Executive News

September 24, 2019 CORE Monthly Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for September’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

Norseman Outdoor Specialist

September Presentation by Norseman Outdoor Specialist

Norseman Outdoor Specialist is one of the oldest outdoor stores in Calgary.  They specialize in technical cross-country skiing, hiking and climbing equipment. Established in 1971, their mission then and now has not changed. Norseman has a passion for the adventuring way of life and are dedicated to excellent customer experience’s. They spend time in the community to further their passion and look forward too many more years of helping people enjoy their outdoor adventures. Norseman Outdoor Specialist believe gear should be reliable not disposable. Gear should fit well and they believe in providing exactly what the customer needs, for their outdoor adventure.

Anthony (business owner), of the Norseman Outdoor Specialist will be doing a presentation on Outdoor Clothing, layering and how it affects your comfort and safety. The different types of layers inner, mid and outer layer for different outdoor activities and temperatures.

UPCOMING EVENTS:

CORE Celebrates 20 years:

2008 Hailstone Butte

MARK YOUR CALENDARS – CORE is in the process of organizing “a big bash” to celebrate our 20th Anniversary this coming November.

This will take place on Tuesday November 26

There will be a sumptuous sit down dinner, professional entertainment, quizzes, prizes and a slide show of events over the past 20 years. This promises to be the biggest event ever held by CORE. More details and a sign-up form will be available later. The 20th anniversary celebration will replace the annual Christmas party.

A “memories” photo album has been setup on the CORE photos site (2019 – CORE20ANV) and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2019/20 membership year

CORE is halfway through the year and is planning trips for the remaining 2019/20 fall and winter seasons. If you would like to join any of our events, you must be a CORE member or guest. For more information on how to join CORE, go to the  “Join Now” tab, on the website.

Event Coordinators Guidelines

A reminder to all event coordinators that a Trip Report Form is a requirement for all official CORE events (4+ people including coordinator). This includes hikes, bike trips, snowshoe and ski trips, guided backcountry trips and workshops and training courses that are sponsored by CORE.

New:  Event coordinators may now submit Trip Reports for unofficial (<4 people) events, and social events so they are acknowledged for the event in the database.

All Trip Reports should be provided to the Executive Trip Coordinator   in electronic or in hard copy form. For electronic submission, scanned PDF, or photo of the trip report emailed to mailbox@corehike.org as soon as possible after the event is fine. Event Coordinators Guidelines are posted on the CORE website at corehike.org.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 …………………………………………………………………………………………..

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August and September 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for August 13 to September 14, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

……………………………………………………………………………………

August 13 – Bald Hills Hike Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 13 – Scramble Hawk Mtn Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 14 – Utopia Mtn Scramble Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 14 – Sulphur Mt Hike Jasper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

August 17 – Glenbow Ranch Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

August 18 – West Wind Pass Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.……………………………………………………………………………………………… 

August 21 – Guinn’s Pass Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 25 – Hailstone Butte Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

August 31 – Baldy/Barrier Mtn Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Sept 9 – Rae Glacier via Elbow Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Sept 2 Medicine of the Earth Workshop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Sept 14 Fullerton Loop Memorial Hike & Picnic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

News and Notes

Hiker fined $2000.00 for feeding Timbits to a Bear

A B.C. man posted photos of himself feeding Timbits and hot dogs to bears on social media has been fined $2000 and ordered to stay 50 metres away from bears for six months. The man pleaded guilty last week in a Fort Nelson courtroom to violating the B.C. Wildlife Act, while in the northern part of the province. Conservation officers hope this sends a message and stops people from feeding any wildlife. Conditioning bears to accept food from humans is not only illegal but dangerous for the bears and humans.

Under B.C.’s Wildlife Act it states a person must not intentionally feed or attempt to feed dangerous wildlife.

Hiker Bitten by Bear at Lake Louise

On Friday, August 20th, at approximately 4.45pm a person was hiking on the Lake Agnes trail when they encountered a bear. The person kicked at the bear, causing the bear to nip his ankles and tear his pants. The bear then took off into the woods. Parks Canada stated the hiker was treated for minor injuries after reporting the incident. The black bear was trying to get away from the crowds of people. They could not state if this was the same black bear that was seen swimming across Lake Louise earlier.

