Newsletters

November CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Mountain Equipment Co-0p Discount Night for CORE members 

Thursday, November 23, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Start your Christmas Shopping Early!

Please bring your CORE membership card to MEC (830 – 10 Avenue S.W.) to receive a wristband and be eligible for a 10% discount on all your purchases that evening.  At 7:30, there will be a short winter layering and clothing demonstration.  Coordinators for the evening are David and Edna. If you have any questions, please consult the CORE calendar for their contact information.

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Peterman Fund X-Country Ski Lessons 

The executive is arranging for X-C ski lessons for CORE members in January. This training will be partially paid for by the Branko Peterman Endowment Fund. Please watch the CORE calendar for details.

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Getting Ready for Winter Adventures

The club is currently gearing up for a winter season of snowshoeing, x-country skiing and hopefully downhill skiing. In the next few days more trips will be added to the calendar, but members are invited and encouraged to post additional events, outings and activities for CORE. Please contact Pat, our Executive Trip Coordinator, if you have any questions about coordinating or if you would like to co-coordinate with an experienced coordinator. Her email address is listed on the Executive Contact page; click on the Resources tab on the website (second item from the bottom on the drop down menu).

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UPDATE: December 1- 3 Annual Christmas Weekend at Castle Mountain Chalets

With the holiday season approaching, so is our annual Christmas weekend at Castle Mountain chalets, December 1st to 3rd. There are already 16 of us signed up. There is both a snowshoe and a cross-country ski outing scheduled for each day. We will do appetizers on Friday evening around 7:00 p.m. in the adjacent chalets and our traditional potluck is scheduled for Saturday evening. People coming for the day from Calgary are welcome to join in. The four rooms in the adjacent chalets are taken, so new reservations should be made directly with Castle Mountain chalets. Do not forget to mention the 20% discount for CORE members. Looking forward to a great weekend.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

October/November 2017

Here are a few highlights from the CORE calendar for October 22 to November 12. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

October 22 – Canoe Meadows to Widow Maker hike

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October 28 – Terrace Trail South

 

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October 31 – Hallowe’en Pumpkin Creations

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November 5 – Winter hiking at Glenbow Ranch

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November 11 – Johnston Canyon Upper Falls

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November 11 – Chicken Checking Trail Sign

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November 12 – Hiking the Friendship Trail

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NOVEMBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY, November 28, 2017, 7:00 pm

Annual Christmas Meeting and Party

All members are invited to our Annual Christmas Meeting and Party, our final meeting for 2017. The evening will begin with a special program — a slideshow of winter activities from the past few years followed by “CORE’s Got Talent,” featuring a performance by the talented CORE executive.

You’ll be invited to reveal your talents during a Christmas quiz (and perhaps win a prize). The night will end with a Christmas fete (a delectable buffet, ample Christmas cheer and festive music) to put everyone in the Christmas mood. This year, we’ll be serving drinks and munchies during our official program, after which the full buffet and social festivities will begin.

We are hoping for as many members as possible to come together for our last social of the year to celebrate the Christmas season and mingle with your fellow hikers, so be sure to come along and join in the fun.

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NATURE NEWS & NOTES

Raccoon-spotting in Banff – a Rare Thing, Indeed!

Raccoon eating corn

Did you know that raccoons are not normally seen in Banff National Park? This fall a raccoon was spotted in the Banff townsite which prompted Parks Canada to begin tracking the animal on remote cameras. The problem, according to Parks Canada, is that the raccoon is not a native species in Banff and could cause damage to the ecosystem. Raccoons are normally found in southwestern Alberta. According to Alberta Fish and Wildlife, in the wild raccoons feed on fruits, nuts, berries and insects, and foods that can be found near water such as fish, birds, eggs and frogs. They are omnivores that can easily adapt to whatever food sources are available

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

Another Year Older

This month CORE turns 18, a mere teenager in comparison to other clubs that have been around for a number of decades, such as the Calgary Ski Club, the Rocky Mountain Ramblers and the Calgary Weekend Hikers.

Since 1999, CORE has had it share of growing pains, as it evolved from its infancy into an adolescent. Some of the attributes that have kept CORE going are: dedicated coordinators, friendships that have developed, the adventures that have nourished our spirits, and the sense of community and commonality that comes from spending time in nature. Let’s hope that we can grow strong and tall as we approach adulthood in two years. And still be going strong when we turn 30.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Will 2017-2018 be a “La Nina” year?

La Niña means The Little Girl in Spanish. La Niña is also sometimes called El Viejoanti-El Niño, or simply “a cold event.

The impacts of La Niña on the global climate tend to be opposite those of El Niño. During a La Niña year, winter temperatures are warmer than normal in the southeast and cooler than normal in the northwest. La Niña usually brings colder winters to the Canadian west and Alaska, and drier, warmer weather to the American southeast.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists are “predicting” that a La Niña will form this winter, but this is not a certainty. Right now, they’re saying there’s a 55-65 percent chance. For it to officially be a La Niña year, the sea surface temperature needs to hold at least 0.5 degrees below average for three months.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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October CORE newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

On-line Membership Sign-up and Electronic Payment Now Up & Running

Next time you want to renew your CORE membership, you will be able to do so on-line, using your credit card or PayPal. Thanks to invaluable help from CORE member Steve Hashman, we now have on-line membership sign-up and payment capability. Check out the new on-line form and waiver on the Join Now page.

Upcoming CORE Presentations for 2018

Join us at the Scarboro Community Centre for the following presentations in the New Year:

January 30 – Snowshoeing 101 – Justin Howse from Norseman Ski Shop will give a comprehensive talk on snowshoe equipment, snowshoeing techniques and safety while snowshoeing.

March 27 – Author Dale Leckie will give a slideshow on his new book, Rocks, Rivers and Ridges – Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho and Jasper National Park.

April 24 – CORE member, Mike G., will share his recent trips to Egypt, Greece and Turkey.

