Advisories

July 2020 CORE Newsletter

July 2020 CORE Newsletter

Executive News

 

 CORE HAS RE-STARTED CLUB ACTIVITIES/EVENTS

Thank you for your patience over the past two months, while the club adhered to government guidelines, and cancelled all activities and meetings. Now that the Alberta government has re-opened the provincial parks and has announced that groups of up to 50 people can gather in the outdoors (while maintaining such practices as social distancing), CORE can slowly begin to re-start the club. CORE executive has worked on guidelines and recommendations for trip coordinators, for the June 15th, phased-in-start-up of events.

Since June 15th, CORE has put on many activities/events. Have a look at the Activity Scoreboard below. Many more activities/events are planned, for the coming months.

Members are encouraged to read the Guidelines “Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19 pandemic.”

With the June 15th phase in date, to restart the club activities,  if there are any complications, or the province of Alberta mandates different requirements, the organization may have to make appropriate changes.  If the situation changes a newsletter with the updated information will be sent to the members..

Renewal of CORE Membership for 2020/2021 membership year is now Open.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, CORE could not start the 2020/2021 membership renewal until May 26, 2020.  All current memberships which normally expires at the end of May is now extended to the end of June 2020, with the existing Event Calendar password remaining the same. The 2020/2021 membership applications are now open, for members and new members to join. You can signup by the “Join Now” page on the CORE website at https://corehike. org/

Message from CORE’s Executive Trip Coordinator

Wildflowers, snow-free trails, and nature blossoming in all its splendour! Time to enjoy the outdoors! CORE’s phased-in relaunch of its outdoor activities begins June 15.

Looking for ideas for trips and events this summer to post on CORE’s calendar? Why not consider the following suggestions (some more conventional than others): hikes, scrambles, biking adventures, urban walks, outdoor photography outings, wildflower explorations, wildlife spotting, bird watching, canoeing/kayaking on the reservoir, touring your own neighbourhood, outdoor scavenger hunts, star gazing and moonlight walks. (Told you that some would be unconventional! LOL).

Please contact CORE’s Executive Trip Coordinator, Carol, if you are interested in being “mentored” this summer and fall. With the help of an experienced coordinator, you could learn: how to post an event on the CORE Calendar and send it out by email; how to fill in a Trip Report; and how to safely run a trip or event. As a first step, Carol can email you some useful information on coordinating. Contact info: mailbox@corehike.org

A Coordinators’ mentoring hike, led by Mike, was supposed to have occurred in April. This hike is on-hold due to COVID-19 restrictions. Another mentoring hike for urban hikes was also being considered. Stay tuned for future news on this topic, and a potential trip planning meeting, which may have to be done virtually.

Reminder, No July and August 2020 Monthly Member Meeting

In 2019 CORE Executive put forth a motion to CORE membership, starting in 2019 there will be no monthly membership meetings for July and August. This motion was passed by the CORE membership.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of different purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If  you have a general question’s about the club, for instance upcoming presenters planned, event, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

Highlights of Activities/Events

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar of hikes and bike rides from June 19 to July 19, 2020.  Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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June 19 2020 Wildwood Westgate Area Bike Ride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 22 2020 Barrier Lake Forestry Trail/Lusk Creek Loop Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 25 2020 Canmore/Banff Legacy Trail Bike Ride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 1 2020 Ralph Klein Park/Rotary Mattamy SE Bike Ride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 1 2020 Riverside Loop Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 9 2020 Cox Hill Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 10 2020 Foran Grade Sheep River Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 11 2020 Nose Hill Park Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 19 2020 Dyson Falls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News and Notes

Remember It is Tick Season:

Male and Female Tick

Tick season is here. Tuck your pant legs into your socks and check yourself and your pet for ticks after leaving a grassy or wooded area where ticks may live. Wear light coloured clothing and cover up as much skin as possible. E.G. wear a hat, long-sleeve shirt, pants.

If you notice a round red rash that spreads at the site of  a bite. Have flu-like symptoms(tiredness, headaches, sore muscles and joints, fever) you should seek medical attention.

For more information go to my article on Ticks in the April 2019 newsletter.

 

 

Parks Canada to Open Some National Parks, Historic Sites Across Canada

Effective June 1, 2020 Parks Canada will begin to offer limited access and services. While Maintaining physical distancing measures. Openings will differ across Canada. Information will be updated regular on Parks Canada website.  Until then closure is still in effect. Your annual pass will be credited for the number of months the national parks have been closed. The two week park closure in March counts as a full month.

Bus Shuttles suspended to Lake O’Hara, Lake Louise and Moraine Lake

Lake O’Hara, Yoho National Park

Shuttle services to Lake Louise, Moraine Lake and Lake O’Hara have been suspended for the 2020 season. Parks Canada cited physical distancing regulations for cancelling the shuttles.

The shuttle service to Lake O’Hara requires a reservation and all existing bookings will be refunded in full including reservation fee. As the shuttle is cancelled campers can still access campgrounds and surrounding trails on foot. Biking is not permitted on the access road. Any camper wanting to cancel their Lake O’Hara campground reservation will be refunded with no cancellation fees.

Parks is reminding hikers it is 11 km and 450 metre elevation gain from parking lot to Lake O’Hara along the access road. You must be able to return on your own. Parks Canada has limited resources for rescuing hikers.

Alberta Parks and Parks Canada has asked the public for your cooperation to choose outdoor activities that are low risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. As any emergency assistance during this time period puts additional strain on the health care system, put public safety staff at risk, including exposure to COVID-19, which then can impact resources to support search and rescue.

 

Nakoda – Banff’s White Grizzly Bear and Sibling

Parks Canada has put in a NO Stopping Zone to protect the White Grizzly – As of July 22 2020 this restriction is still in effect

Nakoda, the rare white Grizzly Bear that has been spotted in Banff National Park, has created a traffic jam on Hwy #1, as visitors want to get a photo of this white grizzly bear. National Parks effective June 19, 2020 has put in a 10 km NO stopping zone in place between Sherbrook Creek, near the Alberta/BC border and Field, BC. This restriction is to keep all bears and visitors safe. The no stopping zone will remain in effect until the bears move away as food sources in the upper elevations become more plentiful.