Following the encounter Parks Canada issued a bear warning for the trails and day use areas in the Lake Louise area, which is uncommon according to wildlife management specialist Jon Stuart-Smith. He believes these incidents are rare, when you look at the number of visitor’s that come to the parks.

Parks Canada at this point would not change their approach to managing wildlife and how they deal with these types of situations. “But will continue to take every effort they can to make sure people understand the ways that they can make themselves safe and the ways they can help protect wildlife and maintain wildlife in the national parks.” Parks Canada will continue to monitor wildlife activity in the park.

Visitors to the park need to avoid wildlife encounters by taken the following steps:

  • Walk in groups and make noise
  • Keep pets on a leash
  • Keep small children close by
  • Carry bear spray and know how to use it
  • Store food and other animal attractants in vehicles or food lockers
  • Be alert for signs and sounds of wildlife

Need to remember that this is wildlife area and people are infringing on their territory.If you do see a bear or other wildlife in Banff National Park report the sighting to Banff dispatch 403 – 762 – 1473.

Whistler Campground in Jasper National Park closed thru the 2020 season

The original plan was to reopen Whistler Campground for the spring of 2020. Parks Canada states “due to the size and complexity of the project has meant that contracting and work at the sited have required more time than initially expected. Keeping the campground closed for the 2020 season will allow the work to take place in a safe and efficient manner.” Parks Canada is sending this notice out the extension of the closure now,  to provide certainty for visitors, business’s and the tourism industry.

Whistler has 800 of the 1800 campsites in the park. Jasper’s local business have raised concerns that the closure could hurt tourism. In 2019 business has been down due to the campsite closure and the weather.

Jasper National Park is removing Online Bear Warnings

Jasper National Park is concerned about the lengths some visitors are willing to go this summer to get the perfect picture with wildlife. “People that are not familiar with wildlife are following, getting close, chasing and pursuing wildlife into the forest to get a better picture. It is happening all over the park,” states Steve Malcolm, human-wildlife conflict specialist with Parks Canada. With increasing visitors, to the park, harassment of wildlife is on the rise.

  • People feeding wildlife, which is on the rise, which means this could have consequences for the animal.
  • People are staying with an individual animal that’s accessing food on the roadside.
  • They will stop on the roadside and spend the entire day following the animal and taking pictures.

Jasper Park is managing 50 to 100 wildlife jams per day. This is traffic jams that happen when tourists slow or stop their vehicles on busy roads to view an animal.

People were going online to the bear report to see the bears location then go to that location to take pictures, instead of staying away from the area. Jasper Park decided to discontinue its online bear report in an effort to give wildlife space and reduce traffic jams.

Banff National Park Not Removing Online Bear Reports – Yet

Bill Hunt – resource conservation manager with Banff National Park stated “officials are closely monitoring the decision by Jasper officials and are keeping their options open for a similar halt.”

Banff askes the public if they see a bear or other wildlife to report it. They use the sightings as data, for where bears are in the park. This is to affirm the bears are out and active in the park. People need to carry bear spray, be alert and follow the safety precautions that the park has in place for wildlife.

Gregoire Lake Park Closed due to Trees Toppling

Gregoire Lake in northern Alberta near the City of Fort McMurray was badly burned in the 2016 wildfire that destroyed thousands of homes in the Fort McMurray fire. The province stated “wet conditions this summer combined with fire-damaged soils caused the trees to fall even in moderate winds.”

The park was evacuated on August 28, 2019 after gusts of 60 km/hour winds caused more than 20 healthy looking trees to fall across an access road. Another 100 trees were downed elsewhere in the park, which has campsites and a beach.

Alberta Environment and Parks, after the Fort McMurray fire, cleared out dead and damaged trees and left the ones that were in good shape.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outside Magasine has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There are some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There has been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.  