June 26 – (tentatively) – CORE member, Jeanette N., will share her recent travels in Cambodia.

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December 1- 3 Annual Christmas Weekend at Castle Mountain Chalets

For the past four or five years, CORE members have been gathering in the mountains on the first weekend in December for an early Christmas get together. Over the weekend, we snowshoe, cross country ski and downhill ski. More adventurous members have been known to back country ski. Check the CORE calendar for more details about the weekend. Over the coming weeks, the activities will be posted with further information.

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Discount for CORE members at Norseman Ski and Hike Shop

CORE members are currently entitled to show their membership cards at the Norseman Ski and Hike Shop on 37 Street S.W. and get a 10% discount on hiking and skiing apparel and equipment. There may be some restrictions to this offer, such as no discount on sale items, etc. This offer is definitely good for the rest of 2017, and may be extended into 2018.

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

September/October 2017

Between September 11 and October 22, CORE’s calendar featured eight hikes, one bike & hike, three urban hikes, one potluck picnic hike, and a social dining evening.  Thanks to the following coordinators for posting these events: Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Carol, Cathie, John, Cliona, Cheryl, Kiyoko and Sarah.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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September 16 – Annual Memorial Hike

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September 23 –  A snowy day at Upper Meadow (Burstall Pass)

 

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September 23 – CORE gang on Powderface and Prairie Creek Loop

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September 24 – Brilliant blues and autumn foliage of Glenmore Reservoir

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September 24 – Kiyoko and her group on Wasootch Ridge

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September 26 – Pat with Gillean and Tony Daffern after CORE meeting

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September 28 – Happy hikers on 12 Mile Coulee urban walk

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September 30 – Spectacular view of Hailstone Butte from Windy Peak

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October 9 – Getting ready to hike Jack Hill and Jill Hill

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October 22 – Roasting sausages over the fire

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OCTOBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 31 October, 2017, 7:00 pm

Halloween Potluck, Party and Pumpkins!

Halloween Party

Join us at 7:00 p.m. at the Scarboro Community Centre for a Halloween Celebration featuring an Appetizer Potluck, Pumpkin Carving and Decorating, and Music for your listening and dancing pleasure! Beverages will be provided by CORE. Please bring a contribution to the potluck (e.g., appetizers, finger food, munchies, sandwiches, desserts, Halloween treats). Also, bring your own pumpkin, then put on your creative cap and take part in the pumpkin decorating and/or carving event.  CORE will supply lots of decorating materials but you are welcome to bring your own. CORE will also provide four pumpkins for those who are not able to bring their own.  If you prefer to carve your pumpkin, don’t forget your carving tools! We encourage everyone to wear at least one Halloween accessory, or a full costume, or wear black and orange.

 

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NATURE NEWS & “NOTES”

SNOWSHOES:

Come to our January 30 meeting to hear Justin Howse of the Norseman Ski Shop talk about snowshoes, and how to buy the right type. In the meantime, here are some tips for choosing snowshoes for your winter outings.

Cheryl and Katherine

Snowshoe Sizing

Snowshoe size is a key factor in getting the right amount of flotation. Generally, the heavier the person or the lighter and drier the snow, the more snowshoe surface area is required. Snowshoe size also depends on the type of activity you intend to do. For deep powder, a longer, wider snowshoe would be the most effective, but heavier and more tiring to use. Keep in mind that on CORE snowshoeing trips you are often on a trail where someone else has already “broken trail,” in which case you can use a smaller, narrower snowshoe – much easier and less tiring.

Men’s vs Women’s Gear 

Men’s snowshoes are designed to accommodate larger boots and heavier loads. For example, aluminum-frame snowshoes come in multiple sizes, usually 8″ x 25″, 9″ x 30″ and 10″ x 36″ or something similar. Women’s snowshoes tend to feature narrower, more contoured frame designs and sizes down to 8″ x 21″. Their bindings are sized to fit women’s footwear.

Easy-to-Fasten Bindings 

Make sure the bindings fit the boots you are going to be wearing, and that the fasteners are heavy duty (so they won’t break) and easy to secure and adjust.

Snowshoe Traction Devices 

Snowshoes for rolling or mountain terrain will come with toe crampons that rotate under the front of your foot to aid in climbing hills. Heel crampons are in a V shape and slow you down when descending hills. Look for both for casual snowshoeing in the Rockies. Some more rugged snowshoes may also have side rails (also called traction bars) to prevent slipping when crossing steep slopes.

Heel lifts

Also known as climbing bars, these are wire bails that can be flipped up under your heels to relieve calf strain on steep uphill sections and save energy on long ascents.

Watch this YouTube video for some further useful snowshoeing tips.

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OUTDOOR TRACTION DEVICES:

Highly Recommended by CORE for Winter Hikes and Outings

Kahtoola MICROspikes:

Cheryl with MICROspikes

Although the Kahtoola MICROspikes ($85 at MEC – October 2017) are perhaps a bit too aggressive for regular around-town sidewalk use, they are a good choice for all-purpose go-to option for longer hikes in mixed snow and icy conditions. Despite heavy use and abuse on everything from frozen streets to icy backcountry trails, they perform flawlessly and are incredibly durable. As a further testament, Backpacker magazine awarded the MICROspikes one of their 2012 Editors’ Choice Gold Awards, which honors exceptional outdoor gear that has withstood the test of time.

 ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip:

A more recent entry into the field, the ICE Trekkers Diamond Grip ($49 at MEC, $55 at Atmosphere – October 2017) are a slightly different, slightly less aggressive take on the MICROspikes. They slip on using a similar stretchy rubber harness system, but instead of short, sharp vertical teeth underfoot, they use a lower-profile multi-toothed chain for grip. This will be the third season they’ve been available and they have been garnering some excellent reviews.

