EXECUTIVE CORNER

CORE Annual Christmas Weekend

Reminder of CORE’s Annual Christmas Weekend is November 30 to December 2, 2018.  Snowshoe and Cross country skiing activities are planned. Staying at the Inn of the Rockies – Harvie Heights/Canmore.  Please refer to CORE Calendar for more information.

November CORE Meeting

CORE Xmas Party

November 27, 2018 Is CORE’s Christmas Party.  

There will be food, drinks, socializing, retelling of adventures past and planned, and a slide show of past winter activities. There will be a contest based on quiz questions from the Aug, Sept, Oct and Nov Newsletters and a Christmas song and slideshow featuring events from last winter’s activities.  Members and guests welcome. Join for a fun evening at Scarboro Community Hall – 1727 – 14th Ave. S.W. 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

If YOU have an idea for a presenter who may be willing to give us a talk on their adventures, please send their particulars along to the   executive, and we’ll see what can be arranged.

Remember there is no core meeting in December. The next CORE monthly meeting will be January 29, 2019

Coordinator Meeting Held  November 6:

A successful meeting with several coordinators and quite a few new winter trips put into the calendar to start off the winter activities.  Members posting calendar events should not send them out as email notifications more than one month in advance as this is adding to unnecessary emails which should be sent out near the event. Note that calendar events can be set up to send out emails at a selected number of days before the event.

CORE’s event coordinators have done some pre-planning for activities for this winter. These of course will depend on weather and the amount of snowfall. And more trips will be posted, sometimes on short notice. Members, please keep an eye on the CORE Activities Calendar for updates.  A summary of calendar events planned for the upcoming winter season is posted here as a blog on the CORE website.

CORE will offer Subsidized Outdoor courses for members:

If you would like to see a particular course (eg: first aid, gps, navigation, avalanche, x-country ski, other) subsidized by CORE from the Peterman Fund, please email CORE at mailbox@corehike.org

Members Corner

CORE Executive has agreed to have a “members corner” in the Newsletter.  This space is for all members to post personal items to sell or buy, trips that you are planning and would like a companion, etc..  Please see the Members Corner section near the end of the newsletter for further details.

CORE Twitter Feed Restored to the CORE Home Page

The CORE Twitter feed @corehike has been restored to the CORE Home page, with full 280 character and image capability. CORE communications for special events events, monthly presentations and weekly activities summaries, as well as occasional re-tweets of relevant outdoor-related posts (e.g. avalanche conditions, trail conditions) will now appear on the Twitter feed section of https://corehike.org/  .

CORE Photo Album

All CORE members participating in CORE activities are welcome and encouraged to post photos taken on your outings in the CORE website Photo Albums. There are Photo Management instructions on the CORE Guides web page. If you have any trouble uploading your photos, please ask the event coordinator or other experienced CORE member. Some guidelines when posting photos :

  • Post just the highlights of the event
  • No parking lot photos. We should not identify members vehicles
  • Do not post unflattering pictures of other members
  • If you mention a person’s name, use only the person’s first name

Contacting your Executive

CORE has a couple of purpose-oriented email addresses through which you can contact various executive members. If you have a general question about the club, for instance what activities are coming up, presenters planned, etc, please email us at mailbox@corehike.org. If it is a question about membership or joining the club, please direct your query to membership@corehike.org.

Remember that our CORE Executive members are volunteers who also have day jobs and a life outside of CORE, so please be patient if it takes a few days to respond to your queries.