The Spiral Tunnels day use area and parking lot remain open. Anyone who violates this order will be subject to a fine, from $115 ticket to a mandatory court appearance and maximum fine of $25,000.

Guidelines to how the Alberta government plans to sale Provincial Parks

Alberta Environment and Parks were to release the guidelines on How the parks “partnership” would work, on May 4, 2020. Due to COVID-19 pandemic this announcement has been delayed. If these parks get delisted, they lose their protection under the Parks legislation and represent the potential loss of public campsites and land across the province.

Alberta Government opens 17 of the 20 Parks that were slated for closure the beginning of this Summer

According to Alberta Parks COVID-19 response page the 17 parks that were slated for closure will be temporarily operating this camping season (2020).

Per CPAWS (Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society), this is an important step that shows that the voices of Albertans, saying how much they value Alberta Parks has changed the minds of the provincial government. These sites need to be available to Albertans not just this summer but also in the future. Parks are important for people’s health and well-being and for supporting local economies, not just during the COVID-19 pandemic. CPAWS is urging the government to reverse these changes permanently.

CPAWS stated  “That they have never had so many people reach out about a single issue. Albertans have shown that parks are vital to quality of life and wellbeing. All Albertans must continue to voice their concern over these changes, so the parks remain open beyond the summer of 2020 and the other 164 parks are not privatized and remain protected and public”.

Parks that will not be opening are the popular Barrier Lake Visitor Centre, Elbow Valley Visitor Centre and Dinosaur Provincial Park – Comfort Camping sites remain closed. The visitor centres provided important trail safety information to those setting off into the mountains, an introduction to responsible use of our provincial parks for tourists and important wildlife safety tips. Albertans need to help to get these centres back.

 Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaeology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall.

Visit Friends of Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Kananaskis Park Event Series:

For more information go to Friends of Kananaskis Park event calendar.

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Link

Alberta Parks and Banff National Park are urging people to be bear aware. There have been multiple sightings of bears, and other wildlife in the parks. Depending on which park you are in, contact either Alberta Parks (403-591-7755) or Parks Canada Banff office (403-762-1470) if you come in close vicinity of a bear, cougar, elk or wolf.

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Members Corner

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

 

Hiking quote by Henry David Thoreau

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

 

 

 

 

 “Hiking with CORE in the Time of COVID-19 pandemic”

CORE’s COVID-19 Guidelines

Keeping Members Safe on Events

 

  • Do NOT sign-up if you are experiencing any illness or COVID-19 symptoms
  • Avoid Non-Family carpooling. Meet at trailheads or a designated place for convoying.
  • Maintain physical distancing at all times. 2 metres/6 feet
  • Bring a mask for emergency use.
  • Bring your own supply of wipes/hand sanitizer/gloves/toilet paper, as necessary and your first aid kit – No sharing.
  • Do Not share food or drinks.
  • Washrooms may not always be available, be prepared.
  • Bring enough food, water, proper clothing/shoes, equipment and bear spray. No stopping prior to trailhead, or heading back.
  • Be aware of risks in participating and agree to accept these risks.
  • Remember to provide a cell phone number and emergency contact number to the coordinator when signing up.
  • No Trip Reports will be signed by members for the time being but coordinators are still required to submit a Trip Report.

NOTE: Events may be changed or cancelled at short notice due to changes in government guidelines. The requirements above may change accordingly with updated government regulations.

 

 

        Take Care, Be Safe And Have Fun!!!!  

By |Advisories|Comments Off on July 2020 CORE Newsletter

May 2019 CORE Newsletter

 

CORE’s Annual General Meeting and Social – Tuesday, May 28 at 7:00pm

At the upcoming AGM, CORE members will elect their new Executive committee for the 2019/20 membership year. In addition to the elections, the presentation will show achievements, financial statements, trip coordinators (with awards), the Chicken Mountain Award (with stories) and door prizes, after which will be a slide show of events from the past year, food, drinks, music and fun.

If you would like to nominate a member for the executive or would like more information please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Renewal of Membership for 2019/20 membership year

It is now time to renew your membership for the next membership year. This can be done online using a credit/debit card. However, if you wish to renew by cash or cheque at the AGM, please complete the Membership Form online BEFOREHAND, indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to bring a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email), signed by you, to the AGM, along with your payment. HANDWRITTEN MEMBERSHIP FORMS CANNOT BE ACCEPTED.

Members and Guests please join us for May’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

 

Harvey with his beloved chicken

May 27 – Deadline – For Chicken Mountain Award

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have to May 27 to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org . At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee will be chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of the trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

 

 

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

 

Preparing a thermal wrap

Wilderness First Aid Course 

Wilderness First Aid Course was attended by 12 CORE members. The course opened up many discussions on how prepared you are prior to the meetup of the event. What is needed for an incident while on a event. The course also, covered the ABC’s of first aid as well many different ways to treat an incident while on the event. Key item to remember is when you are out in the mountains, cell phones may not work, who is aware of your arrival time back home, and how prepared you are  in case you have an emergency in the mountains?

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 
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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

April  and May 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 23 to April 22, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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April 19 Elbow Valley Sulphur Springs Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 21 Nose Hill Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 22 Tennis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 27 Wilderness First Aid Course

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 11 Friendship Trail Turner Valley Black Diamond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Destination Moraine Lake, Banff National Park?!!!!

As we are aware, unless you arrive at Moraine Lake Road by 8 am in the morning, your access may not be allowed. Vehicles are only permitted on the Moraine Lake road when parking is available at Moraine Lake. Parking fills up quickly. Travel to the lake is restricted once the parking lots are full.

A daily shuttle is available from May 24 to October 14, 2019, from the Lake Louise lakeshore to Moraine Lake. Shuttles leaving Moraine Lake will return to the Lake Louise  Park and Ride. Moraine Lake road is open from mid-May to mid-October and closed in the winter. Tickets can be purchased at the Lake Louise lakeshore for scheduled departures.

Fares:

  • Adult: $6
  • Senior (over 65): $3
  • Youth (under 18): $3
  • Child (under 6): Free

Schedule:

  • Shuttles leave from the Lake Louise lakeshore every 20 minutes from 8:40 am to 4:20 pm headed to Moraine Lake.
  • Last shuttle to the Lake Louise Park and Ride leaves at 5:40 pm.
  • Daily between May 24 to October 14

Early Bird Shuttle to Moraine Lake

New for 2019 Parks Canada will offer morning shuttles to Moraine Lake for visitors wanting to get an early start to the day. Space is limited so arrive early. Tickets for the Early Bird Shuttle are available at the Lake Louise Park and Ride.

Fares:

  • Adult:$8
  • Senior (over 65): $4
  • Youth (under 18): $4
  • Child (under 6): Free

Schedule:

  • Starting at 6 am, four departures from the Lake Louise Park and Ride are available until 7.30 am.
  • Return shuttles from Moraine Lake to the Lake Louise Park and Ride will be available from 9 am to 5:40 pm daily

The Moraine Lake shuttled does not stop at the Paradise Valley trailhead. You need to arrive prior to 8 am to secure parking to this trailhead.

For more information go to Parks Canada Moraine Lake.

Lake Louise Ski Area Planning to Give Parks Canada 1000 hectares in exchange to upgrade their current space on the Mountain

After years of negotiating, Parks Canada and Lake Louise Ski Resort have come up with a long range plan.  Dan Markham from Lake Louise Ski Resort stated the listed changes would be done within the resort’s existing footprint. Lake Louise’s leasehold is going to be reduced by almost 50 per cent. As they will be giving back about 1,000 hectares of undeveloped land that was part of their original leasehold. They are giving this land back to Parks Canada for protection “from now until the end of time” in exchange for being able to do upgrades and developments.

What is currently proposed in the Long-Range Plan:

  • Construction of water reservoirs at the Old Gondola Base adjacent to the Pipestone River near Corral Creek in the Temple area
  • Expansion of Temple Lodge
  • New Lifts and Ski terrain on Richardson’s Ridge
  • New mountain top lodge on Eagle Ridge
  • New day lodge in the base area
  • New lifts and ski terrain on the front side of Whitehorn Mountain
  • New warming hut near the upper terminal of Top-of-the-World lift
  • Development of access and egress routes in West Bowl
  • Redevelopment of parking areas at the base

Lake Louise Ski Resort will close summer operations at its mid-mountain lodge, to move completely out of the grizzly bear corridor for the summer. This plan will give Parks Canada major gains in conservation, visitor experience and education. The next step is a 60-day public consultation on the long-range plan which concluded with open houses in April 2019. Public comment closes June 15, 2019. At the conclusion of the consultations, Parks Canada will provide direction to Lake Louise Ski Resort for any necessary changes or additions to the detailed impact assessment or long-range plan based on public input. No decisions have been made at this time. Canada’s Environment minister will have final approval. Lake Louise Ski Resort hopes to start the new proposals by next spring (2020). For more information go to Parks Canada. 

UCP Cancels Bighorn Country Parks Proposal

Last November, NDP government announced eight new parks covering 4,000 square kilometers in what is known as Bighorn Country along the eastern edges of Banff and Jasper National Parks.

Alberta’s new Environment Minister Jason Nixon states the UCP government will not go ahead with the proposal. UCP state the consultation process was flawed and there was some questions and concerns that residents, municipal officials had raised requiring how the proposal might affect oil and gas exploration, the forest industry and off-road vehicle use.

The NDP’s plan called for a variety of permitted activities and provided $40 million over five years for campsites and other infrastructure. Off-highway vehicles, horse packing and hunting would have continued with new restrictions. Grazing leases would have remained and no existing trail closures. This proposal would have protected the headwaters of the North Saskatchewan River, which provides drinking water to people in central and northern Alberta (including Edmonton).

The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society is concerned about the cancelation of the proposal. They state the Bighorn Country area needs to be protected due to its important area for drinking water  and for the different species of wildlife and plants. CPWS hopes the UCP will do a review of the previous work and incorporate it into a new plan.

Nixon wants to see both an economic and environmental assessment of the proposal to better understand the challenges this proposal provides. And a better consultation process for all parties that are affected.

Spilled Grain from February Train Derailment still not cleaned up in Banff Park

The closure of the Bow Valley Parkway was set to end on April 1, but this deadline has now been extended to July 31, 2019. The parkway maybe open sooner depending on the cleanup. For updates go to Parks Canada Banff Bulletins.

Be ALERT for Bear Activity in this area.

Alert has been issued for Canmore, Redwood and Bragg Creek due to Grizzly, Black Bears and Cougars roaming these areas.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Opening of Highways into Provincial Parks starts May 14 including the Sheep River Road, Highway #546. For information for other highway openings in the Kananaskis Park area go to Alberta Parks road closure bulletin.  

 

Trail Closures and Trail Report Links

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Dr Seuss hiking quote

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

 Canada Warming up Twice as fast as the rest of the world and it is Irreversible

A new Scientific report by Environment and Climate Change Canada states “Canada is warming up twice as fast as the rest of world and that warming is irreversible.” Warming is happening even faster in winter, leaving southern Canadians with more winter rainfall and northern Canadians with melting permafrost and less sea ice. The Artic is hit the hardest, as it is warming three times as fast as the rest of the world. By the middle of this century it would leave most marine regions in the Canadian North ice-free for at least a month at a time.

If nothing is done to reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions building in the atmosphere Canadians will end up with 10 times as many deadly heat waves, which will create more wildfires and twice as many extreme rainstorms. As well as a steady rise in coastal waters, which will determine how long people will be able to live in coastal communities.

2018 was one of the warmest years on record:

The surface temperature in 2018 was the 4th warmest year on record over the past 140 years since records have been kept. Per NASA and NOAA scientists there has been up and down spikes in temperatures over the last decades. But the rise in temperatures suddenly has been correlated to the rise in greenhouse gas emissions. This continuing sudden increase of warming, is causing steep challenges for governments to reverse the man-made effects. The Paris agreement had set out 1.5 Celsius degree temperature change but this could be exceeded between 2020 and 2023. Much sooner than expected, by the Paris Agreement of 2030. The climate scientists have predicated the extreme climate swings and this winter’s polar vortex.

