EXECUTIVE CORNER

Recent Shuffle of Executive Members

CORE members, Stu C., Pat R., and Carol M. were all elected to new positions on the executive at our July monthly meeting. Stu will be holding down two positions: Webmaster and Membership; Pat has moved into the vacant Executive Trip Coordinator position (she is the person who will be collecting trip reports, going forward) and Carol will now “wear two hats”: Presentations and Communications.

Handing in Trip Reports

If you coordinate events and trips, you need to fill in a trip report and, either scan it and email it to mailbox@corehike.org or hand it to the Exec Trip Coordinator at a future meeting. The reports track member participation on hikes and are entered into Project Yodel, the club’s long-standing database which provides useful statistics at the end of each year.

Waterton National Park Hiking Weekend – September 1 – 4 

If you would like further details about the weekend being planned for CORE members on the Labour Day weekend, please check the CORE calendar and contact the coordinator, Anne-Marie, if you would like further information. Currently there are at least 13 members signed up, and some hikes have now been posted.

Here’s how to upload photos

Basically, you click on “Activities” on the home page, then “Photo Album.” You then have to login by selecting “My Albums” in the Fotki top toolbar, using “corehike” as the username and the same password you use to access the calendar. Open the CORE 2017 Photo Album. Click on “Create a New Album” found on the left hand side. A screen will appear where you can fill in the title, description and the day, month and year that the photos were taken (an important step, so don’t skip it). Scroll down and click on “Create Album.” From the folder where you have your photos stored on your computer, you can now “drag and drop” your photos to the Fotki Drag and Drop Window. If you want to add captions, click on “Edit” under each thumbnail. Or you can add captions as file names in your photos on your computer BEFORE you drag them over. This will automatically make captions when uploaded to Fotki. Be sure to save your changes.

If you’re still not sure how to do it, there are some instructions on the website, complete with screen shots to make the process clearer. Please go to CORE’s homepage (www.corehike.org) and click on Guides, then Photo Management and look for the link “How to Upload CORE Photos,” located in the second paragraph on the page.

 

Chicken

New Way to Collect Chicken Mountain Award Stories

Have you been on a CORE trip lately that went “a fowl” or where something unusual occurred along the trail? Well, now you don’t have to wait until the AGM to nominate a candidate for the Chicken Mountain Award. Just send your story to mailbox@corehike.org while it’s still fresh in your mind, and the executive will gather the stories together for the end of the year.

Canmore Wild Smart Program – Living “Smart” with Wildlife

Want to learn more about bear awareness and bear closures in the Bow Valley? Then visit the website of the Canmore Wild Smart Program by clicking on this link:  http://www.wildsmart.ca/

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July/August 2017

Between July 22 and August 12, CORE’s calendar featured 9 hikes, two urban walks, one biking event, a social dining evening and a slo-pitch practice. Waterfalls, fire lookouts, and amazing views were the main highlights of the hikes. We would like to thank the following coordinators for posting these events: Pat, Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Anne-Marie, Cliona, Cheryl, Dave V., Carol, and Mike.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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July 23 Bovine Road Block - Dyson Falls

July 23 – Bovine Road Block – Dyson Falls

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July 24 Cliona and the Chicken on Mount Hunter

July 24 – Cliona and the Chicken on Mount Hunter

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July 29 Twin Falls in Yoho

July 29 – Twin Falls in Yoho

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July 30 Legacy Trail Bikers

July 30 – Legacy Trail Bikers Taking a Break

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August 2 - Harvey, Geoff, Mike and Stu on West Wind Pass

August 2 – Harvey, Geoff, Mike and Stu on West Wind Pass

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August 3 - Ready to Play Ball - Pat and Carol

August 3 – Ready to Play Ball – Pat and Carol

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August 5 - Windtower Scramblers heading up hill

August 5 – Windtower Scramblers heading up

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August 6 - Lynn ponders best route on Burstall Pa

August 6 – Lynn ponders best route on Burstall Pass Trail

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Picnic on the ridge

August 12 – Hailstone Butte: Picnic on the Ridge

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AUGUST MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 29 August, 2017, 7:00 pm

Presentation: One Bicycle vs. the Russian Wilderness

Sean Nichols in Russoa

Another Cog in the Wheel

One of the world’s last great unbroken wilderness regions, the Russian taiga stretches nearly 10,000 km from the Pacific Ocean to the historic cities and palaces of Eastern Europe. Until recently the only way across this vast boreal forest was by train: the fabled Trans-Siberian Railway. But with the opening of a new road, it is now possible to traverse this landscape by car, or like Sean Nichols did in 2016, by bicycle. Join Sean as he recounts his adventures crossing the forests, plains, mountains and lakes of Russia from Siberia to Tatarstan and places in between. And along the way discover how to deal with the obstacles such a journey presents – from flat tyres to encounters with wildlife, mosquitos and perhaps the biggest obstacle of all: the formidable Russian Bureaucracy!