ICEtrekkers Diamond Grip

YakTrax Extreme (XTR) Ice Cleats:

Yaktrax XTR Ice Cleats ($29.99 at Sport Check and Atmosphere – October 2017) provide good traction on snow and ice. Their spike design enhances traction while preventing snow build up with its unique anti-snow pack plate. They appear to be a lighter, less heavy-duty version of MICROspikes, with 10 spikes on the bottom, as opposed to 12 on the MICROspikes.  They have good and bad reviews on Amazon; one reviewer says that they are not sized correctly.

TIP: When buying any outdoor traction device, make sure that you buy them large enough to fit the boots that you will be wearing most often when using the spikes or cleats (which could be a size larger than your walking shoes).

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ARTICLES & BOOKS and WEBSITES WORTH NOTING

The most underrated endurance workout? Hiking.

“There’s something special about moderately paced movement through nature that leaves one feeling refreshed, renewed, and satisfied. Because of that, hiking is rarely considered a sport in the same way as trail running or mountain biking, both of which are more acutely painful and taxing on the body. And yet recent studies show that a walk in the woods—especially at the right tempo—is a superb way to build endurance and strength.”

For a study published earlier this year in the journal PLOS One, a team of researchers affiliated with the University of Innsbruck in Austria had individuals complete two three-hour workouts under distinct conditions. The first was a “fast walk” on an indoor treadmill; the second was an outdoor hike through mountains. In the treadmill condition, the incline settings were contrived to mimic the outdoor route as closely as possible, so that the physical strain of both scenarios would be similar. (The researchers could not force the treadmills to decline, so outdoor downhill segments became indoor flat segments.)

During and immediately following both workouts, the researchers collected physiological and psychological measures. What they found is interesting, a bit paradoxical, and fully in support of hiking.

For starters, participants pushed themselves harder during the outdoor hike, as evidenced by heart rates that were, on average, six beats per minute higher. Given this, you’d think the participants would have experienced the outdoor hike as more tiring and perhaps less enjoyable. But the opposite occurred: They reported increased feelings of pleasure both during and immediately following the outdoor hike, and they said they felt less fatigued afterward. Put differently, going hard while hiking in nature feels easier than going hard indoors.

(Sourced from the Alpine Club of Canada, Calgary Section Newsletter)

Tony and Gillean Daffern’s New Trailfinder Application

At our September meeting, Tony and Gillean Daffern, author and publisher of Kananaskis Trail Guides, introduced their new website which features their Trailfinder application. It’s worth checking out if you are looking for maps and information on trails.

http://kananaskistrails.com/trailfinder/trailfinder.html

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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September CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Seeking Ideas for Courses

The CORE executive is currently looking for ideas from the members about educational courses they would like to see in the future. If you have a suggestion for a course or courses that could be funded by the legacy Branko Peterman fund, please send your idea(s) to mailbox@corehike. org.

Stories are Coming in for Chicken Mountain Award (the CMA)

We now have two stories that have been submitted via mailbox@corehike.org for the Chicken Mountain Award. These, and other stories submitted to the mailbox over the year, will be revealed at the club’s AGM in May, where a winner of the award will be selected.

Progress is being made on On-line Membership Sign-up and Payment Capabilities

As announced at our August meeting, the executive is working to set up an on-line membership form and payment system to make membership renewal easier and more convenient. Stay tuned for further details!

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ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

August/September 2017

Between August 19 and September 10, CORE’s calendar featured four different cycling events (mountain biking, road biking to the Gopher Hole Museum, urban biking around the entire city and city pathway biking through various parks). Also on the calendar were seven hikes in the mountains, two urban hikes, and a social dining evening.  Thanks to the following coordinators for posting these events: Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Anne-Marie, Dave V., Carol, and Cathie.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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August 19 – Pigeon Mountain Summit

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August 20 – Carol and Kiyoko – Outnumbered

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August 26 – Distant View from Sulphur Springs

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Sept. 2 – Heading off to hike the Wall Lake trail

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Sept. 2- Anne-Marie on Carthew Alderson trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sept. 3 – Goat Haunt Group (Shoreline Hike)

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Sept. 3 – Bald Eagle seen from Waterton Tour Boat

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Sept. 6 – Mei, Geoff and Harvey embark on a long bike ride

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Sept. 10 – Signal Hill – Tuscany Biking group

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SEPTEMBER MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 26 September, 2017, 7:00 pm

Presentation: Authors and hikers Gillean and Tony Daffern – Kananaskis Country Trail Guide Series

Join us at 7:00 p.m. at the Scarboro Community Centre for a presentation by experienced hikers and authors Gillean and Tony Daffern. Gillean and Tony are the popular and well-known writers and publishers of the series, Kananaskis Country Trail Guides. Tony has also penned, Popular Dayhikes 2: Canadian Rockies as well as Backcountry Avalanche Safety. The presentation will include a review of the new Trailfinder on-line application, that Tony and Gillean have developed. Following that, Gillean will answer any questions we may have or discuss issues regarding the Kananaskis trails that we would like to raise. Here’s your chance to interact with the experts on K-Country.

The meeting will also include club announcements and updates.

Our October meeting, Tuesday, October 31, will land right on Hallowe’en night. Watch for announcements regarding the possibility of pumpkins and potluck!

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“NATURE” NEWS & NOTES

Add Raw Cacao to Your Trail Mix

Did you know that you can add unroasted broken cacao beans (also known as cacao nibs) to trail mixes or as toppings on dishes and desserts? According to an article in Rockies Health (Summer 2017 edition), cacao in its unprocessed, unroasted state has 119 times more antioxidant content than bananas, 20 times more than blueberries and four times more than its processed counterpart, dark chocolate. In addition, raw cacao powder can be blended into smoothies and other beverages (such as hot chocolate). To find out where to buy these products just Google them. It looks like Amazon, Walmart, Bulk Barn may be potential sources.

