Executive News

June 25, 2019 monthly meeting, a motion to change a bylaw will be put forth

Due to frequent lack of attendance at some of our meetings, the Executive committee has decided not to hold our monthly meetings in July and August, resuming meetings in September.

In accordance with the CORE bylaws, this Special Resolution must be passed by a minimum of 75% of the votes cast at the meeting, the next one being on June 25. Please come and support your club and take part in this Special Resolution which, if passed, will mark the last meeting before we resume again in September.

June 25, 2019 CORE presentation

 Stretching for the Avid Hiker and What’s in your Back Pack

Preparing a thermal wrap

Stretching for the Avid Hiker:

Pre and Post stretches for the avid hiker and a brief introductory to reflexology by CORE member Pamela Anderson a massage therapist, reflexologist and energy worker.

 “What’s in your Back Pack”

How prepared are you for your safety and health on a hike? 12 CORE members attended a Wilderness First Aid Course on April 27th. The course really made you think about your own safety, even before you leave for the hike. I will be talking on how prepared are you and could you survive an emergency with items in your back pack. Plus a demonstration on making a splint and sling, and a thermal wrap.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the executive, and we will see what can be arranged.  Members and Guests please join us for June’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 from 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Ave SW.

On May 28, 2019 CORE elected it’s 2019/2020 Executive:

Chair: Mike, Co-Chair: Chad, Secretary: Laura, Treasurer: Craig, Webmaster: Stu, Membership Coordinator: Stu, Executive Trip Coordinator: Julia, Communication Coordinator: Jane, Presentation Coordinator: Pam, Member at Large: Marion. 

The recipient of the 2019/20 Mountain Chicken Award  was Mike G.

 

Upcoming CORE Special Events:

June 28 – Bike Maintenance 101 at MEC – Fix a Flat

With more members out cycling, this would be a handy lesson. You need to register at MEC yourself.  Register quickly as spacing is filling up. Details on CORE calendar.

July 1 – Canada Day – Celebrate with CORE

Come and celebrate Canada Day with CORE. There will be a short hike with a barbeque at Edworthy Park. For details go to CORE calendar.

August 2 to 5 – CORE’s Annual August Hiking Weekend in Crowsnest Pass

Members wishing to join the group in Coleman for the hiking weekend should book their accommodation as soon as possible, while there are a few rooms remaining. All details on CORE calendar.

 

Renewal of Membership for 2019/20 membership year

It is now time to renew your membership for the next membership year. This can be done online using a credit/debit card. However, if you wish to renew by cash or cheque at the AGM, please complete the Membership Form online BEFOREHAND, indicating that you will pay by Cash/Cheque. The form is on Corehike.org website on the “Join Now” tab. Please remember to bring a printout of the membership confirmation (received by email), signed by you, to the AGM, along with your payment. HANDWRITTEN MEMBERSHIP FORMS CANNOT BE ACCEPTED.

 

2008 Hailstone Butte

CORE Celebrates 20 years

Core will be celebrating 20 years in November. A “memories” photo album has been setup and club members are invited to view the album and/or upload photos of events and/or people that have a special meaning to them. There are instructions on how to upload photos to the album on the CORE guides web page.

 

 

 

Executive Updates:

  1. Event coordinators are requested where possible to scan event reports and email them to mailbox@corehike.org. or give the reports to the Executive Trip Coordinator at a CORE meeting.
  2. Event Coordinators and Participants are encouraged to post photos from ongoing outings onto the CORE website.
  3. Members/Non-members mailing in fees for courses or membership should include a note as to what/who the money is for, and ideally the associated form. Otherwise the executive may not know why we are receiving the funds.

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

May and June 2019

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for May 19 to June 9, 2019. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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May 19 Mt Lady MacDonald

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 26 Ford Knoll Elbow Valley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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May 28 CORE AGM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 1 1st Peak of Nihahi Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 2 Edgemont Nose Creek Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 4 Prairie View Barrier Lookout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 7 Inglewood Night Market

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 8 Vents Ridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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June 9 Chestermere Bike Ride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

Alberta’s Provincial Fire Watch Towers

Barrier Lookout Fire Watcher

On a CORE hike up to Barrier Lookout, we met Shelly the fire watch warden for this lookout. Shelly was very informative. In the last three weeks prior to June 4, they had spotted 10 wildfires between the Barrier, Moose Summit and Mockingbird lookouts. These fires were called into Alberta Wildfire and crews came out to extinguished them quickly, before they grew any bigger.

Lookout Towers are an important part of the wildfire detection system in Alberta. Fire Lookouts are located where visibility is favourable to detect and report wildfires. The towers are either a cabin or steel towers located on the highest ground. There are 127 lookouts located in the province of Alberta. Lookout observers are also responsible for reporting wildlife in a 40 km radius around their cabin or tower. Each lookout covers an area of approximately 5,000 square kilometers.

The province of British Columbia closed all their fire watch towers. The fires are not spotted until they are much larger. Making these fires harder to put out.

 Waterton Lakes National Park rebuilds following the 2017 Kenow Wildfire

The Kenow wildfire burned over 35,000 hectares of land in total. It burned 19,000 hectares in Waterton Park and the rest in BC. The fire burned 39 per cent of the parks area and destroyed over 30 assets.

In order to rebuild what was lost, $96 million from the federal government’s infrastructure is to be invested in 18 projects and an additional $20.9 million to support Waterton Lakes National Parks ongoing recovery from the 2017 Kenow wildfire.

Projects resulting in a closure or major impact include:

  • Bear Hump Trail – to rebuild the steps
  • Work to repair and enhance Cameron Falls viewpoints
  • Red Rock Parkway – to open in summer of 2019
  • Akamina Parkway
  • Townsite Campground, loops B and H
  • Visitor Center
  • Crandell Mountain Campground

For further projects that may impact visitors go to Parks Canada website.

