April 30, 2019 Meeting

Members and Guests please join us for April’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.

Dave and Edna in Corsica

April 30 Presentation: A 326 KM walk thru Corsica and Spain:

Core members Dave and Edna will present their 2018, 326 km walking trip thru Corsica and Spain. You will see the Pyrenees Mountain Range in the southern area of Corsica and finish in the Basque region of Spain. Some of Dave and Edna’s journey also, took them into France. Their walking journey took 17 days to complete. Come see their spectacular photos.

 

 

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Coordinator’s Meeting for Summer Events  – April 23

Calling all hikers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, scramblers,camping even if you have never led an event – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you. Mike has many guide books, maps, computers to help navigate any unknown routes. This meeting is for all current CORE coordinators and any CORE members who are interested in becoming an event coordinator or just wishing to have some input on a particular trip.

The Executive Trip Coordinator will be holding an event coordinators meeting on April 23, 2019, at 7 pm at his home. For more information go to CORE Calendar. And as a reminder to all current and new event coordinators, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS GUIDELINES  posted on the CORE website. These guides are a collection of “knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities

First Aider Kim fixes Mary’s injury

Wilderness First Aid Course Scheduled for April 27

CORE is sponsoring a “Non Certified” Wilderness First Aid training course on April 27, 2019, at Bragg Creek Community Centre – 23 White Ave. Cost is $15.00 dollars per person. Nicole Elder is the instructor. She provides first aid instruction to the Calgary Police Service members. She has extensive training and expertise and experience in Wilderness First Aid, Survival Training and Search and Rescue. There will be classroom training and outdoor scenario’s. After scenario training there will be general survival techniques. Dress for the weather as some instruction is outside. Course is limited to 24 participants. There will be a wait list so anyone unable to attend is asked to contact the coordinator as soon as possible. There will be an “option” for members to buy a wilderness first aid manual at a cost of $45.00 dollars each. You can register online, on the CORE Website Activities page. A non-refundable $15.00 dollars is requested and can be paid online via PayPal, cash or cheque is acceptable if received prior to registration deadline. Final day for course registration is April 22, 2019. Non-members need to first join CORE ($15.00 Winter/Spring membership) and then can participate in the course.   For more contact information, go to the CORE calendar for April 27, 2019.

 

May 13 – Deadline – For Chicken Mountain Award

If you think that someone is worthy of winning the coveted Chicken Mountain Award, you have to May 13 to submit your story to mailbox@corehike.org . At the upcoming AGM, the stories will be read and the most worthy nominee will be chosen by a show of hands. The nominee can be the coordinator of the trip where some misadventure or unusual experience happened, or a trip participant who managed to add some excitement to the outing.

CORE Annual General Meeting and Social May 28

We should all give thanks to our CORE executive, for their time and energy they put into running the club. At the annual general meeting on May 28, 2019 CORE members will be electing their new Executive. If you are interested and would like some further information about joining the executive, please send an email to mailbox@corehike.org.

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to Mike.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

March and April 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for March 23 to April 22, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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March 23 Jumping Pound Loop Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 30 Mt Murray Snowshoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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March 30 West Nose Hill Creek Park Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 6 Silver Springs Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 6 Sulphur Mt Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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April 13 Foran Grade Sheep Creek

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Internal Parks Canada report looks for ways to make money by selling, transferring assets

Parks Canada owns about 15,000 infrastructure assets – buildings, roads, dams, etc., worth $17.5 billion dollars. About $8.3 billion of that asset pool is considered non-core (highways, bridges, dams). About half the entire inventory is considered to be in poor condition or very poor condition, requiring up to $2.9 billion in deferred repairs.