October CORE Meeting

Lori Beattie’s presentation on Calgary’s Best Walks and Mountain Adventures was well received. With 34 members attending the presentation.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

November 2018

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for September. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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October 27 Cochrane Urban Hike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 28 Red Ridge Scramble

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 30 Sheep River Trail Mt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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October 31 Halloween Dance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 3 Brown Lowery Provincial Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 4 Bluerock Creek Trail

 

 

 

 

 

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November  10 Weaselhead Trail

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November 11 Jumping Pound Loop

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November 18 Stoneworks Canyon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NEWS & NOTES

 Hundreds of Hectares of trees being removed from Jasper Park Area

Above the Jasper townsite, 350 hectares of trees are being removed as part of a wildfire risk reduction project. It’s an expansion of the community fireguard that has been maintained for the last 30 years. Thousands of pine beetle-infested lodgepole pine trees and mature spruce trees are being removed to make it easier for crews to battle a potential wildfire. The firebreak extends from Patricia Lake to Highway 16. A large number of hiking trails in the Pyramid Bench area are being impacted the tree removal. This project is expected to be completed by spring 2019.     Whistler Campground is receiving a massive upgrade that also, includes tree removal. 60 percent of the campground’s 100 hectare’s will be removed. Most of the trees are already dead or pine infested and are being removed for safety reasons and fire risk reduction. Some trees are being removed for construction to allow wider roads and sites. Campground will re-open in the spring of 2020.    Thousands of trees along the east boundary of Jasper National Park will be burnt to slow the spread of mountain pine beetles.

The Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor

A parcel of land in the Crowsnest Pass has been protected and named in honor of former premier Jim Prentice.  The Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor is roughly five kilometers wide from east to west. It will connect Crown forest reserve land in the north to the Castle parks, as well as to Waterton Lakes National Park in the south and the adjoining Glacier National Park on the U.S. side.  Officials with the Nature Conservancy of Canada said the project has international significance as it will allow wildlife to travel freely through the Rocky Mountains in Canada and the United States.  The Alberta Provincial government has given $1 million to this project.  The Nature Conservancy of Canada still needs to raise another $5 million to acquire the remaining 2200 hectares of this corridor.  The organization already has lined up multiple donors for this project.

 West Bragg Creek opens Three New Trails

On November 3, 2018 there was a grand opening to celebrate three new trails, The West Bragg Creek portion of the Great Trail, the new WBC Interpretive Trail and the WBC Provincial Recreational Area. For more information go to Bragg Creek Trails.

The Winter Permit System at Glacier National Park

Winter Permit System will soon be in effect for 2018 – 2019 season. If you are skiing or snowboarding in Glacier National Park often, you will need a annual winter pass.The winter permit system at Glacier National Park is divide into Three Areas:

  1. Winter Unrestricted areas – open to vistors all winter
  2. Winter Restricted Areas – areas are open and closed daily, vistors need a winter permit and a national pass
  3. Winter Prohibited Areas – areas closed to vistors all winter

You need to check daily what areas are open. For more information go to Parks Canada – Glacier Winter Areas.

The official beginning of the regular season at Canmore Nordic Provincial Park starts Saturday November 17, 2018

Avalanche Training Courses

Yamnuska Mountain Adventures is offering avalanche skill training and the principles of winter backcountry travel.  The organization is Avalanche Canada AST provider. They offer courses in Canmore/Banff and Calgary. For more information go to Yamnuska Mountain Adventures, Avalanche Course.

X-Country Ski and Snowshoe Courses

University of Calgary Outdoor Club is offering different levels of x-country ski courses from beginners to refresher courses.  You can rent x-country ski equipment from the u of c outdoor club as well. If you take a x-country ski course with this organization then you can receive a 10% per cent discount on x-country ski equipment rentals. The same applies for snowshoeing. Go to the attached link and search for snowshoeing. For more information go to UCalgary Outdoor Adult Active Living.

November is CPR month

Hopefully you will never have to use CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation).  To have this skill in case a fellow hiker, snowshoer, x-countryskier, family member or a friend needs your help is a life saver. Many work places now offer courses thru the organization’s wellness plans, plus there is outside organizations that offer CPR.  Interesting Fact:  Did you know that the Bee Gees, Abba, Justin Bieber, Adel and many more have an instrumental role in CPR??!!!  Their songs are used for counting the 100 beats needed to perform CPR!. There is a total of 47 songs. The Bee Gees,Staying Alive, is the number one song.