Banff National Park has stated that it is Elk rutting season and Bull Elk become extremely aggressive protecting their harems during the mating season. The season lasts till mid October.

………………………………………………………………………………………

Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking Quote by Earl Shaffer

…For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Edible Mushrooms

While hiking this year I have noticed a lot of mushrooms. These mushrooms range in size from small to large. I and other hikers wonder if these mushrooms are edible.

The quantity of mushrooms is due to the amount of rain the province has received this year. Most parts of Alberta received at least 80 mm of precipitations since June.

The fungi for creating mushrooms is always in the soil. When the temperature, light and nutrient conditions are right, this network of threads(for better words) which creates the conditions to form mushrooms. Moisture increases the pressure inside the threads allowing fungi to push its way up out of the soil. Fungi then reproduce by fragmentation, budding or producing spores under mushroom caps. Mushrooms are really important in getting the nutrients that are locked up in dead wood and plants back into nature so other plants can receive these nutrients. Its like a complete cycle of natural fertilization.

Edible Mushrooms I have seen on my hikes:

Black Morel:

Black Morel Mushroom

– Cap is up to 8cm wide, has a honeycomb surface consisting of black/brown ridges and dark brown pits

 – Bottom of cap does not hang loose but is fused to the stem

 – Cap and stem are hollow, form a single continuous hollow chamber

 – Stem is whitish and smooth

 – Grows singly or in numbers on the ground

 – Appears in early spring

                                                      – Morels can vary in shape, size and colour

Common Puffball:

Common Puffball Mushroom

  •  – Body is up to 6 cm broad, pear shaped, white to dull white, with small spines that break off

– Flesh is firm and all-white

  •  – Flesh cannot show any gills, no thick rind
  •  – Appears in the summer and fall
  •  – Grows singly, in groups or clumped together on forest beds under conifers and hardwoods

 

 

Fairy Ring Mushroom:

Fairy Ring Mushroom

– Cap is up to 6 cm broad, flying-saucer shaped with a central hump

– Cap is smooth, tan to light brown

  •  – Flesh is thin, white

– Gills are broadly attached to the stem, tan, well-spaced

– Stem is solid(not hollow) and tough, too tough to break with fingers

– Grows in grassy areas, meadows and fields, forming rings in the grass, appears in spring, summer or fall

Hedgehog Mushroom:

Hedgehog Mushroom

– Cap is up to 10cm broad, smooth sometimes wavy at the edges, light brown with an orange tint

– Underside has distinctive spines that are cream-coloured

– Flesh is white, slowly and unevenly discolouring to yellow-brown when cut

– Occurs alone or in numbers, growing in association with conifers and hardwoods

– Appears in the summer and fall

Hexagonal-pored Polypore Mushroom:

Hexagonal Mushroom

– Cap is up to 8 cm broad, cream-orange to brownish-red

– Underside is whitish and has large, hexagonal shaped pores each less than one mm wide

– Grows singly or as several on hardwood branches and twigs

– Appears in summer or fall

 

Mica Cap:

Mica Cap

– Cap is cone to bell shaped, up to 6 cm broad, dry, with light brown with furrow lines radiating top to bottom

– Young mushrooms often have glistening particles on the cap

  • Gills are nearly free from the stem and white/grey when young

– Stem is silky white, hollow

– Grows in tight clusters in grass or ground covering wood debris during cool, wet weather

– Appears in spring, summer and fall

Comb Tooth Mushroom:

Comb Tooth Mushroom

– Is white, 10 to 30 cm broad, turning yellowish with age

  •  – Branches arise from a thick stalk that is attached to wood

– Branches have short, white spines along their lengths

– Appears in late summer and fall

– Grows on conifers and hardwoods

 

Remember these may be edible, but you need to be 110% positive you have the right mushroom before picking and/or eating. If you pick a mushroom always wear gloves. You do not know if the stem and/or the cap could be poisonous. Remember there are many poisonous mushrooms out there as well.

Leave picking and eating mushrooms to the Experts

 

       TAKE CARE, AND HAVE FUN!!!!!!