Banff and Canmore’s Bear 148

For those of you who have been following the saga of Bear 148 over the summer, here’s an update. This well-known grizzly was relocated out of Canmore on July 28 following several encounters with people in a heavily-used area, and moved 450 kilometres to a remote area of northwestern Alberta. According to the Rocky Mountain Outlook (Canmore’s weekly newspaper), a new GPS collar tracking 148’s movements shows that she has been criss-crossing back and forth between drainages in Alberta and B.C. but generally staying in the same area where she was released. She is most likely foraging on huckleberries in those drainages, according to provincial government sources.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

A Bird's Eye View

Hiking in an extreme fire ban area – A new experience for CORE members

The CORE group who participated in the recent Waterton Hiking Weekend quickly found out what it’s like to hike in an area being shut down and restricted hour by hour, initially due to extreme fire hazard and tinder dry conditions, and later due to an actual fire west of the national park – the Kenow Mountain Wildfire. We knew that certain trails would be closed before we left, but by the time we arrived in Waterton on Friday evening, the closure list had grown substantially. With limited trails still open, we were lucky to find two great hikes to do on Saturday (although one of them, Wall Lake, had a closure sign by the time we finished the hike, and the second one was closed the following day).

On Sunday, we were worried that no trails would be open and we’d end up renting paddle boards and eating ice cream along with the rest of the tourists. Fortunately, we had all brought our passports, so we hopped on a tour boat heading to Goat Haunt on the U.S. side of Waterton Lake. When we arrived back from the long hike along the shoreline, there was a letter attached to our motel door. Although not an evacuation alert per se, the letter warned us of a potential alert in the future. Despite the many challenges that the group faced, it ended up being a great weekend. Thanks to Anne-Marie for organizing it!

The fire recently spread into Waterton National Park, burned down the park’s visitor centre, and many people have been evacuated from southern Alberta communities.

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ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

New Book Tackles the Complex Subject of Geology – Without Being Full of Technical Jargon

For those struggling to understand how the Rockies were made and shaped, there is a new book available that offers a friendly introduction to local geology. Primarily a driving guide, Rocks, Ridges, and Rivers: Geological Wonders of Banff, Yoho, and Jasper National Parks is a 216-page guidebook, published by Broken Poplars, and written by Calgary geologist Dale Leckie. Launched in Calgary at Shelf-Life Books on July 26, Leckie’s book focuses on the geology of the main highways of Banff, Yoho, and Jasper: specifically, the Trans-Canada from Banff to Field and the Icefields Parkway (Hwy 93 north) from Lake Louise to Jasper.

Leckie begins with the big picture, reaching back in time to explain how the Rockies developed, before moving on to the eight colour-coded geological road trips, which are accompanied by full-colour maps, diagrams and photographs (and some art work). Along with the geology, Leckie apparently touches on the history, as well as the natural history, of each site.

It is well-written, easy-to-use, informative and jargon-free. Watch for it in local bookstores such as Chapters or Shelf-Life Books, or on Amazon.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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August CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Recent Shuffle of Executive Members

CORE members, Stu C., Pat R., and Carol M. were all elected to new positions on the executive at our July monthly meeting. Stu will be holding down two positions: Webmaster and Membership; Pat has moved into the vacant Executive Trip Coordinator position (she is the person who will be collecting trip reports, going forward) and Carol will now “wear two hats”: Presentations and Communications.

Handing in Trip Reports

If you coordinate events and trips, you need to fill in a trip report and, either scan it and email it to mailbox@corehike.org or hand it to the Exec Trip Coordinator at a future meeting. The reports track member participation on hikes and are entered into Project Yodel, the club’s long-standing database which provides useful statistics at the end of each year.

Waterton National Park Hiking Weekend – September 1 – 4 

If you would like further details about the weekend being planned for CORE members on the Labour Day weekend, please check the CORE calendar and contact the coordinator, Anne-Marie, if you would like further information. Currently there are at least 13 members signed up, and some hikes have now been posted.

Here’s how to upload photos

Basically, you click on “Activities” on the home page, then “Photo Album.” You then have to login by selecting “My Albums” in the Fotki top toolbar, using “corehike” as the username and the same password you use to access the calendar. Open the CORE 2017 Photo Album. Click on “Create a New Album” found on the left hand side. A screen will appear where you can fill in the title, description and the day, month and year that the photos were taken (an important step, so don’t skip it). Scroll down and click on “Create Album.” From the folder where you have your photos stored on your computer, you can now “drag and drop” your photos to the Fotki Drag and Drop Window. If you want to add captions, click on “Edit” under each thumbnail. Or you can add captions as file names in your photos on your computer BEFORE you drag them over. This will automatically make captions when uploaded to Fotki. Be sure to save your changes.

If you’re still not sure how to do it, there are some instructions on the website, complete with screen shots to make the process clearer. Please go to CORE’s homepage (www.corehike.org) and click on Guides, then Photo Management and look for the link “How to Upload CORE Photos,” located in the second paragraph on the page.

 

Chicken

New Way to Collect Chicken Mountain Award Stories

Have you been on a CORE trip lately that went “a fowl” or where something unusual occurred along the trail? Well, now you don’t have to wait until the AGM to nominate a candidate for the Chicken Mountain Award. Just send your story to mailbox@corehike.org while it’s still fresh in your mind, and the executive will gather the stories together for the end of the year.

Canmore Wild Smart Program – Living “Smart” with Wildlife

Want to learn more about bear awareness and bear closures in the Bow Valley? Then visit the website of the Canmore Wild Smart Program by clicking on this link:  http://www.wildsmart.ca/

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

July/August 2017

Between July 22 and August 12, CORE’s calendar featured 9 hikes, two urban walks, one biking event, a social dining evening and a slo-pitch practice. Waterfalls, fire lookouts, and amazing views were the main highlights of the hikes. We would like to thank the following coordinators for posting these events: Pat, Lynn, Harvey, Julia, Anne-Marie, Cliona, Cheryl, Dave V., Carol, and Mike.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities.