The last four years have been the warmest:

  • 2018 4th warmest
  • 2017 2nd warmest
  • 2016the warmest
  • 2015 3rd warmest

Note: At the Paris agreement Canada agreed to lower it greenhouse gas emissions to 30% by 2030. From 2005 to 2017 actual reduction is 2%.

Parks Canada has started many new projects in protecting ecosystems and wildlife due to climate change. They are doing studies on climate change in different areas of Canada.

Listed below 3 climate change studies by Parks Canada:

  1. Study the capacity of eelgrass and salt marshes to absorb carbon (study is being done on the west coast)
  2. Finding the carbon balance – ecosystems absorb carbon dioxide through trees, soil, mosses and phytoplankton and they release the gas through decomposition and fires. Gathering information using forest inventory (type of forest) and information on wildfires, insect infestations and prescribed fires. To determine which park releases more carbon than it stores, or vice versa. This will help to understand the living landscape of carbon and how it has changed in the last 28 years.
  3. Climate Change Assessment in Norther National Parks – One of the goals is to consider the possible impacts of climate change on northern wildlife. The report to date has shown that the lemming and polar bear were extremely vulnerable to climate change.  If this wildlife is affected so will its predators – e.g. arctic and red fox. This becomes a dominion affect, not just on wildlife but on the entire ecosystem.

For more information on Parks Canada climate change studies visit their website.

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….see you on the trails …

Jane

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Canoeing the Land of the Voyageurs

 

McLennan Lake ~ 500 Km North of Saskatoon

McLennan Lake ~ 500 Km North of Saskatoon

Cathie Newsome and John Hitt, long time CORE members, spent 5 days canoe camping in the McLennan Lake area of Northern Saskatchewan in the fall of 2015. Here they recount their experiences on that adventure.

Soft is the Song my Paddle Sings

Soft is the Song my Paddle Sings

If you like to paddle to experience true serenity and remoteness, have you ever considered Northern Saskatchewan? We’re talking north of La Ronge where the highway becomes a dirt road, and transportation is often by float plane.

We decided on the McLennan Lake area. To get there, you take the Louis Riel trail 380 Km north to La Ronge from Saskatoon. After that, you drive for 2 hours up the highway, (which has now become a dirt road), to McLennan Lake. If you reach Reindeer Lake, you’ve missed it.

As you go north the trees are all evergreens and they get smaller and smaller, and scrawnier and scrawnier. This area is part of the Canadian Shield so it’s pretty rocky, and a thick green spongy moss grows all over the place. There is more water than land up here, making the number of canoe routes endless. You can go for 4 days or a month.

There is a hotel in La Ronge, and you might want to check out the trading post in town where they sell things like dog sleds, and beautiful embroidered buckskin jackets made by the First Nations people that live in the area. They still trade furs brought in by local trappers. Wild rice harvested in the area’s lakes is available in town.

Making Camp

Making Camp

You can park at a small compound at McLennan Lake where they sell the only map of the area that has the campsites on it. This isn’t a park, it’s just wilderness, so campsites are not marked, nor are portages. There is no outhouse, or pic-nic table, or place to hang your food away from the bears.

You need to be prepared for anything the wilderness might have in store for you, including bugs, animals, rain, and blistering sun from being on the water all day. Bring a bug helmet, and plan to go later in the season unless you want to get eaten alive by the bugs. Mosquitoes are extra large here and many other flying creatures abound.

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Beaver Lodge

Beaver Lodge

You can camp anywhere you want. We discovered that it’s just easier if someone was there before you and cleared a spot for your tent. Most campsites are on islands or on a spit of land where there is a breeze to keep the bugs away. The sites probably were used by the First Nations people, and fur traders who trapped the beaver in the area.

There are beaver lodges everywhere. Muskrats will also take advantage of the free room and board, and occasional visitors such as otters, ducks and turtles will also share the beaver’s lodge. (Beavers build and maintain houses called lodges. There are two main types, the conical lodge and the bank lodge. The most recognized type is the conical shaped dwelling surrounded by water. It is made from sticks, mud and rocks for protection from predators. )

Portage

Portage

Portages are interesting and can be marked by an empty bag of chips hanging on a tree if you’re lucky, but mostly you just have to look hard to find them. Forget about the wide portages you might find in some government parks. Some portages were quite muddy, and once we walked on rocks down a small stream to the next lake.

(Anyone who says they like portaging is either a liar or crazy.)

Despite being pretty far north we were able to swim in August. We didn’t come across any sandy beaches, although we saw some on the way back on Lac La Ronge.

 

Lull for a Little Fishing

Lull for a Little Fishing

You can swim off the rocks at most campsites or just slide into the water from your canoe.

There are a few fishermen that you might bump into occasionally, and we saw lots of loons. The fishing is good for pickerel and pike.

Sunsets are awesome.

If you register for your trip in La Ronge, you could get rescued if you don’t show up on your scheduled return date, and you can collect your official Voyageur certificate when you come back.

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Les Voyageurs

Les Voyageurs

If you use your imagination, you can just see through the mist those hardy fur traders singing les chansons des voyageurs as they paddle across the lakes.

M’en revenant de la jolie Rochelle;

J’ai rencontré trois jolies demoiselles.

J’ai point choisi, mai j’ai pris la plus belle

J’l’y fis monter derrièr’ moi, sur ma selle...

 

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CORE December 2015 Newsletter

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November is the “shoulder season” between fall hiking and the commencement of Winter activities. Nonetheless we had 9 hiking and snowshoe events on our calendar, as well as a “social dining” event, our annual Christmas party and the Castle Junction Chalet weekend events in early December.

Some Highlights

Hike Brown-Lowery Provincial Park

Hike Brown-Lowery Provincial Park

Backcountry Ski Pocaterra Cirque

Backcountry Ski Pocaterra Cirque

Hot Drinks and a Fire in North Glenmore Park

Hot Drinks in North Glenmore Park

Snow Crystals - Highwood Pass

Snow Crystals – Highwood Pass

Castle Mountain Chalets Weekend

Castle Mountain Chalets Weekend

Boom Lake Snowshoe Trail

Boom Lake Snowshoe Trail

 

November Club Meeting

Last month’s club meeting was held on Tueday November 24 at the Scarboro Community Centre. This was our annual Christmas party, well attended, a good time had by all. Presenter Andy Gamp gave an informative and exciting slide show on the sport of paragliding.

December Club Meeting

There is no club meeting in December. See you in January.

January Club Meeting

Tuesday January 26, 2016 – 7 p.m.

Join us at the Scarboro Community Hall, 1727 – 14 Ave SW. The presentation for the evening will be:

South American Adventures

CORE members Geoff and Lynn will be presenting on their amazing trip to South America.

SAFETY

We are now into Avalanche Season. Evaluate the risks before heading into the back country. You can find current conditions on the Parks Canada Mountain Safety website.

PLANNED EXCURSIONS

Assiniboine Lodge

Mar 6 – 9, 2016

We are starting to make plans for a weekend at Assiniboine Lodge. We will be taking a helicopter to Assiniboine Lodge March 6, returning March 9. During the stay we will be able to backcountry ski or snowshoe. The lodge provides guides and avalanche gear (transceivers, probes, and shovels).

Anyone interested, please check the CORE calendar for further details.

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Our Club

Article written by CORE member Carol Miyagawa which appeared in the AHA Winter Newsletter.

CORE, which celebrated its 16th anniversary in November, is a hiking club… and more. When members browse through the activity calendar for the Calgary Outdoor Recreation Enthusiasts, they find mostly hikes, snowshoe trips and x-c ski trips, but they also find some unusual outings. Take the club’s fall 2015 schedule, for example. Besides the 15-20 hikes posted on the calendar, members were able to choose from the following activities:

  • Two cycling trips – one featured the fall colours in K-Country at their peak
  • Eight urban walks — where members could enjoy beautiful sunsets and evening twilight
  • A Labour Day weekend backpack trip to “Little Yoho”
  • A chance to hike through the tunnel at Crypt Lake in Waterton National Park
  • A Thanksgiving hiking weekend at Ribbon Creek Hostel
  • Two educational presentations at the Scarboro Community Hall, including one by David Peyto who is attempting to walk every street in Calgary
  • An early winter snowshoe trip to test out the snowshoes and winter gear
  • A backcountry ski day
  • A shopping discount night at MEC

When winter arrives, CORE members can look forward to many snowshoe trips in K-Country and the National Parks, as well as a few winter hikes. In December 2015, CORE members stayed at the Castle Mountain Chalets for a weekend of snowshoeing and cross country skiing… just another example of how members are always coming up with a “new twist” on basic activities.

CORE Featured in the Alberta Hiking Association Newsletter

CORE is highlighted in the AHA Winter 2016 newsletter as the “Featured Club.” If you scroll down to the end of the newsletter, you’ll see the article we submitted about CORE “Crypt Lake hike” By David van den Eikhof.

New CORE Maps Page

We’ve added a new CORE Resources page to store trail maps that may be useful to club members planning trips. It contains links to just a few maps so far, but we’ll add to it as the need arises. If you are planning an outing, and would like a map posted for the benefit of the people joining you, or simply as a resource, please drop a note to the club Webmaster.

Ask your Exec

If CORE members have any questions about club policies or procedures, just email us at mailbox@corehike.org and a member of the Executive will respond. If the question is of general interest, we’ll include it with the answer in the next newsletter.

Q&A’s

HIKING STORIES

This month we’d like to initiate a Hiking Stories section to spice up our Newsletter a bit. If any of you members have an interesting story to relate about one of your outings, and you would like it to appear in the CORE Blog (newsletter), kindly send it in MS word format along with a PIC or so to the CORE Communications Coordinator (or to mailbox@corehike.org). We’ll likely edit it a bit (we have some skilled proof readers on the CORE Exec), and will include it in one of the upcoming newsletters.

The first submission is about a trip in the summer to Crypt Lake, written by David V., and originally appearing in the AHA Winter Newsletter.

Crypt Lake Hike

By David van den Eikhof

Reprinted from the AHA Winter Newsletter

Crypt lake Hike

While there’s no shortage of great hikes closer to town, every now and then I’d suggest taking the three hour drive down to Waterton Lakes.

A group of seven from CORE, the Calgary Outdoor Recreation Enthusiasts club, met there in the morning at the boat dock (most after a windy night in the main campground). The boat dock? Yes, you have to start with a ferry ride across Waterton Lake to take the classic Crypt Lake hike. The trail rises from a sheltered landing up Hell-Roaring Canyon.

Okay, so the canyon and its falls weren’t roaring that morning, it being late September and the creek fall-quiet, but the wind provided a substitute roar. Back on the boat, white capped waves crashed on the boat bow and windows, and then along the trail Burnt Rock Falls were blown into full reverse more often than not. We were blown about too, invigorating us once we were out of the lower forests.

Well, the unique thing about the hike is the fifteen metre long cave-tunnel you have to traverse on hands and knees, trying to find space for your pack—in pitch dark if your companions are just in front of you. Emerging, you’ve made it through the sheer rock wall into the Crypt hanging valley?

Crypt Lake Cavern Access

Nope. You’re still on the cliffs and have a bit of via ferrata cabled scrambling to do to get around a precipitous corner. It’s really not bad, but one member of another group needed an extra two or three hands to steady her. Next, on a mid-cliff bench you find the lake outflow emerging from a gap in one cliff for a short trip through lush forest before a plunge over the next ledge. Nestled just above, Crypt Cirque itself was—I won’t say calm—but calmer.

We could have spent an hour walking around the fair-sized lake, just barely traversing US territory protected only by the steep cliffs, but we opted for a more leisurely lunch and watched some goats on the mountainside high above the lake. Back to a rendezvous with the boat, completing the 17 km round-trip. We didn’t have to hurry to get there, but we definitely didn’t want to be stranded, right? Be there at 5:30, or else. Hmm. Now what were we to do at 6:00 when there was still no boat in sight? Someone had a cell phone and the boat company’s number and reception! With the high winds, they had to use our craft to also run the main tour cruise to Goat Haunt down the lake. They showed up half loaded from that direction about an hour late. At that point we were just grateful not to be stranded when some of us had to find space on the back or upper deck—open to further wind spray exposure.