Putting tolls on highways that run through Parks Canada sites in Western Canada could net the federal agency about $85 million a year, per a consultants report on how to manage the parks roads, bridges and dams. This estimate was based on using a one-way toll of $2.50 per vehicle and it would cover the costs to build the toll booths, staff them and administration costs. This proposal is not likely to happen. Under the federal parks act, there needs to be an alternative “free route available for the public.” It was suggested in the report to contract out highway maintenance to the private sector or other levels of government. The non-core bridges and dams could be transferred to the province. These proposals could save money, in its operational spending. Parks Canada is currently looking at the consultants report to determine, the best way to proceed.

Spilled Grain from February Train Derailment still not cleaned up in Banff Park

Parks Canada and CP Rail continue to clean up, the spilled grain, from the February 28 train derailment, near the Johnston Canyon hiking trail and the Fireside picnic area. This has led to a closure of the Bow Valley Parkway. Parks Canada oversees the cleanup, CP Rail is responsible for the clean-up of the derailment site.

All derailed train cars and large pieces of metal have been removed by CP Rail. There is still a lot of grain to be cleaned up. The canola is spread all through the forest floor and down into the moss areas that were heavily damaged when the cars hit.

Hibernating animals are starting to wake up, which is presenting another challenge for the  clean-up efforts. The animals may smell the grain and head to it in search for food. Parks Canada has erected an eight foot electrical fence around the derailment site, which will give animals that attempt to get inside a small shock, in hopes of stopping them from eating the grain.  They are also diverting animals to alternating food sources placed  a distance away. Bears travel the rails at this time of year, as the tracks tend to be free of snow and often have small amounts of spilled grain along them.

The closure of the Bow Valley Parkway was set to end on April 1, but this deadline has now been extended to July 31, 2019. The parkway maybe open sooner depending on the cleanup. For updates go to Parks Canada Banff Bulletins.

Be ALERT for Bear Activity in this area.

Proposed National Park Reserve in the South Okanagan – Similkameen

In a joint government announcement in October 2017 regarding a renewed commitment, the Government of Canada, the Government of BC and the Syilx/Okanagan Nation are developing recommendations, including models for cooperative management, regarding  the establishment of a national park reserve in the South Okanagan – Similkameen.  Recent focus has been on the development of a national park reserve including a boundary.  Parks Canada sought feedback during the public consultations from December 10 2018 to March 15 2019.

In 2002 representatives of the Okanagan Nation Alliance and community members were the first proponents for protecting the area around the South Okanagan Grasslands Protected Area as a national park reserve. In 2003 the governments of Canada and BC steering committee was established as a result of signing of a Memorandum of Understanding to cooperate on assessing the feasibility of establishing a national park reserve in the Okanagan – Similkameen. The principal difference between  a national park and a national park reserve is that the term “reserve” is used to recognize that there are unresolved claims of Aboriginal rights in the area.  Indigenous people can continue to participate in traditional land uses and spiritual activities,  and may be involved in cooperative management with Parks Canada.

By protecting this area, it will help support the recovery of over 30 federally listed species at risk, and over 60 provincially listed species. The shrub steppe ecosystem found in the interior of BC, including the South Okanagan – Similkameen, is recognized as one of the country’s most endangered natural systems. These rare areas of semi-arid desert are the only occurrence of this ecosystem in Canada. It represents an area of significant ecological, geographic, and cultural importance with a wide range of recreational and tourism opportunities.

There has been opposition to this park. Per the director of Okanagan-Similkameen Preservation Society, there has not been any discussion with the federal government regarding possible tax increases to support infrastructure for the park, such as wear and tear on roads and the strain of local first responders if the park entices more people to explore the back country. Parks Canada has not come forward with its budget for park development. Recreational and ranchers, have concerns. Highway #3 from Osoyoos to Keremeos will still be under provincial responsibility,  even thou there could be more traffic due to the new park.

Parks Canada stated that the federal government has no jurisdiction over property rights on privately owned land adjacent to the boundaries of a national park. Land owners and communities adjacent to the proposed national park reserve will retain full authority over their lands. Lands within the national park reserve would only be acquired by mutual agreement. As set out in the Canada National Parks Act. The government of Canada cannot expropriate private property in order to enlarge or establish a national park or reserve. Private lands would only be purchased on a willing seller-buyer basis, based upon independent property appraisals. A transition plan between the Government of BC and the national parks reserve is currently under development.