The meeting will also include club announcements, updates and a short slideshow from the Name That Flower contest. Winner will be announced.

Note: Our September meeting will feature Tony and Gillean Daffern, the well-known and popular writers of Kananaskis Country Trail Guide series. Tony has also penned Popular Day Hikes 2, as well as Backcountry Avalanche Safety. The presentation will include a review of the new Trailfinder application that the Dafferns have developed and a general/casual discussion of trails by Gillean.

“NATURE” NEWS & NOTES

Saskatoon Berries

Saskatoon berries are native to Alberta. The Plains Indians ate the fruit both fresh and dried in their dietary staple, pemmican. These berries are dark purple when ripe, tart and sweet with a slight almond flavour, and make excellent jams, preserves and pies. The mid-to-tall sized bush has small green leaves and sports white flowers in the spring. The berries grow in clusters along the stems; harvesting the high ones may require the help of a small step ladder.

Bison Return to Banff

Plains bison have returned to Banff National Park for the first time in more than a century. Coinciding with Canada’s 150th anniversary, bison returned to Banff’s Panther River Valley on February 1. For thousands of years, plains bison roamed the plains of North America. Their numbers were as high as 30 million, but bison nearly went extinct in the 19th Century, due to overhunting and slaughter. As migratory grazers, bison wandered into the mountains in the Bow Valley, but haven’t been present in more than 140 years, before the park’s creation in 1885. This year’s reintroduction program saw 10 pregnant females and six bulls brought from Elk Island National Park. Fittingly, on Earth Day (April 22), the first bison calf was born into the herd, with more young ones born in the following days and weeks.

Total Solar Eclipse

A total solar eclipse – the aligning of the Sun, Moon and Earth – will occur on August 21. The total phase will not be visible in Calgary, but can be observed as a partial solar eclipse here. It will be at its maximum at 11:33 a.m., so get out your pinhole camera and enjoy the spectacle; the last one was 1979.

A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

A Bird's Eye View

Viewing the world from the heights of Mt. Hunter

One of the hikes posted in July was the Mt. Hunter Lookout hike in Yoho National Park (July 24). Requiring a long drive from Calgary, this hike has been posted very few times during CORE’s 17-year history (in fact there is no listing for the hike in the club database). Six members and one guest (along with the Chicken) met at the trailhead (at the entrance to the Wapta Falls road). After safely crossing the Trans Canada Highway, the group headed up the trail, anticipating the chance to visit not one, but two fire lookouts.

Upper Lookout Keeper's Cabin

Lookout Keeper’s Cabin

Although the sites have not been manned for years, the lookout keepers’ cabins are still standing and serve as shelters during inclement weather. After 3.5 kilometres and 425 metres, we reached the first lookout site and stopped for lunch. Geoff and Harvey tried to climb the fire tower, but soon discovered it wasn’t safe. The upper lookout site was reached after lunch, 400 metres above the lower site. There we inspected the upper lookout keeper’s cabin, which was very quaint and rustic. The 800-900 metre elevation gain was worth it, as views were rewarding, and provided vistas of the surrounding mountains and the broad open valley to the south where the Kicking Horse and Beaverfoot Rivers meet. A good day was had by all!

 

ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Crunched for time?

Adding bursts of speed to walking workouts can give you positive benefit in less time

An Excerpt from the Calgary Herald – Written by Jill Barker

“It’s cheap, good for your health and easy to do, but just how fit do you get from your weekly walks around your neighbourhood?

Generally, improving your fitness level requires a workout intense enough to make your heart and lungs work harder. So if your walk is more of a stroll, chances are your cardiovascular system isn’t being challenged enough to become stronger and more efficient.

This doesn’t mean your walk is for naught. Walkers tend to go for distance rather than speed, which is exercise enough to improve health. Study after study has proven that walking reduces many of the risk factors related to cardiovascular disease like high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and stress, as well as reducing the risk of developing several types of cancer.

In a time-crunched world, though, it would be great if walkers could reap those benefits plus improve their fitness in less time…

…. Looking to create a walking program with all the values of walking, but with more bang for the buck, a Japanese research team devised an interval workout that takes half the time of traditional walking programs. It’s composed of five sets of three-minute bouts of low-intensity walking followed by three minutes of high-intensity walking (performed at an effort of at least seven on a scale of 10) for a minimum of four days per week. The total workout lasts about 30 minutes – half of which is performed at a high-intensity level.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM