CORE’s Annual General Meeting and Social – Tuesday, May 28 at 7:00pm

At the upcoming AGM, CORE members will elect their new Executive committee for the 2019/20 membership year. In addition to the elections, the presentation will show achievements, financial statements, trip coordinators (with awards), the Chicken Mountain Award (with stories) and door prizes, after which will be a slide show of events from the past year, food, drinks, music and fun.

If you would like to nominate a member for the executive or would like more information please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Renewal of Membership for 2019/20 membership year

It is now time to renew your membership for the next membership year. This can be done online using a credit/debit card. However, if you wish to renew by cash or cheque at the AGM, please complete the Membership Form online BEFOREHAND, indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to bring a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email), signed by you, to the AGM, along with your payment. HANDWRITTEN MEMBERSHIP FORMS CANNOT BE ACCEPTED.

Members and Guests please join us for May’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

 

Harvey with his beloved chicken

May 27 – Deadline – For Chicken Mountain Award

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have to May 27 to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org . At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee will be chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of the trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

 

 

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

 

Preparing a thermal wrap

Wilderness First Aid Course 

Wilderness First Aid Course was attended by 12 CORE members. The course opened up many discussions on how prepared you are prior to the meetup of the event. What is needed for an incident while on a event. The course also, covered the ABC’s of first aid as well many different ways to treat an incident while on the event. Key item to remember is when you are out in the mountains, cell phones may not work, who is aware of your arrival time back home, and how prepared you are  in case you have an emergency in the mountains?

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

 
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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

April  and May 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 23 to April 22, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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April 19 Elbow Valley Sulphur Springs Loop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 21 Nose Hill Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 22 Tennis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 27 Wilderness First Aid Course

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 11 Friendship Trail Turner Valley Black Diamond

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Destination Moraine Lake, Banff National Park?!!!!

As we are aware, unless you arrive at Moraine Lake Road by 8 am in the morning, your access may not be allowed. Vehicles are only permitted on the Moraine Lake road when parking is available at Moraine Lake. Parking fills up quickly. Travel to the lake is restricted once the parking lots are full.

A daily shuttle is available from May 24 to October 14, 2019, from the Lake Louise lakeshore to Moraine Lake. Shuttles leaving Moraine Lake will return to the Lake Louise  Park and Ride. Moraine Lake road is open from mid-May to mid-October and closed in the winter. Tickets can be purchased at the Lake Louise lakeshore for scheduled departures.

Fares:

  • Adult: $6
  • Senior (over 65): $3
  • Youth (under 18): $3
  • Child (under 6): Free

Schedule:

  • Shuttles leave from the Lake Louise lakeshore every 20 minutes from 8:40 am to 4:20 pm headed to Moraine Lake.
  • Last shuttle to the Lake Louise Park and Ride leaves at 5:40 pm.
  • Daily between May 24 to October 14

Early Bird Shuttle to Moraine Lake

New for 2019 Parks Canada will offer morning shuttles to Moraine Lake for visitors wanting to get an early start to the day. Space is limited so arrive early. Tickets for the Early Bird Shuttle are available at the Lake Louise Park and Ride.

Fares:

  • Adult:$8
  • Senior (over 65): $4
  • Youth (under 18): $4
  • Child (under 6): Free

Schedule:

  • Starting at 6 am, four departures from the Lake Louise Park and Ride are available until 7.30 am.
  • Return shuttles from Moraine Lake to the Lake Louise Park and Ride will be available from 9 am to 5:40 pm daily

The Moraine Lake shuttled does not stop at the Paradise Valley trailhead. You need to arrive prior to 8 am to secure parking to this trailhead.

For more information go to Parks Canada Moraine Lake.

Lake Louise Ski Area Planning to Give Parks Canada 1000 hectares in exchange to upgrade their current space on the Mountain

After years of negotiating, Parks Canada and Lake Louise Ski Resort have come up with a long range plan.  Dan Markham from Lake Louise Ski Resort stated the listed changes would be done within the resort’s existing footprint. Lake Louise’s leasehold is going to be reduced by almost 50 per cent. As they will be giving back about 1,000 hectares of undeveloped land that was part of their original leasehold. They are giving this land back to Parks Canada for protection “from now until the end of time” in exchange for being able to do upgrades and developments.

What is currently proposed in the Long-Range Plan:

  • Construction of water reservoirs at the Old Gondola Base adjacent to the Pipestone River near Corral Creek in the Temple area
  • Expansion of Temple Lodge
  • New Lifts and Ski terrain on Richardson’s Ridge
  • New mountain top lodge on Eagle Ridge
  • New day lodge in the base area
  • New lifts and ski terrain on the front side of Whitehorn Mountain
  • New warming hut near the upper terminal of Top-of-the-World lift
  • Development of access and egress routes in West Bowl
  • Redevelopment of parking areas at the base

Lake Louise Ski Resort will close summer operations at its mid-mountain lodge, to move completely out of the grizzly bear corridor for the summer. This plan will give Parks Canada major gains in conservation, visitor experience and education. The next step is a 60-day public consultation on the long-range plan which concluded with open houses in April 2019. Public comment closes June 15, 2019. At the conclusion of the consultations, Parks Canada will provide direction to Lake Louise Ski Resort for any necessary changes or additions to the detailed impact assessment or long-range plan based on public input. No decisions have been made at this time. Canada’s Environment minister will have final approval. Lake Louise Ski Resort hopes to start the new proposals by next spring (2020). For more information go to Parks Canada. 