Now then, let me tell you about some of the really memorable hikes we did this summer…

MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYBODY

christmas-poem-01

 

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CORE November 2015 Newsletter

OCTOBER ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

Despite the darkening weather and the approach of winter, October saw a number of exciting club outings, as well as a cozy lodge weekend. There were 11 events posted on the calendar, including urban walks, scrambles and hikes of various levels of difficulty, a Hostel weekend at Ribbon Creek, dinner and movie outings, and a Club Members night at MEC.

Some Highlights

Roughing it at Kananaskis Hostel Roughing it at Ribbon Creek Hostel

Memorial Lakes Scrambly Trail

Memorial Lakes Scrambly Trail

Relaxing Above Memorial Lakes Relaxing Above Memorial Lakes

Wasootch Ridge ViewView from Wasootch Ridge

Porcupine Ridge Porcupine Ridge

Porcupine Ridge Pinnacle Porcupine Ridge – End of trail

Forest Management Trail HutThe Colonel’s Cabin *

Baldy Pass TrailBaldy Pass Trail

Lillian Lake Hike - New Galatea BridgeLillian Lake Hike – New Galatea Bridge

Garrison Woods Halloween WalkHalloween Walk Garrison Woods

* The log shelter is the Colonel’s Cabin.  It was the headquarters for the Colonel of the World War II POW camp that was located across from Barrier Lake. We started at the Colonel’s cabin and did part of an interpretive trail, and then headed down Baldy Pass Trail and came back via Lusk Pass Trail.

Club Night at MEC

The MEC club night held on October 9 was a great success. There were 17 members who came out for this event. MEC’s staff presented an enthusiastic and educational walking tour of the store, illustrating how to shop for proper clothing for weather and layering. We also learned how to activate Gortex material to make it more waterproof, and how to dry down-feathered jackets using tennis balls to prevent clumping.

October Club Meeting

Last month’s club meeting was held on Tue October 27 at the Scarboro Community Centre. The presenter was Chris Wright, a long time club member who specializes in nature photography. He gave a photo presentation about exploring the Cariboo and Chilcotin areas of British Columbia.

CORE NOVEMBER CLUB MEETING

Tues. November 24 – 7 p.m.

Join us at our new home in the Scarboro Community Hall, 1727 – 14 Ave SW. The theme for the evening will be:

THE CHRISTMAS PARTY

Join us for the annual CORE club members Christmas party. The evening will also feature a presentation on paragliding by Andy Gamp. He will present the concept of paragliding, its history and evolution, description of the equipment and materials, and philosophy. We will then have time to socialize and talk about our adventures from the year. Food and beverages will be provided.

If only Icarus had these:

Canyon Paragliding

Canyon Paragliding

Hang Gliding

Hang Gliding

SAFETY

WildSmart bear activity

Bear Activity

Bear Activity Reports have ended for the season and will resume in the spring, around May/June, depending on the level of bear activity.

Safety Best Practices

Hike leaders, please be reminded to state our safety guidelines at the beginning of a hike or at the trail head, before you set of on the trail. These include practices such as keeping in groups of at least four people, stopping at junctions in the trail until you rejoin the main group, and having a leader and a sweep to make sure nobody gets lost. Coordinators are encouraged to have a read through the Coordinator’s Guidelines. This document constitutes the collective wisdom of our club on how to keep your group safe while hiking in the mountains. It is accessible at this link, CORE member password required:

https://corehike.org/wp-content/uploads/Forms/EventCoordinatorsGuidelines.pdf

PLANNED EXCURSIONS

Weekend at the Castle Junction Chalets

Friday, December 4 2015 – Sunday, December 6 2015

There will be opportunities for snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, downhill skiing and backcountry skiing.

We have four cabins that each sleep six people, so 24 spots are available. Each cabin has two bedrooms, a pull-out bed, gas fireplace and DVD player. The resort has an activity center, Osprey Lodge, with a hot tub, general store and free Wifi.

There are still a few spots available. If you are interested please check the CORE calendar for contact details.

Assiniboine Lodge

Mar 6 – 9,  2016

We are starting to make plans for a weekend at Assiniboine Lodge. We will be taking a helicopter to Assiniboine Lodge March 6, returning March 9. During the stay we will be able to backcountry ski or snowshoe. The lodge provides guides and avalanche gear (transceivers, probes, and shovels).

Anyone interested, please check the CORE calendar for further details.

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Promoting Our Club

Seeking new members. Must be able to walk, with a desire to improve your fitness and enjoy the outdoors. We are looking to promote the club by putting pamphlets out, and hoping that members will have some suggestions of where we can place a few or better yet deliver some. If you have access to an area or bulletin board that might be frequented by outdoorsy people, please ask a member of the CORE Executive for some pamphlets to place in that location.

Membership Card Laminating

Want to get your membership card laminated? Come to a Club meeting (last Tuesday of every month except December).

Ask your Exec

If CORE members have any questions about club policies or procedures, just email us at mailbox@corehike.org and a member of the Executive will respond. If the question is of general interest, we’ll include it with the answer in the next newsletter.

Q&A’s

Q. Do we publish a list of hikes and other activities planned for the year?

A. No. Our activities are planned and posted by experienced club members who have some leadership coaching from the Club Executive Trip Coordinator. Some activities where reservations are required are put in the Calendar a month or so in advance, but others may be posted only a day or so before hand. All members are urged to check the Calendar often to see if an activity has been inserted that they may be interested in. They then register with the Trip Coordinator so further communications about the activity can take place. This also allows the Trip Coordinator to guage whether the participant has the skills, equipment and stamina to undertake the outing.

Q. What are the prerequisites for leading an outing?

A. The prospective hike (snowshoe, bicycle trip etc) leader should have participated in a few club outings to see “how we do things”, have an interview with the CORE Executive Trip Coordinator, and act as co-lead on at least one trip with one of the club’s experienced activity leaders. Any club member wishing to lead some activities should come out to one of the monthly club meetings and talk to members of the executive. You can also contact the Executive Trip Coordinator directly.