 Nature Calgary Speaker Series

Speaker Series November 21 7.30pm to 9.30pm will feature Hannah Lucas from Oceanbridge.  Hannah also works full time at the Calgary Zoo. Presentation is on “How the Oceanbridge program is engaging youth across Canada to actively participate in waterway and ocean health and education.”   For more information go to Nature Calgary’s Speaker Series 

Trailhead Parking Security

It has been reported that car break-ins and theft has been happening at trail-head parking lots. Be sure to lock up your belongings and ensure nothing is visible when you leave your vehicle to mitigate the visibility of tempting items for thieves.

Trail Closures

Contest

A contest to encourage member readership of the CORE newsletter was started in August and will continue for the September, October and November issues. There will be a prize awarded at the the CORE Christmas party in November. Each month, there will be a quiz question related to some clue buried within the newsletter. Collect all four clues to participate in the contest at the Christmas Party (November 27), and winners names will be put in a draw for a prize. The Executive has put aside a MEC gift certificate, so stay tuned, folks.

 

 

Eligibility:

  • Must be a CORE member
  • Cannot be a member of the Executive (insider knowledge etc.)
  • Must be in attendance at the CORE Christmas Party

November Newsletter clue: “What are the three types of traction devices to help you, in winter hiking?” The answer is in the “Hither and Yon” section of the November Newsletter.

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Members Corner 

The Members Corner section of the CORE Newsletter is meant to allow CORE Members to connect with other members of like interest, or to seek or sell outdoor equipment. Please submit any request to mailbox@corehike.org and include your contact info for interested parties to contact you. No photo’s of items will be posted on CORE newsletter. Also, please keep your words to a minimum (50 words or less).  Please note that the CORE Newsletter is in the public domain, and that by submitting a request, you give permission to CORE to publish your contact information thus provided. CORE will not act as intermediary in any resulting transactions. All members who submit any request have relinquished CORE from any and all liabilities, claims, suits, and causes of action, and property (including loss of use or damage) on the part of the CORE club (individually or collectively).

{member’s AD and contact info to be posted here}

 

Adventure Stories

  For all CORE members, this spot is for you. If you have a little story to tell about something you’ve seen on a CORE outing, or some article or book you may have read that you would like to share, please send it along and we’ll publish it in the next newsletter. Keep it to a couple paragraphs, and stick to topics related to the outdoors or the environment.  mailbox@corehike.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hither and Yon

Winter Hiking

You Do Not Need to Stop Hiking in Winter!

Winter Hikers use three different kinds of traction devices, micro spikes, mountaineering crampons and snowshoes. Micro spikes and mountaineering crampons are used to provide traction on ice and packed snow. Snowshoes are used mainly to provide floatation on top of the surface snow. Micro spikes are used on fairly level hiking trails covered with packed snow or ice. And on steep slopes only packed with snow.  They provide extra traction that you need when your boot treads are no longer giving you traction. Mountaineering Crampons are used when you are on a higher angle that is ice or ice covered rocks or a mixture of ice and snow. That is when the longer and sharper traction aids are helpful. Micro spikes have too much give and the spikes are too short to penetrate deeply into ice when you need the device to hold your weight.

Snowshoe Anyone

Snowshoes are to keep you from sinking as deeply in the snow, as you would if you walked on top of the snow. Snow shoes also, help you conserve your energy. You do not have to pull yourself out of holes when you sink to your hips or waist. Snowshoes have crampons on the underside that provides the traction on snow or ice.  CORE member Carol had written an exceptional article in a previous CORE newsletter, on Snowshoes sizing, bindings, traction and heel lifts. With a video on further snowshoe tips. Plus, an article on different types of micro spikes and their uses. I have copied Carol’s article below.