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July 23 Bovine Road Block - Dyson Falls

July 23 – Bovine Road Block – Dyson Falls

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July 24 Cliona and the Chicken on Mount Hunter

July 24 – Cliona and the Chicken on Mount Hunter

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July 29 Twin Falls in Yoho

July 29 – Twin Falls in Yoho

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July 30 Legacy Trail Bikers

July 30 – Legacy Trail Bikers Taking a Break

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August 2 - Harvey, Geoff, Mike and Stu on West Wind Pass

August 2 – Harvey, Geoff, Mike and Stu on West Wind Pass

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August 3 - Ready to Play Ball - Pat and Carol

August 3 – Ready to Play Ball – Pat and Carol

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August 5 - Windtower Scramblers heading up hill

August 5 – Windtower Scramblers heading up

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August 6 - Lynn ponders best route on Burstall Pa

August 6 – Lynn ponders best route on Burstall Pass Trail

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Picnic on the ridge

August 12 – Hailstone Butte: Picnic on the Ridge

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AUGUST MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 29 August, 2017, 7:00 pm

Presentation: One Bicycle vs. the Russian Wilderness

Sean Nichols in Russoa

Another Cog in the Wheel

One of the world’s last great unbroken wilderness regions, the Russian taiga stretches nearly 10,000 km from the Pacific Ocean to the historic cities and palaces of Eastern Europe. Until recently the only way across this vast boreal forest was by train: the fabled Trans-Siberian Railway. But with the opening of a new road, it is now possible to traverse this landscape by car, or like Sean Nichols did in 2016, by bicycle. Join Sean as he recounts his adventures crossing the forests, plains, mountains and lakes of Russia from Siberia to Tatarstan and places in between. And along the way discover how to deal with the obstacles such a journey presents – from flat tyres to encounters with wildlife, mosquitos and perhaps the biggest obstacle of all: the formidable Russian Bureaucracy!

The meeting will also include club announcements, updates and a short slideshow from the Name That Flower contest. Winner will be announced.

Note: Our September meeting will feature Tony and Gillean Daffern, the well-known and popular writers of Kananaskis Country Trail Guide series. Tony has also penned Popular Day Hikes 2, as well as Backcountry Avalanche Safety. The presentation will include a review of the new Trailfinder application that the Dafferns have developed and a general/casual discussion of trails by Gillean.

“NATURE” NEWS & NOTES

Saskatoon Berries

Saskatoon berries are native to Alberta. The Plains Indians ate the fruit both fresh and dried in their dietary staple, pemmican. These berries are dark purple when ripe, tart and sweet with a slight almond flavour, and make excellent jams, preserves and pies. The mid-to-tall sized bush has small green leaves and sports white flowers in the spring. The berries grow in clusters along the stems; harvesting the high ones may require the help of a small step ladder.

Bison Return to Banff

Plains bison have returned to Banff National Park for the first time in more than a century. Coinciding with Canada’s 150th anniversary, bison returned to Banff’s Panther River Valley on February 1. For thousands of years, plains bison roamed the plains of North America. Their numbers were as high as 30 million, but bison nearly went extinct in the 19th Century, due to overhunting and slaughter. As migratory grazers, bison wandered into the mountains in the Bow Valley, but haven’t been present in more than 140 years, before the park’s creation in 1885. This year’s reintroduction program saw 10 pregnant females and six bulls brought from Elk Island National Park. Fittingly, on Earth Day (April 22), the first bison calf was born into the herd, with more young ones born in the following days and weeks.

Total Solar Eclipse

A total solar eclipse – the aligning of the Sun, Moon and Earth – will occur on August 21. The total phase will not be visible in Calgary, but can be observed as a partial solar eclipse here. It will be at its maximum at 11:33 a.m., so get out your pinhole camera and enjoy the spectacle; the last one was 1979.

A BIRD’S EYE VIEW

A Bird's Eye View

Viewing the world from the heights of Mt. Hunter

One of the hikes posted in July was the Mt. Hunter Lookout hike in Yoho National Park (July 24). Requiring a long drive from Calgary, this hike has been posted very few times during CORE’s 17-year history (in fact there is no listing for the hike in the club database). Six members and one guest (along with the Chicken) met at the trailhead (at the entrance to the Wapta Falls road). After safely crossing the Trans Canada Highway, the group headed up the trail, anticipating the chance to visit not one, but two fire lookouts.

Upper Lookout Keeper's Cabin

Lookout Keeper’s Cabin

Although the sites have not been manned for years, the lookout keepers’ cabins are still standing and serve as shelters during inclement weather. After 3.5 kilometres and 425 metres, we reached the first lookout site and stopped for lunch. Geoff and Harvey tried to climb the fire tower, but soon discovered it wasn’t safe. The upper lookout site was reached after lunch, 400 metres above the lower site. There we inspected the upper lookout keeper’s cabin, which was very quaint and rustic. The 800-900 metre elevation gain was worth it, as views were rewarding, and provided vistas of the surrounding mountains and the broad open valley to the south where the Kicking Horse and Beaverfoot Rivers meet. A good day was had by all!

 

ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Crunched for time?

Adding bursts of speed to walking workouts can give you positive benefit in less time

An Excerpt from the Calgary Herald – Written by Jill Barker

“It’s cheap, good for your health and easy to do, but just how fit do you get from your weekly walks around your neighbourhood?

Generally, improving your fitness level requires a workout intense enough to make your heart and lungs work harder. So if your walk is more of a stroll, chances are your cardiovascular system isn’t being challenged enough to become stronger and more efficient.

This doesn’t mean your walk is for naught. Walkers tend to go for distance rather than speed, which is exercise enough to improve health. Study after study has proven that walking reduces many of the risk factors related to cardiovascular disease like high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and stress, as well as reducing the risk of developing several types of cancer.