Many of the hiking trails are open.

Rockies Institute in Canmore wants to share Indigenous solutions to handling wildfires in Alberta

Rockies Institute in Canmore received a $500,000 from Natural Resources Canada as part of a climate change study initiative. Minister stated that “we need to explore options where we work with local communities to empower them, tapping into local knowledge and how we actually fight wildfires and come up with initiatives that allow us to reduce the impact of climate change but also find sustainable long-term solutions to the changing climate.

Wildfires have been around along time, as well as fire management. The president of the Rockies Institute in Canmore, “we need a project that melds traditional Indigenous teachings with today’s wildfire problems, but we are not learning from the past.” The goal is to train today’s community members to collect those stories from elders and then share the information on their terms with scientific professionals to find ways to handle the problem differently that uses Indigenous teachings.

Examples: Dead Fall if left in the forest could cause a fire hazard. You can go in and use that dead fall by building something traditional with it. You don’t just clear it away. Also deliberately set burns have been done for ages. In Vancouver, they are using Indigenous knowledge in their method of burning smaller burns at different times of the year. Australia has used this concept for 20 years and is having a positive impact on the number of wildfires.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Events:

Friends of Fish Creek Park is offering different events regarding the park’s history, wildlife, archaelology and other events in the park this spring/summer/fall. Visit Friends of

Fish Creek Park event calendar for daily and weekly events.

Friends of Fish Creek Park Speaker Series:

Badgers in your Backyard:  A glimpse into the ecology of an important predator – presented by Nicole Heim a local wildlife ecologist.  June 19, 2019 from 7 pm to 9 pm at Fish Creek Environmental Learning Center. You must register thru Eventbrite.

 Alert has been issued for Canmore, Kananaskis Country, Redwood and Bragg Creek due to Grizzly, Black Bears and Cougars roaming these areas.

How to Deal with Grizzly Attacks

Outdoor has a video on “How to deal with Grizzly Attacks.”  There is some interesting facts in this video and article. Did you know that Grizzly bears can charge at 35 miles per hour and reach their stride in their first bound. Grizzles will give you no warning if they are going to attack you. Best line of defense is still your bear spray. Remember if you see a grizzly back away slowly, until you have broken visual contact, then leave the area immediately.

 Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

The Highwood Pass along highway #40 and the Moraine Lake Road in Banff Park are now open.

Trail Closures and Trail Report Links

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

Hiking quote – unknown

For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Poisonous Plants

3 Poisonous Plants

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy is a straggling or climbing woody vine and can cause an itchy rash. It grows on sandy, stony, or rocky shores and sprouts in thickets, in clearings and along the borders of woods and roadsides. It is a glossy perennial and is spread by seed or by producing shoots from its extensive underground stems.

All parts of the poison ivy plant, including the roots contain the poisonous resin urushiol. Contact with any broken part of the plant may cause a reaction. You may develop symptoms 24 to 48 hours after contact. The inflamed areas often blisters, which leads to intense itchiness. The rash spreads through exposure to the sap, not from the sores themselves. A person needs to come in contact with the sap, not the plant, to develop an allergic reaction .

The leaves of poison ivy have three pointed leaflets. The middle leaflet has a much longer stalk than the two side ones. The leaf can be smooth or toothed, but are rarely lobed. size varies from 8 to 55 mm in length. They are reddish when they appear in the spring, turn green during the summer and in fall have various shades of yellow, orange and red. The plant stems are woody. Grows as a trailing vine with an upright leafy stalks 10 to 80 cm high. Another type is an aerial vine that may clime from 6 to 10 meters high on trees, posts, or rough surfaces. The plant produces clusters of yellow-green flowers during the months of June and July. In September the plant produces berries. The berries are clustered, round, waxy and green to yellow in colour. The size of the berries range from 3 to 7 mm in diameter, and they remain on the low, leafless stems of the plant all winter.

Dead poison ivy plants can still cause rashes, as the urushiol oil can stay active on any surface for up to 5 years. Wear gloves, pants and long sleeve shirts when handling these plants.

No animal can get a rash from poison ivy, but they can get the urushiol oil on their fur, and transmit to a person.

Poison Oak

Poison Oak has an oat-looking leaves. It usually has multi-lobbed leaves, no aerial roots on the stems and fuzzy fruits and leaves. Poison Oak is usually only found in southern British Columbia.

Poison Sumac

Poison Sumac tends to grow in wet soil conditions, has tiny sweet-smelling flowers in the spring. It is brightly covered with red and yellow leaves in the fall with 7 to 15 leaflets. And has cream coloured berries.

All three can cause skin rashes from the urushiol oil in the sap.

Two other Poisonous Plants in Alberta

Death Camas

Death Camas

The Death Camas is common throughout southern Alberta. It can be found in grasslands and in moist areas (e.g. around the edges of sloughs). It flowers in early summer and has long grass-like leaves coming from the base of the stem and small bunches of cream coloured flowers. The Death Camas grows from 20 to 40 cm tall. The bulb of this flower is extremely poisonous.

 

Prairie Crocus

Prairie Crocus

The Prairie Crocus is found in the prairies, hillsides, and dry open woods. The leaves are long-stalked and divided into threes. Blue, purple or nearly white flowers that are hairy on the back. It grows 10 to 40 cm tall. All parts of the prairie crocus are poisonous when eaten, and irritating when they come in contact with the skin.

 

 

 

There are many more poisonous plants and flowers in Alberta. When in doubt, avoid touching an unknown plant until it has been identified.

Sandy Cross conversation website has a section on different wildlife, trees, plants and flowers found in southern Alberta.

 

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….see you on the trails …

Jane