INSPIRATIONAL THOUGHTS

Our monthly quote from outdoor adventurer writers.

Ben Gadd knows the Canadian Rocky Mountains well. He is the author of ten books on the area. His best-selling Handbook of the Canadian Rockies is an award-winning guide to everything from geology, botany and bears to human history and backpacking trips. With a degree in Earth science and nearly 40 years of teaching and writing about the Rockies, Ben is an acknowledged authority on the region.

The following is an excerpt from a lecture by Ben Gadd –Six Good Reasons to Save the Wilderness.The complete text can be found at this link:

http://www.bengadd.com/Downloads/Six%20Good%20Reasons%20to%20Save%20the%20Wilderness%202009.pdf

Now there may be people in this room who wouldn’t mind seeing every grizzly bear in the Rockies decline as far and as fast as possible, but take it from me, who has had many close encounters with bears, that these animals are not bloodthirsty killers. I very nearly walked on a bear once; it got up, highly insulted, and looked at me incredulously until I delivered a proper apology.

Grizzly bears kill people only when we do something really gauche, like threatening their babies or trying to steal their elk kills. Okay; most of us wouldn’t knowingly threaten grizzly-bear babies, and we’re not really interested in rotting elk carcasses, but the bears just automatically assume the worst of us—which, when you stop to think of it, is quite justified. After all, we shoot bears. We hit them with our cars and trucks and trains. We trap them in nasty ways to get their furry skins. We lock them up in zoos, etc., etc.

Considering how humans treat grizzly bears I’m surprised that the bears don’t get even with us at every opportunity. It was Edward Abbey who said, spoonerizing the U.S. constitution, “I believe in the right to arm bears.”

Bears hardly ever attack people. Why not? It’s simple biology. If bears went after humans more often, we would have done them all in long ago. Maybe the bears know this. For whatever reason, bears are not much of a threat, and they belong in the mountains just as much as we do, perhaps more. They were there first, like the bighorn sheep and the golden eagles and the mountain goats—all of them world-famous symbols of the Canadian Rockies.

___________________________

 

 

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CORE October 2015 Newsletter

SEPTEMBER ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

We’re a bit early this month in sending out the October Newsletter, as this author will be away for a good part of October. Hope you find our newsletter both enjoyable and informative.

September was another good month for club outings, considering some events had to be cancelled due to bad weather. There were 17 events posted on the calendar, including urban walks, cycle trips, dinner and movie outings, scrambles and hikes of various levels of difficulty.

Some Highlights

Backpack trip to Stanley Mitchell HutBackpack trip to Stanley Mitchell Hut

Stanley Mitchel Weekend - CORE Member at Twin FallsStanley Mitchel Weekend – CORE Member at Twin Falls

Bike Ride Bill Milne Trail Bike Ride Bill Milne Trail

Cataract Creek ValleyCataract Creek Valley

Fullerton Loop Fullerton Loop Memorial Hike

Forgetmenot RidgeForget Me Not Ridge

Crypt Lake Hike - Burnt Rock Falls Crypt Lake Hike – Burnt Rock Falls

Waterton Park - SunriseWaterton Park – Sunrise

 

 

 

 

September Club Meeting

Last month’s club meeting was held on Tue September 29 at the Scarboro Community Centre. The presenter was David Peyto (author & former Phys.Ed. teacher) who gave a photo presentation about his interesting project, walking every street in Calgary.

CORE OCTOBER CLUB MEETING

Tues. October 27 – 7 p.m.

Join us at the Scarboro Community Hall, 1727 – 14 Ave SW. The theme for the evening will be:

Exploring the Cariboo Region

Join CORE member Chris Wright as he presents Exploring the Cariboo and Chilcotin through a collection of his photographs. This area is a sparsely populated region in central British Columbia with dramatic rolling grasslands, Douglas Fir forests, and numerous lakes.

Some highlights:

 CW Photoin the Cariboo  Cariboo 2

SAFETY

WildSmart bear activity

Bear Activity

As usual, check out the http://www.wildsmart.ca/ website for latest bear activity in the Bow Valley.

Watch your Step

Some Safety thoughts from Chairman Mike:

Whenever you are close to a big drop:

  • Look where your feet are – is the ground solid or cracked?
  • Better yet,  always have at least 3 points of contact with the rock/ground (2 feet and a hand or 1 foot and 2 hands)
  • Avoid wet slimy places
  • Mountains do not give you a second chance – if in doubt retreat

Search and Rescue at Twin FallsSearch and Rescue at Twin Falls

Many in the outdoor community took note of the fall and tragic death of a young hiker at Twin Falls in Yoho National park this past month. This is a popular stop-over spot along the Whaleback hike, and many CORE members have been to this locale. This brings to mind just how risky trekking in the mountains can be. It isn’t just bears and avalanches. But we still venture there because of the sheer lure of the mountain top.

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EXECUTIVE CORNER

Ask your Exec

If CORE members have any questions about club policies or procedures, just email us at mailbox@corehike.org and a member of the Executive will respond. If the question is of general interest, we’ll include it with the answer in the next newsletter.

Q&A’s

What is the club policy on carpooling?

Folks who have signed up for an event will meet at a spot designated by the event coordinator. People who volunteer to drive will record the total distance to trailhead and back, and be compensated by passengers at a rate of $0.25 per KM / number of people in the vehicle. Payment is traditionally made at the end of the trip. Note that the rate may change from year to year upon review by the executive.

Do all participants on a hike have to proceed at the pace of the slowest person?

Generally speaking, that is the suggestion. If the group is a large one however, it is possible for the hike leader to offer to split the group into a slower and faster group provided that each group has at least 4 members in it. Other safety precautions would apply to each smaller group such as each one having a lead and a sweep, and waiting for the whole group at any points where the trail divides and the incorrect trail could potentially be taken.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

MEC Night

MEC will be hosting a CORE club discount night on Thursday, October 22. Participants MUST bring their CORE membership card to be eligible for discounts associated with the event. MEC personnel will also host a walking tour of their outdoor clothing section and talk about layering for winter. For those interested, please arrive at MEC between 6:45 and 7:00 PM. CORE members Dave and Edna will be available to hand out identifying bracelets for the group. For further information, please email mailbox@corehike.org.