In a time-crunched world, though, it would be great if walkers could reap those benefits plus improve their fitness in less time…

…. Looking to create a walking program with all the values of walking, but with more bang for the buck, a Japanese research team devised an interval workout that takes half the time of traditional walking programs. It’s composed of five sets of three-minute bouts of low-intensity walking followed by three minutes of high-intensity walking (performed at an effort of at least seven on a scale of 10) for a minimum of four days per week. The total workout lasts about 30 minutes – half of which is performed at a high-intensity level.

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….see you on the trails ….

CM

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July 2017 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Executive Position Appointments

Several of the existing board members have volunteered to be nominated for dual roles on the executive. These open positions are:

  • Executive Trip Coordinator
  • Membership Coordinator
  • Communications Coordinator

Additional nominations will be accepted at the July 25 monthly meeting, and member approval will be requested.

Change in Password and Accessing Membership Applications

The CORE website/calendar password changed around June 20. Those members who have not had a chance to renew their membership can print off a form from the website and bring it to our July 25 monthly meeting or mail it to the address on the form.

To access a form on the website, go to “Joining” then click on “Membership Application Info”. Scroll down about 2/3 of the page to find downloadable forms.

Carpool Contribution Confusion

Some confusion seems to exist around CORE’s guidelines for contributing to your volunteer carpool driver. A few years ago, it was raised to $0.25 per kilometre (when gas price were “sky high”) but later it was dropped back to $0.20 per kilometre. To determine each passenger’s share of the carpooling contribution, use this formula: Total (return trip) kilometres multiplied by $0.20, divided by the number of people in the vehicle (including the driver). Please keep in mind that this formula is only a guideline, and that it is up to each driver to calculate a “reasonable” contribution for passengers. The complete carpooling guidelines are at this link.

CORE Photo Albums

Event coordinators, please encourage your group members to take photos of interesting scenery, flora/fauna and group shots along the way, and post a few in the CORE Photo Albums. Five to 10 photos of the best shots along the trail are probably adequate.

These photos are important because:

  • Photos show other CORE members, as well as the general public, what great outdoor adventures are happening each week, and thus promote the club
  • Photos help the person publishing the newsletter to include highlights from previous outings, as well as provide a great collection of photos that can be presented at the AGM
  • A lack of photo albums would look like we are having a pretty dull year

If you don’t know how to post your photos, there is a CORE webpage describing the process under the “Guides” menu button. Or you can ask any member of the CORE executive to give you a short tutorial.

Warning! 16 Avenue and Home Road N.W. Upgrades – Affecting Carpool Lot at end of Home Road

The City is making a number of improvements in the Montgomery community which will create a safer environment for those who live and travel in the area. These improvements mean lane closures and construction around the corner of Home Road and 16 Avenue, where we turn to access the carpool lot at the end of Home Road. At times, people may be delayed getting to the carpool lot and returning to the lot.

Anticipated completion date: End of October 2017

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

June/July 2017

Between June 3 and July 12, CORE’s calendar featured 16 different events that saw members lobbing balls on the tennis court, dining at Emma’s Cozy Kitchen, hiking in the city parks, hiking in the foothills, and heading up mountains on several occasions. We would like to thank the following coordinators for posting these events: Pat, Lynn, Fiona, Harvey, Julia, Jeanette, Ann-Marie, Stu, Cliona, Cheryl, Dave V., Carol, David T., Edna and John R.

CONGRATULATIONS to Edna, Julia Tsang, and Harvey for completing the Canmore Triple Crown Challenge on July 19, following their ascent of the East End of Rundle (EEOR)!

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities:

June 3 Tennis Ladies

June 3 Tennis Ladies

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June 17 Bow Valley Provincial Park

June 17 Bow Valley Provincial Park

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June 21 Bowmont Park urban hike

June 21 Bowmont Park urban hike

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June 25 Lunch at Ribbon Falls

June 25 Lunch at Ribbon Falls

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July 1 Canada Day in Kimberley

July 1 Canada Day in Kimberley

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June 29 Lady MacDonald Triple Crown Challenge

June 29 Lady MacDonald Triple Crown Challenge

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JULY MONTHLY MEETING

Scarboro Community Centre

1727 14th Avenue S.W.

TUESDAY. 25 July, 2017, 7:00 pm

Presentation: Wildflowers of Southern Alberta, keep Alberta wild!

Sweet Jacob's Ladder

Sweet Jacob’s Ladder

Join Julie Walker of Full Circle Adventures and learn how so many of our native wildflowers play a key role in the food forest for wildlife and humans. The plants of Southern Alberta are the key focus and the ecological influences that have affected them and how they are under threat by changes to the foothills landscape.

Julie has been an outdoor educator and guide for over 25 years in Southern Alberta and her company Full Circle Adventures has been running since 2004.

Prior to our guest presenter, we will spend a few minutes talking about CORE’s coming events, developments and issues, and we’ll also take a quick look at the results of the “Name that Flower” contest.

Note: Our August meeting will feature Sean Nichols who biked across Russia.

LOCAL “NATURE” NEWS & NOTES

Wild Alberta Roses

Wild Alberta Roses

Nose Hill Park

Did you know that there are brand new stairs in Nose Hill Park that take you up the hill from the Calgary Winter Club trailhead? The stairs make ascending and descending so much easier!

Also, early-mid July is a great time to see wildflowers blooming in Nose Hill Park. Spotted on July 16 and July 19 were the following plants: golden rod, harebells, different shades of fleabane, Alberta wild rose, yarrow, brown-eyed Susan, cinque foil, prairie thistle, sticky geraniums and some unidentified species, with an added bonus of ripening Saskatoon bushes.

Name that Flower Contest

We’ve got a pretty good collection of photos with flower names identified and these are posted in the CORE Photo Album. We’ve decided to extend the contest till the end of August, so please continue to take fauna photos on your hikes and post them in the CORE photo albums. Contest rules are at this link.