UCP Cancels Bighorn Country Parks Proposal

Last November, NDP government announced eight new parks covering 4,000 square kilometers in what is known as Bighorn Country along the eastern edges of Banff and Jasper National Parks.

Alberta’s new Environment Minister Jason Nixon states the UCP government will not go ahead with the proposal. UCP state the consultation process was flawed and there was some questions and concerns that residents, municipal officials had raised requiring how the proposal might affect oil and gas exploration, the forest industry and off-road vehicle use.

The NDP’s plan called for a variety of permitted activities and provided $40 million over five years for campsites and other infrastructure. Off-highway vehicles, horse packing and hunting would have continued with new restrictions. Grazing leases would have remained and no existing trail closures. This proposal would have protected the headwaters of the North Saskatchewan River, which provides drinking water to people in central and northern Alberta (including Edmonton).

The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society is concerned about the cancelation of the proposal. They state the Bighorn Country area needs to be protected due to its important area for drinking water  and for the different species of wildlife and plants. CPWS hopes the UCP will do a review of the previous work and incorporate it into a new plan.

Nixon wants to see both an economic and environmental assessment of the proposal to better understand the challenges this proposal provides. And a better consultation process for all parties that are affected.

Spilled Grain from February Train Derailment still not cleaned up in Banff Park

The closure of the Bow Valley Parkway was set to end on April 1, but this deadline has now been extended to July 31, 2019. The parkway maybe open sooner depending on the cleanup. For updates go to Parks Canada Banff Bulletins.

Be ALERT for Bear Activity in this area.

Alert has been issued for Canmore, Redwood and Bragg Creek due to Grizzly, Black Bears and Cougars roaming these areas.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Opening of Highways into Provincial Parks starts May 14 including the Sheep River Road, Highway #546. For information for other highway openings in the Kananaskis Park area go to Alberta Parks road closure bulletin.  

 

Trail Closures and Trail Report Links

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Dr Seuss hiking quote

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

 Canada Warming up Twice as fast as the rest of the world and it is Irreversible

A new Scientific report by Environment and Climate Change Canada states “Canada is warming up twice as fast as the rest of world and that warming is irreversible.” Warming is happening even faster in winter, leaving southern Canadians with more winter rainfall and northern Canadians with melting permafrost and less sea ice. The Artic is hit the hardest, as it is warming three times as fast as the rest of the world. By the middle of this century it would leave most marine regions in the Canadian North ice-free for at least a month at a time.

If nothing is done to reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions building in the atmosphere Canadians will end up with 10 times as many deadly heat waves, which will create more wildfires and twice as many extreme rainstorms. As well as a steady rise in coastal waters, which will determine how long people will be able to live in coastal communities.

2018 was one of the warmest years on record:

The surface temperature in 2018 was the 4th warmest year on record over the past 140 years since records have been kept. Per NASA and NOAA scientists there has been up and down spikes in temperatures over the last decades. But the rise in temperatures suddenly has been correlated to the rise in greenhouse gas emissions. This continuing sudden increase of warming, is causing steep challenges for governments to reverse the man-made effects. The Paris agreement had set out 1.5 Celsius degree temperature change but this could be exceeded between 2020 and 2023. Much sooner than expected, by the Paris Agreement of 2030. The climate scientists have predicated the extreme climate swings and this winter’s polar vortex.

The last four years have been the warmest:

  • 2018 4th warmest
  • 2017 2nd warmest
  • 2016the warmest
  • 2015 3rd warmest

Note: At the Paris agreement Canada agreed to lower it greenhouse gas emissions to 30% by 2030. From 2005 to 2017 actual reduction is 2%.

Parks Canada has started many new projects in protecting ecosystems and wildlife due to climate change. They are doing studies on climate change in different areas of Canada.

Listed below 3 climate change studies by Parks Canada:

  1. Study the capacity of eelgrass and salt marshes to absorb carbon (study is being done on the west coast)
  2. Finding the carbon balance – ecosystems absorb carbon dioxide through trees, soil, mosses and phytoplankton and they release the gas through decomposition and fires. Gathering information using forest inventory (type of forest) and information on wildfires, insect infestations and prescribed fires. To determine which park releases more carbon than it stores, or vice versa. This will help to understand the living landscape of carbon and how it has changed in the last 28 years.
  3. Climate Change Assessment in Norther National Parks – One of the goals is to consider the possible impacts of climate change on northern wildlife. The report to date has shown that the lemming and polar bear were extremely vulnerable to climate change.  If this wildlife is affected so will its predators – e.g. arctic and red fox. This becomes a dominion affect, not just on wildlife but on the entire ecosystem.

For more information on Parks Canada climate change studies visit their website.

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….see you on the trails …

Jane