INSPIRATIONAL THOUGHTS

Our monthly quote from outdoor adventurer writers.

David by Earl BirneyEarle Alfred Birney, (1904 –1995) was a distinguished Canadian poet and novelist, who twice won the Governor General’s Award, Canada’s top literary honor, for his poetry. You can Google the poem if you want to read through the whole piece, but this little bit, although quite dated, helps explain why people go to such places.

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Excerpt from the poem “David” by Earl Birney

But always we talked of the Finger on Sawback, unknown

And hooked, till the first afternoon in September we slogged

Through the musky woods, past a swamp that quivered with frog-song,

And camped by a bottle-green lake. But under the cold

Breath of the glacier sleep would not come, the moonlight

Etching the Finger. We rose and trod past the feathery

Larch, while the stars went out, and the quiet heather

Flushed, and the skyline pulsed with the surging bloom

Of incredible dawn in the Rockies.

___________________________

 

 

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CORE Blog Subscription Validation Test

CORE LOGO

CORE LOGO

Since the CORE August newsletter was issued 2 days ago, we have ten new subscribers to the CORE Blog (up from 12 to 22), with a few questions and observations as noted below.

Q1. What does the email notification when a new Blog article is posted look like?

A1. You should receive an email from SpecificFeeds with the Subject field “CORE Society – New Message”.

Q2. How often should I receive a notification email?

A2 The depends on whether you selected “Newspaper (1 email per day) or “Single emails”. (the latter will cause an email message to be send on-the-hour whenever a blog article is posted)

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Subscription Parameters

Subscription Parameters

Q3. What should I see in the body of the email message?

A3. That depends on the subscription parameters you have set. If you have selected “The entire stories” or “Only the message headlines (which are links to the full stories)”.

Q4. What if I don’t see an emails coming in from SpecificFeeds?

A4. Check your SPAM or Junk Mail folder. Depending on your level of  security, your Blog alerts my end up there.

A5. What if I still can’t find it?

A5. It’s a mystery. If you are a CORE club member, please contact a member of the CORE executive (Webmaster or Communications Coordinator), and we’ll try to figure it out.

Thanks to you all for your participation. My hope is that over the next few months (and Newsletters), we’ll have good proportion of CORE members subscribing to the Blog. In a survey done last year by our Webmaster, around 40 members indicated interest in receiving the monthly newsletter. So I would expect a similar number of subscribers. Let’s see if we can beat that number, folks.

Best regards;

Your CORE Exec Communications Coordinator

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Subscription to the CORE Blog

CORE Blog Links

CORE Blog Links

Hello, CORE Society members (and any non-members who wish to Follow CORE news). Very soon we will be issuing the CORE monthly Newsletter as a subscription-based Blog instead of via a broadcast email to members as we have done in the past. In fact, the July Newsletter has already been reissued as a Blog, and may be accessed via the link in the Hot on the Trails section on the Core Website Home page, as shown in this snapshot. Once you have Subscribed to the Blog, you will receive notification via email about the content whenever a new news item is “posted”.

CORE Blog Subscription Button

CORE Blog Subscription Button

To Subscribe, select the Email Follow button at the top of any of the Blog pages. (Do not pick the Facebook or Twitter buttons).

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Confirm Request

Confirm Request

You will be prompted to Confirm your Subscription request.

Once you do this, an email will be sent to you by Subscription manager (SpecificFeeds) along with a password for accessing your Subscription account. Save this PW for future access to your account.

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SpecificFeeds Subscription email

SpecificFeeds Subscription email

You will receive an email that looks like this.

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Confirmation email

Confirmation email

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7. SpecificFeeds Edit Subscription..You can Edit your Subscription to specify how much information you want to receive via email.

Subscription Options

Subscription Options

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Remember to set the Delivery Options

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Update Subscription Options or Unsubscribe

Update Subscription Options or Unsubscribe

You can update your Subscription options, or Unsubscribe

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Delivery Options

Delivery Options

Delivery options can be set to deliver just the Post headlines, or the entire content of the Post e.g. the entire monthly newsletter.

Activity can be delivered once a day as a sort of “newspaper” listing all Posts that day, or as a separate delivery for each Post.

And there are options for delivery if you ahve a mobile APP or RSS feed.

 

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July Newsletter Now Here!

Here’s the July 2015 edition!

Click this to open .PDF (Need Password).

Highlights:

  • Posting events to the calendar
  • Bringing guests
  • Benefits of C.O.R.E. membership
  • Friends of Kananaskis
  • Safety tips
  • Wildsmart weekly bear activity
  • Upcoming events
    … and more…  C’mon and check it out.

We hope some of this content will be useful information to you. We like to post Safety tips and links to activities which may be of general interest to the outdoor community. If you are receiving such info and would like to share it out via the CORE Twitter feed or our Newsletter, please pass it along to mailbox@corehike.org, and we’ll get it posted.

The newsletter was also sent via Broadcast Email.   Please notify mailbox@corehike.org if you’re a member but didn’t receive it via Email (and want to).

 

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Benefits of Belonging to the CORE Society

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF BELONGING TO THE C.O.R.E. Society?

As a member of the CORE Society, you can:

  • Participate in a wide variety of outdoor activities with like-minded people who are passionate about the outdoors
  • Easily meet and get to know other members because CORE is a smaller more intimate club
  • Increase and maintain your fitness level, year-round
  • Attend informative monthly presentations on all things related to outdoor activity
  • Find out what’s new on the events calendar by receiving an automatic e-mail notification
  • Receive a monthly newsletter with content on outdoor safety tips and plans for club activities
  • Attend at least two social events per year (Christmas party and AGM) with free food and drinks
  • Participate in other special events or social outings, such as movie nights, dining out, tennis, art walks, etc.
  • Offer to give a presentation at a monthly meeting of your travel adventures
  • Learn a new outdoor sport, such as cross-country skiing or scrambling
  • Explore the beauty and awe-inspiring scenery of nature’s playground right at our back door
  • Get CORE sponsored courses to help you enjoy the outdoors even more

 

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