Executive News

Remember No August 2019 CORE Member Meeting

September 24, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for September’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

September Presentation by Norseman Outdoor Specialist

Norseman Outdoor Specialist is one of the oldest outdoor stores in Calgary. They specialize in technical cross country skiing, hiking, and climbing equipment.

Anthony from Norseman Outdoor Specialist will be doing a presentation on Winter Safety Gear and Winter Clothing to be wore. More details to follow in CORE’s September Newsletter.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

We are now about halfway through our summer season, with lots of outings planned for the rest of July, August and September. If you would like to join any of our hikes or courses, you must be a CORE member. You can submit a membership form online  and pay your fees by credit/debit card. If you wish to pay your membership fee by cash or cheque, please complete the Membership Form online,  indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque, and mail your fees to the address indicated on the webpage. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to include a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email) along with your payment.

As a ps, please remember that the CORE executive members are volunteers and have real jobs besides managing CORE activities. Electronic payments are generally processed in a couple of days. Mailed forms and payments may take a couple of weeks before you get your membership card and access to the Event Calendar.

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July and August 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for July 15 To August 14, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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July 21  4 Lakes Vista Arnica Twin Lakes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 21 Fox Creek Summer Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 25 Healy Simpson Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 28 Rainy Summit Sunrise Elbow Valley Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 2 Coleman, Crowsnest Pass Weekend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 3 Crowsnest Mtn Chinook Lake

 

August 3 Crowsnest Mtn Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 3 Livingstone Range Chert Quarries Hike

 

August 3 Livingstone Range Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 4 Phillips Pass Hike

 

August 4 Table Mtn Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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August 7 Yoho Iceline Trail Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Ha Ling Peak

Ha Ling Peak Trail Reopened

Ha Ling Peak Trail reopened on August 9, 2019 after a one-year closure.

Alberta Parks stated, The Trail needed upgrading due to erosion, which was damaging the trail’s ecosystem and creating safety issues (steep sections) for users. Portions of the old trail were exposed to avalanche hazards and endangered white bark pine trees growing on Ha Ling were vulnerable to damage from hikers.

Cost of the upgrade was $850,000. The contractor put in hand railings, ladder staircases and more than 400 overlapping rock steps. The also, made the slop more scenic, clearing out some trees and putting in benches at viewpoints along the route. The trail is a lot wider in some areas, and they have made it less steep in other areas. The construction took longer than expected due to weather.

The Ha Ling Trail can see 600 people climb the steep, three – kilometer hike during high season each year to the summit, states Alberta Parks.

Hikers struck by lighting storm in Banff National Park

A woman was hiking on Mount Bourgeau at about 1 pm on July 20th when a storm rolled in and was either struck by lighting or had a strike near her. She was knocked out by the lighting strike. When she regained conscious she called Parks Canada, not knowing where she was. Parks Canada pinpointed her location using her phone through the 911 system. Parks Canada then responded by helicopter and transported her down to the EMS crew at Sunshine Village. She was taken to Calgary for treatment of burns on various parts of her body. The woman was hiking above the tree line at about 2800 to 2900 metres.

Another pair of hikers were caught in the same storm, and were struck by lighting while hiking on Mount Temple. The hikers reported that their legs were burned, pants caught on fire and the force of the strike blew their shoes off. These hikers were above Sentinel Pass at and elevation of about 2800 to 2900 metres. There were above tree line as well.

Being struck by lighting is not common. You need to be aware of any thunderstorms coming in, especially if you are above tree line. If you are injured by lighting strike in the national parks, contact Parks Canada right away, so they can respond as quickly as possible.

Follow up to the Three Bear Cubs found in Banff Washroom

Two of the three bears are being tracked by Parks Canada, and are currently feeding in a Banff Parks Valley along with 63 other bears. Parks Canada still does not know how the three cubs got into the washroom.

Lake Louise Shuttle lineups testing tourist patience with long waits

Long line ups for Lake Louise shuttles is testing visitor patience at some popular spots on the August long weekend. Most passengers had to wait one and a half hours to two hours, to get from one destination to the next in Banff National Park. The shuttles run every 15 minutes from Lake Louise to Moraine Lake as well as other spots in the park. Each bus holds 44 people and riders have to wait in the line to buy tickets for each individual shuttle.

Some visitors missed their bucket list destination because of the lineups. One tourist stated she wanted to see Moraine Lake. They were shuttled up to Lake Louise, then they got into a one-way system which they assumed was going to Moraine Lake, instead they were taken back down to the park and ride area. On asking a Parks Canada employee, she was told that the Moraine Lake tickets were sold out. She and her husband waited an hour an a quarter in the park and ride. And Parks Canada was not taken cash only debit or credit cards which slowed the procedure down again.

This tourist stated “she would like to know why Parks Canada did not inform them, that tickets to Moraine Lake were already sold out when they were in the initial lineup.”

There were two hour waits at the Lake Louise Gondola.

Tourism director for Banff and Lake Louise stated “that tourists need to plan ahead due to the congestion in the mountains during summer months.” Parks Canada, The Town of Banff and Tourism for Banff and Lake Louise have created a resource that shows different ways of getting around Banff National Park. On explore the park website it shows you which parking lots are full and offers other options like Roam Transit and Banff Parking.

