Executive News

 

July and August 2019 CORE Monthly Meetings

At the June CORE meeting a vote was taken to amend the Bylaws to remove the frequency  of CORE monthly meetings, so that the Executive can decide when monthly meetings should take place. The vote was unanimous from the members.  Consequently, it was announced that CORE would not hold meetings in July and August this year. CORE monthly meetings will resume September 24, 2019.

Upcoming CORE Special Events:

August 2 to 5 – CORE’s Annual August Hiking Weekend in Crowsnest Pass

Members wishing to join the group in Coleman for the hiking weekend should book their accommodation as soon as possible, while there are a few rooms remaining. All details on CORE calendar.

August 11 to 15 – Four Days in Jasper – Hiking and Scrambling

Three CORE members are planning a trip to Jasper from August 11 to 15 and have invited other CORE members to join them. You need to arrange your own accommodation and travel. Go to the CORE event calendar for more information.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

We are now about halfway through our summer season, with lots of outings planned for the rest of July, August and September. If you would like to join any of our hikes or courses, you must be a CORE member. You can submit a membership form online  and pay your fees by credit/debit card. If you wish to pay your membership fee by cash or cheque, please complete the Membership Form online,  indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque, and mail your fees to the address indicated on the webpage. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to include a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email) along with your payment.

As a ps, please remember that the CORE executive members are volunteers and have real jobs besides managing CORE activities. Electronic payments are generally processed in a couple of days. Mailed forms and payments may take a couple of weeks before you get your membership card and access to the Event Calendar.

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

June and July 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for June 15 To July 14, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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June 15 Karst Springs and Mt Shark Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 16 East End of Rundle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 22 Yamnuska Circuit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 26 Beehives and Devils Thumb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 29 Booze Broads and Brothels Historical Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 29 High Noon Hills and Sheep River

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 30 Bow Valley Provincial Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 30 Door Jam and Loder Peak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 3 Lady MacDonald Slow and Steady

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 7 Pigeon Mt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 13 Ptarmigan Cirque and Arethusa Cirque

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 14 Porcupine Ridge Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Banff Black Bear feasts on Illegal Camper’s Food

On June 12, 2019 an illegal camper called 911, just before midnight, stating that a black bear had raided his unsecured food for an hour, just meters away from his tent. Charges are pending against the illegal camper. He had set up a tent in the woods near Fireside day use area on the Bow Valley Parkway. Per Banff National Parks, “the bear got into all his food, this was a substantial food reward, and this bear is at risk of becoming food conditioned.” The area of Bow Valley Parkway,  where this man was illegally camped, is closed overnight at this time of year to provide space and security to wildlife, such as bears and wolves. Illegal camping is dangerous for visitors and wildlife and it puts other future visitors at risk if its causing food conditioning in bears. Parks Canada also stated the man was lucky, once the bear was finished with the food, the bear could have gone for the tent, where the man was huddled. Illegal campsites have no bear-proof bins for garbage.

By the time wildlife specialists arrived at the illegal campsite the bear had moved on. A trap was set up later in an attempt to capture the bear. Bears can become bolder around people once they developed a taste for human food. Parks Canada continues to monitor this situation.

The number of illegal campsites in Banff National Park  has been increasing over the last few years. Parks Canada has a zero tolerance for illegal camping. They state illegal camping can lead to more issues of food conditioning of wildlife.

Alberta Parks issues warning for Food Conditioned Fox

Conservation officers state that a red fox is approaching people to within a few feet in search of food. The fox has been reported in the area of Sundance Lodges on Highway 40. This fox has been approaching campsites, and picnic areas. People need to securely store all food and potential attractants so this fox does not get any more human food. If this fox is in the vicinity and smells human food it will approach. You need to scare the fox away by acting assertive and aggressive and not letting the fox close the space between the food or a toddler.

Foxes are not very common in Kananaskis country, but there have been frequent sightings reported along Highway 40 between Barrier Lake and Kananaskis Golf Course.

Anyone caught feeding wildlife in Kananaskis Country can be issued a $287 fine and evicted from the facility.