ARTICLES & BOOKS WORTH NOTING

Forest Therapy: Nature Decreases Stress & Boosts Your Immune System

By Ronna Schneberger, naturalist, guide and Shinrin Yoku Practitioner

In the 1980s, Japanese doctors started prescribing a type of Forest Therapy called Shinrin Yoku, which means ‘bathing in the atmosphere of the forest’. Shinrin Yoku is prescribed to decrease stress, boost memory and improve immune function.

Today, doctors in the U.S. and Canada are starting to follow suit, and scientific studies not only show how it works, they also show why it works.

Researchers studying the Shinrin Yoku in Japan discovered that trees give off organic chemical compounds called phytoncides, which are like a natural bug spray for trees. As people bathe in the atmosphere of the forest, they take in these phytoncides through their skin and as they breathe. These compounds have a powerful list of benefits to us, including reduced stress and improved memory.

Studies have shown that in a mere 15 minutes of forest walking you can reduce your stress hormone, cortisol, by 12%. In two hours, you can increase your memory and attention span by 20%. On top of that, participant blood pressure and heart rate lowered naturally.

….see you on the trails ….

CM

 

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Living With Wildlife by Filmmaker Leanne Allison

Living With Wildlife DocumentaryA number of CORE club members attended Friends of Kananaskis Trails Fest in June and chanced to see this little documentary film “Living with Wildlife” by Filmmaker Leanne Allison. The Bow Valley of AB is the busiest place in the world where people and grizzly bears still coexist. ‘Living with Wildlife’ is a 25 minute documentary that tells the hopeful story of how communities in the Bow Valley have come together over the past 20 years in order to coexist with grizzly bears and other wildlife.

You can view this film on the Necessary Journeys website along with some other documentaries and conservation shorts:

….enjoy and see you on the trails

Pat R. and Stu C. (for the CORE Executive)

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June 2017 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

CORE AGM and the New Executive for 2017-2018

CORE successfully held our AGM on May 30. We enjoyed a great slide show of highlights from the 2016-2017 year events, anointed a new bearer for the Chicken Mountain Award (Geoff Chidell will carry this honour for the coming year), partook of a fine spread of food and refreshments, and of course elected our new Executive which will steer us through the 2017-2018 year. The next Executive list is as below:

Chairperson – Julia Trangeled,  Co-Chairperson  – Jeanette Nelder, Secretary – Mary Macieyowski,    Treasurer – Craig Morris, Membership Coordinator – Mindy Woolcott, Executive Trip Coordinator – OPEN, Communications Coordinator (newsletter) – Pat Ranger, Presentations Coordinator – Carol Miyagawa, Webmaster – Stu Cox, Member-at-Large – Mietka Zieba

WANTED – One Executive Trip Coordinator

You may notice that we have one position unfilled, that of Executive Trip Coordinator. This is the person who mentors event leaders, monitors trip-related safety, collects the event leader trip reports and enters pertinent information into the trip report database. We have had someone in this position since CORE’s inception – it is a critical role, so please, if you have an interest in filling this position for the coming year, or if you can suggest someone whom we can approach, contact our new Chairperson Julia.

Membership Renewal

If you were a member for the 2016-2017 year, and haven’t renewed your membership yet but intend to do so, please download and complete your membership form, then mail the form and dues in to CORE (address on form) as soon as possible. As of June 15, ONLY paid up members will receive calendar event email alerts. Note that the membership forms can be downloaded from the Membership Application Page

The CORE members password will change on June 20, and if you are not a current paid-up member, you will no longer be able to access the CORE Events Calendar.

Attach your Membership Card to your Backpack

As hike leaders, we get to know a lot of the regular attendees of hikes and other outings. But new activity leaders may not know everybody, and members who don’t come out very often may not be known to the activity leader. If you don’t have your membership card with you, then you may be asked to sign a guest waiver.

Trip Reports

Event leaders, since we don’t have an Executive Trip Coordinator appointed yet, pleasescan and email your trip reports to mailbox@corehike.org , or hand them to a member of the CORE executive at a CORE month-end meeting.

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

April/May 2017

Summer is almost here, and many of our members have already participated in some great hikes, urban walks, tennis and bicycling trips.

Here are a few highlights. Please visit the CORE photo albums for more pictures from recent activities:

2017 May 21 - Jumping PoundLoop

May 21 – Jumping Pound Loop

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May 27 - AB Badlands 11 Bridges Bike Trip

May 27 – AB Badlands 11 Bridges Bike Trip

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 June 4 - Seebe Canyon Hike - Mares and Colt

June 4 – Seebe Canyon Hike – Mares and Colt

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June 11 Ha Ling Peak Triumph

June 11 Ha Ling Peak Triumph

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June 2017 Club Meeting

The June club members meeting will be held at the Scarboro Community Centre Tuesday June 27, 2017, 7:00 PM . 

Presentation:Central America Birds and Adventures

Presented by Cathie Newsome and John Hitt
Belize Maya Ruins

Belize Maya Ruins

CORE members Cathie Newsome and John Hitt have made a number of trips to Central America in recent years. At our June meeting, Cathie will talk about their trips to Belize and Panama, with an emphasis on the beautiful birds they saw and the stories they’d like to share about their adventures. Belize is located in Central America and it is bordered to the north by Mexico, to the south and west by Guatemala and to the east by the Caribbean Sea. Panama is a country on the isthmus linking Central and South America. Please join us at the June monthly meeting for a tropical adventure that you won’t want to miss!

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Friends of Kananaskis Country – Trails Fest

June 11 - Trails Fest at Canmore Nordic Centre

June 11 – Trails Fest at Canmore Nordic Centre

The Friends of Kananaskis Trails Fest took place at the  Canmore Nordic Centre June 11. Trails Fest is an opportunity to engage in a fun day of all things trails related, to learn about cool trail projects, explore diverse trail related clubs, groups and associations, and take part in facilitated trail activities,  workshops and presentations. Several members of CORE went out to show off our club, and take part in the bear awareness and Compass/map reading workshops. A great success. We’ll certainly plan to attend this show again next year.