 

 

 

 

Snowshoe Sizing

Snowshoe size is a key factor in getting the right amount of flotation. Generally, the heavier the person or the lighter and drier the snow, the more snowshoe surface area is required. Snowshoe size also depends on the type of activity you intend to do. For deep powder, a longer, wider snowshoe would be the most effective, but heavier and more tiring to use. Keep in mind that on CORE snowshoeing trips you are often on a trail where someone else has already “broken trail,” in which case you can use a smaller, narrower snowshoe – much easier and less tiring.

Men’s vs Women’s Gear 

Men’s snowshoes are designed to accommodate larger boots and heavier loads. For example, aluminum-frame snowshoes come in multiple sizes, usually 8″ x 25″, 9″ x 30″ and 10″ x 36″ or something similar. Women’s snowshoes tend to feature narrower, more contoured frame designs and sizes down to 8″ x 21″. Their bindings are sized to fit women’s footwear.

Easy-to-Fasten Bindings 

Make sure the bindings fit the boots you are going to be wearing, and that the fasteners are heavy duty (so they won’t break) and easy to secure and adjust.

Boa System for Bindings

By turning a wheel, a cable tightens evenly throughout the entire binding and heel for a secure fit. The binding also releases easily, making snowshoes with a Boa closure system one of the most user-friendly bindings.

Snowshoe Traction Devices 

Snowshoes for rolling or mountain terrain will come with toe crampons that rotate under the front of your foot to aid in climbing hills. Heel crampons are in a V shape and slow you down when descending hills. Look for both for casual snowshoeing in the Rockies. Some more rugged snowshoes may also have side rails (also called traction bars) to prevent slipping when crossing steep slopes.

Heel lifts

Also known as climbing bars, these are wire bails that can be flipped up under your heels to relieve calf strain on steep uphill sections and save energy on long ascents.

Watch this YouTube video , Tripper Girl for some further useful snowshoeing tips.

Another snowshoe tip blog is from hiking with Barry.

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OUTDOOR TRACTION DEVICES:

Highly Recommended by CORE for Winter Hikes and Outings

Kahtoola MICROspikes:

Cheryl with MICROspikes

Although the Kahtoola MICROspikes ($79 at MEC – November 2018) are perhaps a bit too aggressive for regular around-town sidewalk use, they are a good choice for all-purpose go-to option for longer hikes in mixed snow and icy conditions. Despite heavy use and abuse on everything from frozen streets to icy backcountry trails, they perform flawlessly and are incredibly durable. As a further testament, Backpacker magazine awarded the MICROspikes one of their 2012 Editors’ Choice Gold Awards, which honors exceptional outdoor gear that has withstood the test of time. As of 2018 Kathtoola micro spikes are still ranked in the top three for winter hiking.

 ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip:

The ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip ($49 at MEC, $55 at Atmosphere – November 2018) are a slightly different, slightly less aggressive take on the MICROspikes. They slip on using a similar stretchy rubber harness system, but instead of short, sharp vertical teeth underfoot, they use a lower-profile multi-toothed chain for grip. The ice trekkers diamond grip have some excellent reviews and are still in the top 5 for microspikes.

ICE trekkers Diamond Grip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hillsound Trail Crampon Traction Device:

The Hillsound Trail Crampon Traction Device ($65 at MEC, $65 at Atmosphere) They are lightweight which makes it easier to walk on ice and snow, has superior traction and stability and helps reduce muscle fatigue.  These Crampons feature a ergonomic plate system that stretch to fit with the sole of the boot. And elastic elastomer to stretch over top of the boot with an added strap to keep device secure.

 

Hillsound Trail Crampon

 

 

TIP: When buying any outdoor traction device, make sure that you buy them large enough to fit the boots that you will be wearing most often when using the spikes or cleats (which could be a size larger than your walking shoes).

 

 

 

 

 

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….see you on the trails …

Jane