 Parks Canada adds new Signage on the Outhouses at Lake O’Hara

New signage is popping up in the Canadian Rockies to show international visitors on how to properly use the outhouses. Staff at Lake O’Hara in Yoho National Park have installed toilet etiquette signs, which ask users to sit rather than stand on the toilet seats in outhouse facilities in June. Per Jed Cochrane, acting visitor experience manager for Banff, Yoho and Kootenay National Parks, “some international visitors who are not used to western-style toilets, have attempted to stand up on the seats, when using the toilet.” “Standing on a toilet can lead to a broken seat or seal at the bottom of the toilet as the weight is higher up than it should be. And there is the risk of falling in.” Canada’s National Parks are seeing an influx of international visitors who are not used to this style of toilet.

Yoho Toilet Signs

Jia Wang, deputy director of the China Institute at the University of Alberta, states “this is a cultural difference in how toilets are used and the sanitary conditions.” “Squat toilets are still commonly used in public spaces. For a lot of people, their argument is: I don’t find it sanitary to be sitting on the seat.” She did state “there is no excuse for standing on a toilet.” “By offering alternatives or seat covers, some tourists would be more comfortable using it.”

These tourists need to recognize that they are in front and back country (not a city)- there is no luxury here! Editors opinion.

Parks Canada are considering adding toilet etiquette signs in other locations, like Lake Louise. They have started using signs with pictures rather than words to help tourists who cannot speak English or French.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outside Magasine has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There are some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.  

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by Beverly Sill

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Heat Related Illness:

Heat Cramps:

Heat Cramps are painful muscle cramps, usually in the legs and/or abdomen, caused by losing too much water and salt through sweating. And by exercise or physical work in a hot environment.

Symptoms of Heat Cramps:

  •  Cramps
  • Excessive sweating. In a dry environment (hot, sunny day) the person may not seem to be sweating, as the sweat evaporates quickly.

First Aid for Heat Cramps:

  • Give conscious person water or drinks with electrolytes and carbohydrates. Person can have as much as they want.
  • If cramps don’t go away, continue to hydrate.

Heat Exhaustion:

In hot weather, your body cools itself by sweating. the evaporation of the sweat regulates your body’s temperature. When you exercise strenuously or overexert in hot, humid weather, your body is less able to cool itself efficiently. The person has lost fluid through sweating. Circulation is affected because the blood flows away from the major organs and pools in the blood vessels just below the skin.

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion:

  • Excessive sweating
  • Dilated pupils
  • Person may complain of dizziness, faintness, blurred vision, headache or cramps
  • Cool, moist skin
  • Week rapid pulse
  • Rapid shallow breathing
  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Low blood pressure upon standing
  • May go unconscious
  • Heat Exhaustion could lead to Heat Stroke if not dealt with quickly

First Aid for Heat Exhaustion:

  • If person is conscious:
    • Stop all activity and rest
    • Move to a cooler place
    • Give water or drinks with electrolytes and carbohydrates
    • If person vomits give nothing by mouth
    • Place person in a resting position or on back in a cool place
    • Remove extra clothing and loosening tight clothing at the neck and waist
  • If person is unconscious:
    • Place in a recovery position
    • Monitor ABC’s (Airway, Breathing, Circulation)
    • Get help as soon as possible.

Heatstroke (Sunstroke):

Heatstroke is a life-threatening condition where the body’s temperature rises far above normal. It is caused by prolonged exposure in a hot, humid environment. The body’s temperature control mechanism fails, sweating stops and the body’s temperature rises rapidly. In exertional heatstroke, the body’s temperature rises rapidly due to the heavy physical exertion in higher temperatures, even though sweating continues. This  condition needs to be treated immediately, as it can cause permanent brain damage or death.

Signs of Heatstroke (Sunstroke):

  • Body temperature rapidly rises above 40 Celsius or higher, the person is hot to the touch
  • Pulse is rapid and full but gets weaker in later stages
  • Breathing is noisy
  • Skin is flushed, hot and dry or hot and sweaty in exertional heatstroke
  • Person is restless and may complain of headache, fatigue, dizziness and nausea
  • Vomiting, convulsions, unconsciousness

The difference between heat exhaustion and heatstroke is the condition of the skin. Heat exhaustion skin is moist and cool, while heatstroke the skin is hot, flushed and maybe dry or wet.

First Aid for Heatstroke:

  • You urgently need to lower the body temperature of the person
  • Move the person to a cool, shaded place
  • Cool the casualty, remove person’s clothing(discreetly) and place in cool water
    • Or put ice around the person
    • Or put cool wet sheets or clothing over the person
    • Sponge the person with cool water
      • Put water, ice or wet cool items around the person’s armpits, neck and groin areas
  • When person’s body feel cool to touch, cover with dry sheet or clothing
  • Put the conscious person in a comfortable position
  • The unconscious person put in the recovery position
  • Keep monitoring person
  • If temperature begins to rise again repeat the cooling process
  • Seek medical aid right away

Precautions to prevent Heat Related Illnesses:

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight clothing – wearing excessive clothing or tight fitting clothing will not allow your body to cool properly
  • Protect against sunburn – sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself,  wear a wide brim hat and sunglasses and use sunscreen with a high SPF. Apply sunscreen generously and reapply every 2 hours or more, especially if you are sweating
  • Drink plenty of fluids – staying hydrated will help your body sweat and maintain a normal body temperature
  • Take extra precautions with certain medications. Watch for heat related problems if you take medications that can affect your body’s ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat
  • Take it easy during the hottest parts of the day – slow your pace down
  • Get acclimated to the heat – until you are conditioned to the heat, limit your exercise time

       TAKE CARE, AND HAVE FUN!!!!!!

                                                                                                                            

 

 

 

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….see you on the trails …

Jane