To learn more on this new park reserve go to Parks Canada Website.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Andy Rooney hiking quote

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

 Spring Time is the start of Tick season in Alberta

Male and Female Tick

Tick season has started in Alberta. Ticks are small spider like animals that bite to fasten themselves onto the skin and feed on the blood. It is important to remove a tick immediately to avoid a potential infection or diseases and submit it for testing. The testing helps to assess the Lyme disease risk to the person and pets.

 

 

 

 

Facts about Ticks:

  • There are over 800 kinds of ticks in the world. 650 are hard bodied and the rest are soft. It’s the hard cover tick that hikers encounter.
  • Adult tick’s range in size from .4 cm to 1.4 cm long.
  • They are oval shaped and appear to have a reddish leathery body with eight legs.
  • Ticks are part of the spider family.
  • Ticks hunt by clinging to grass and shrubs along paths frequented by potential hosts. When a host passes by the tick climbs on.
  • Ticks can sense its host from as far away as 25 feet by the carbon dioxide the host gives off.
  • Once on the host, the tick attaches itself to the skin and sucks the blood. A feeding tick can increase 20 to 50 times its size.
  • Detaching a tick from the host can be accomplished by waiting for it to become fully engorged and then removing it.

 If a tick is attached to your skin, you can safely remove it:

  • Using tweezers, gently grasp its head and mouth parts as close to your skin as possible.
  • Without squeezing the tick, slowly pull the tick straight up off the skin, with a steady backward force until the tick releases its hold – do not jerk or twist it.
  • You must remove any tick parts remaining to prevent infection. If the head is buried beneath the skin and cannot be seized with tweezers, you will require medical attention to remove the tick.
  • Do NOT apply matches, cigarettes, alcohol, oil, tape or petroleum jelly to induce the tick to pull out. These are not effective methods and may prompt the tick to empty its stomach contents into the wound.
  • A technique that may prove effective, is to cool the area near the tick with snow or ice. This cools off the tick’s external environment and slows the blood flow in the area. It is possible the combination of the cooling and tweezering would encourage the tick to detach in order to seek more optimal conditions.
  • Once the tick has been removed, clean the bite area with soap and water and disinfect the area with an antiseptic. Wash hands with soap and water.
  • Save the tick in a clean empty container. You can put more than one tick in the container.
  • Add a small piece of tissue or cotton ball, lightly moistened with water, put into the container to prevent the tick(s) from drying out.
  • Submit the tick for testing as soon as possible. In Alberta ticks seldom carry diseases.     

Submit a tick for testing to:

  • Alberta Health Services Environmental Health Office. In Calgary call 403-943-2400.
  • Your Health Care Provider
  • Veterinarian

Protect yourself from Ticks:

  • Walk on cleared trails whenever possible, avoid walking in tall grassy or wooded areas.
  • Wear light-coloured clothing and cover up as much skin as possible. eg: a hat, long sleeved shirt, long pants with the legs tucked into the boots.
  • Use a bug spray that contains the chemical DEET or Icaridin to repel ticks and reapply as frequently as directed.
  • It takes many hours for a tick to attach itself to a host:
    • Check yourself for ticks after leaving a grassy or wooded area where ticks may live.
    • Check your pets for ticks after they have been outside. You cannot get Lyme disease from your pet, but you can bring infected ticks inside. These ticks can fall off your pet and attach themselves to you. 

If you do get a tick bite and have the following symptoms you should seek medical attention:

  • A round, red rash that spreads at the site of a tick bite, know as a “bulls eye rash”.
  • Flu-like symptoms: tiredness, headaches, sore muscles and joints and fever.

Tick-Borne Diseases are rare but include:

  • Lyme
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Tularemia

 

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….see you on the trails …