Parks Canada monitoring a collared Banff Wolf

Wildlife specialists are monitoring a yearling wolf from the Bow Valley pack. The young gray coloured female wolf was captured and fitted with a GPS in May near Tunnel Mountain campground, allowing her movements to be tracked. The wolf has not shown any signs of aggression, but shows indifference towards people, even within close range in daylight and has been curious around vehicles. The wildlife specialists are trying to stop the wolf from becoming food conditioned. Once animals get a taste for human food, it is really hard to change their behavior.

These specialists state “Anytime an animal becomes food conditioned, whether it’s wolves or bears or foxes, it increases the risk to people, but also to the animals. We will more likely have to kill a food conditioned animal if they start acting aggressively towards people to get food. That is why, you never feed or entice wildlife.”

Great Horned Owl

Grassi Lakes, Canmore,  Climbing Closures for Nesting Owls

Some climbing routes are closed at Grassi Lakes to avoid disturbing the nesting owl site. The closure, which is in place each year to protect the great horned owls nesting in the rock face, applies to the left side of the Graceland rock climbing area, including You Ain’t Nothing But a Hang Dog, Memphis and It’s Now or Never.

The great horned owl is Alberta’s provincial bird and is commonly found throughout Alberta. Their nesting sites can vary widely, and include stick nests of other birds, snags, large tree cavities, cliff ledges, rock outcrops and caves. Pairs mate for life and share the duties of raising owlets. In Alberta, two to three eggs are laid in late February and early March. If the first clutch is lost, the female may lay a second clutch, usually with fewer and smaller eggs.

 

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outside Magasine has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There are some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Links

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

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For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environmentmailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

World Heritage Sites

Alberta’s Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Alberta’s Write-On-Stone Provincial Park

This year there are 35 new sites being nominated by their respective countries.  There are currently 1092 World Heritage sites across the globe. Canada currently has 20 natural and culture sites.

To be granted UNESCO World Heritage status to landmarks or areas deemed to have cultural, historical, scientific significance, which then go on to be legally protected by international treaties.

This year, the only Canadian site being considered is Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park and was nominated by Parks Canada and the Government of Canada. On July 6, 2019 Writing-On-Stone was given the status of UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park is currently a provincial protected prairie land and now an UNESCO World Heritage Site. This site is home to more than 50 Indigenous rock carvings and paintings. The Bradshaw Foundation (A Geneva based non-profit organization) calls the park the “largest collection of First Nation rock art on the Great Plains of North America.” There is evidence that people have been living in the area for 9,000 years.

UN states Canada’s plan to rescue Wood Buffalo National Park is not sufficient enough

The status of Canada’s largest park as a world heritage site remains in limbo after a United Nations body expressed major concerns about a federal plan to rescue the National Park. Canada needs to put more effort into reversing the negative affects of climate change combined with upstream industrial developments and resource extraction are intensifying, in a draft decision on Wood Buffalo National Park from UNESCO, which manages the UN’s list of World Heritage Sites.

Wood Buffalo, is situated on the Alberta-Northwest Territories boundary, and is one of the world’s largest freshwater deltas and breeding grounds for millions of migratory birds from four continents. The park is almost 45,000 square kilometres of grasslands, wetlands and waterways. It is the world’s only breeding ground for endangered whooping cranes and home to the world’s largest herd of free-ranging wood buffalo. First Nations depend on this area.

Wood Buffalo has been deteriorating for decades. In 2014, the Mikisew Cree asked UNESCO to examine the park and see if it still a merited designation as a World Heritage Site.

The UNESCO report prompted Ottawa to commission a 561 – page study that included 15 out of 17 measures of ecological health that were declining.

Canada proposed solutions such as artificially induced spring floods and other water flows. Ottawa also promised more careful environmental reviews of nearby development and better consultation with local Indigenous People.

Since the report, Alberta has also created a series of wildland areas around most of the park as a buffer zone.

The UN draft states these are good measures including Bill C-69 on environmental assessment.

Parks Canada has committed more than $27.5 million over 5 years to support the federal plan. But UNESCO says more needs to be done due to the size of the park and the complexity of the issues.

At the July 3, 2019 meeting, UNESCO states it will need a full report on the effects of the B.C Hydro’s Site C development on the peace river, as well as an assessment of  risks posed by more than a trillion litres of oil sand’s tailings in upstream ponds. It has given Canada to December 2020 to report on the progress. If it is not satisfactory, UNESCO says the park could end up on the list of World Heritage sites in danger.

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….see you on the trails …

Jane