are available online or can be purchased in person or by using Wi-Fi at Kananaskis Visitor Information Centers (Barrier Lake, Elbow and Peter Lougheed) and the Canmore Nordic Center Lodge. To purchase the Kananaskis Conservation Annual Pass online or for more information click on the link.

  • Day Pass – costs $15 (registers one vehicle only) – day passes expire at 11.59 pm on the day the pass was purchased
    • National Park Day Pass is 24 hours from date and time of purchase.
  • Yearly (Annual) Pass – cost $90 (registers up to 2 vehicles) – valid for a full calendar year (365 days) from date of purchase. E.G.: You purchase an annual pass on June 1, 2021, expires on May 31, 2022.
    • Note: You can change your vehicle plate number on the annual pass once per year.
    • National Park Annual Pass, expires one year from month you purchased and runs to the end of the month you purchased. E.G. Bought June 1, 2021 Expires June 30, 2022.
  • Both Passes: you will not receive a hanger tag or sticker, it is done by a database holding your license plate number.
  • Both Passes: when you purchase your pass, you will receive via your email a confirmation of your purchase. You can print this confirmation out and use for backup.

This pass applies to all personal vehicles stopping in parks and public lands in Kananaskis Country and the Bow Valley Corridor.

Passes do not apply for vehicles traveling thru the area without stopping and people arriving in the area without a vehicle (on foot, horseback, bicycle)

Note:   The Editor would like to give a big Thank You to the staff at the Barrier Lake(Kananaskis) Visitor Information Center for helping me get set up with my Annual Kananaskis Conservation Pass on June 1, and answering my questions. The staff were very courteous and helpful. Thank you again, and Welcome Back.

Getting my pass at the visitor center was very easy (especially with the help of the staff). Everything was pre-set up on a big IPad and already linked to the secure Alberta Government website.

How the pass is enforced:

  • License plates of vehicles stopped or parked in Kananaskis will be scanned. Visitors can purchase their passes before midnight on the date of their visit, even if their plate has already been scanned. Meaning you can purchase your ticket when you get home, as long as it is by 11.59 pm that day.
  • Owners of non-compliant vehicles may receive a warning or be sent a fine in the mail.
  • Information on fine amounts, fine payment processes and timelines will be shared by June 1, 2021.
  • This pass will also eliminate the cross-country ski pass needed in K-country.

Per Jason Nixon – Environment Minister – in 2020 the area attracted 5.4 million visitors, which is 1 million more than Banff National Park. since 2014, visits in the area have increased 70%. Resulting in over flowing garbage cans, illegal parking, more injuries that need rescues, overcrowded trails and day use areas and conflicts between people and wildlife. The pressure on this park is not sustainable.

The fees will help to:

  • Reopen visitor centers (e.g. Barrier Lake Visitor Information Center).
  • Traffic management.
  • Hire more conservation officers, to help with public safety and human and wildlife encounters, search and rescues, education and environmental conservation.
  • Conservation activities.
  • Grooming of cross-country ski trails.
  • Keeping trails safe.

To see the Areas of Kananaskis country and Bow Valley Corridor that are affected by the new pass and to purchase your day or annual pass go to Alberta Parks website.

 Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There have been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

 

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Adventure Stories

 

Hiking Quote by Beverly Sills

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hither and Yon

CORE Members in the cold war era Bunker

Government of Canada’s Cold War Bunker in the Bow Valley

In the Bow Valley, near the Heart Creek Trail, there is a large tunnel in the north facing slope of Mount McGillivray. This bunker was part of a Cold War-era plan to store important federal government records and keep them safe in the event of a disaster, including a nuclear bomb. 

A main tunnel goes more than 55 metres deep into the mountain with another side tunnels going 40 metres deep, branching off just after the entrance.

In the 1960’s a company called Rocky Mountain Vaults and Archives Ltd., based in Calgary, stated they have the ability to keep documents safe within nearly 275 metres of limestone, with no underground water penetrating the structure. The Canadian Government hired Rocky Mountain Vaults and Archives to create a tunnel to hold important documents. The company obtained licenses to begin construction in 1969, they had actually started tunneling before 1966. The original plans for the bunker called for a system of impenetrable chambers and vaults built right into the mountain, which could have served for government officials in case of a disaster. The plans grew, as the bunker was to become a self-sufficient in the case of disaster. The bunker would be built for maximum protection. Emergency electricity, temperature controls, air exchanges and communication systems were planned. If there was a catastrophe, from a fire to a nuclear war they could seal off the bunker and survive in the tunnels.

The company was also, in negotiations with the Royal Bank of Canada to house bank records in the vault. When this arrangement failed, without any other committed clients, the company went bankrupt. The project was abandoned and left as is.

 

Heading out of the Bunker

An interesting fact: the prime minister in 1966 when the Alberta bunker was commissioned was Lester B. Pearson. The prime minister in 1969 was Pierre Trudeau. Both led Liberal Governments. The premier of Alberta in 1966 was Ernest Manning, in 1969 was Harry Strom, both belonged to the Social Credit Party of Alberta.

Another interesting fact: It was speculated that all Western and Northern premiers(including cabinet) would actually live in the Alberta(Heart Creek) bunker. All Eastern premiers and the Federal government would live in the Diefenbunker.

The Federal Government stopped funding the Alberta bunker as water had become an issue. There was a high level of moisture inside the cave. Limestone is a porous rock that will admit above and underground water thru cracks in the rock. The federal government based the funding on an understanding there would be no underground water or moisture problems as documents had too stay dry and be mildew free.

The federal government did continue funding on the Diefenbunker. The Diefenbunker was completed and it stood 4 stories tall, was 100,000 sq ft. built under ground in Carp, Ontario. By the time it was completed, the Cold War was over. It has now been turned into a museum.

 

A reminder of every member’s responsibility to keeping yourself and your fellow hikers safe, during this unprecedented time.

Six feet/two metres Social Distancing requirement by AHS and CORE guidelines

Every member in this photo is a minimum of six (6) feet/two (2) metres apart, for social distancing guidelines.

Reminders:

Bring a mask in case you cannot social distance – 6 feet/2 metres, or you need to go into an indoor area and even for use in the parking lot area.

Stay six feet/2 metres for social distancing when hiking and other events. Also, at rest breaks and lunch.

Remember, This Too Shall Pass!!

 

 

Have Fun and Stay Safe!