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Canada Day Long Weekend in Kimberley

Plans are fully formed now for a group of CORE members on the Canada Day long weekend, Fri. June 30 to Mon. July 3 (3 nights) for a weekend of hiking and fun in Kimberley, BC, including a big Canada Day potluck dinner on Sat. July 1st to celebrate this special 150th birthday. Julia is has done all the legwork in coordinating this adventure. Trip coordinators for hikes on Saturday and Sunday (different levels) will be posted on the CORE Event Calendar.

Labor Day Long Weekend in Waterton

Join us on the Labour day long weekend Fri Sept. 1 to Mon. Sept. 4 (3 nights) for a weekend of hiking and fun in beautiful Waterton Park, including a potluck dinner on Saturday.  Anne-Marie is coordinating this CORE adventure.
Bear Mountain MotelWe will stay at the Bear Mountain motel, a familiar place and long time favorite of CORE members over the years. As the best cost/ quality motel accommodation in Waterton park, this place will get booked rapidly. They open for business on May 12, and everyone interested is encouraged to book a room ASAP. A deposit in the amount of the first night will be charged on your credit card, but cancellations can be made up to 48 hours prior to the first night for a full refund. The phone number for the Bear Mountain motel is 403-859-2366, and you can also book on-line. Their website is www.bearmountainmotel.com

Additional information on accommodation and planned excursions are posted on the CORE Event Calendar.

Please contact Anne-Marie once you have booked your accommodation. She can also assist you with car pooling and room sharing. Anne-Marie’s contact info is on the CORE members calendar.

Car Pooling

The guidelines related to carpooling for CORE club events are posted on the CORE website at http://corehike.org/?page_id=192 . Please remember that our guidelines state:

The guideline is to contribute $0.20 per kilometer multiplied by two times the distance, from the meeting place to the trailhead, divided by the number of people and pets in the car.

Car pool participants should also try to maximize the number of people per vehicle. For instance, if there there are 10 people, try for a 3 + 3 + 4 mix, not a 4 + 4 + 2 mix.

When participating in joint events with other clubs that use a different formula, just use your judgement and try to be fair to both driver and passengers. At the end of the day, it works out pretty much to the same amount.

Carpool Locations

We’ve found lately that the Edworthy Park location is often very busy on the weekends, so if you are headed out to Banff or Kananaskis, use the Home Road or Valley Ridge Sports Field locations.

First Aid Kits

Preparation—Every participant’s safety is their own responsibility: Carry your own first aid kit with things (like medications) that you regularly count on or may need. It’s not a coordinator’s responsibility to provide either first aid kit or expertise.

You can find some further information an things you might consider putting in your pack on the Wilderness Emergencies blog on the CORE website. Also refer to the CORE website Clothing and Equipment page for tips on first aid essentials to carry in you pack.

Bear Essentials

Parks Canada officials endorse the human voice and bear spray over bear bangers and bells.

Wildsmart

Wildsmart

According to Jon Stuart-Smith, acting Human Wildlife Conflict Specialist with Parks Canada, in an interview with CTV News Calgary:

We recommend bear spray and we don’t recommend things like flares, pen flares, or bear bangers and we don’t recommend things like bear bells. Bear spray has been proven scientifically to be effective and those other things are not necessarily going to be effective.

Stuart-Smith says bear bangers, which are small explosives, carry the potential for injury or escalating an encounter. “If a bear is close to you and you shoot off a bear banger that explodes behind that bear, that might force the bear towards you and make the situation more dangerous. It could make the bear more aggressive because it’s now scared of the noise.”

The flaw with bear bells is their sound means little to a bear. “They just don’t make enough noise and they don’t make a bear aware that you’re human. A little tinkling noise doesn’t necessarily tell a bear that there’s a person nearby.”

To prevent a negative encounter with a bear, Stuart-Smith recommends:

  • Making noise when travelling on a trail
  • Hiking in groups
  • Making sure that dogs are on a leash at all times
  • Not leaving any food unattended at campsites

Name that Flower Contest

Yellow Lady's Slipper - Seebe Dams Hike - JT

Yellow Lady’s Slipper – Seebe Dams Hike – JT

At our July 25 monthly CORE meeting, Julie Walker of Full Circle Adventures will be giving a presentation about our local wildflowers. To help us gain a little familiarity with the topic, let’s have a little contest and see who can name the most flowers that we see out on the trails. When you are out hiking, take some photos of interesting flowers, title them with the name of the flower (common name is fine, scientific name optional), where you saw it, and your initials. Then post it to the CORE photo album for that hike. There is no prize promised (yet), but the winner will receive the admiration and adulation of their fellow club members. For the full set of contest rules, please see the newsletter supplement Name that Flower posted on the CORE website.

Slo-pitch Softball Anyone?

Slo-Pitch Anyone?

Slo-Pitch Anyone?

CORE member Pat is looking for interested parties to join her for slo-pitch softball. This is a mixed league, so both men and women are welcome. Anyone who would like to try slo-pitch should email Pat at – Plranger.ranger557@gmail.com

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For those interested but unfamiliar with slo-pitch, it is a form of softball with slightly different rules. Primary characteristics are under-arm pitching (hence slo-pitch) and no bunting. Here is a link to slo-pitch rules .

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The Ascent of Ha Ling

Team CORE celebrates Summiting Ha Ling Peak 11 June 2017

Team CORE celebrates Summiting Ha Ling Peak 11 June 2017

It was winter – well actually it was the 11th of June – but the snow in the parking lot told a different story. Eleven staunch CORE members had assembled – not to play soccer or cricket but to climb Ha Ling – in the snow. Some of us didn’t want to go – said it would be too cold, too much snow and so on, but Harvey was determined – and so we went – along with at least a few hundred other lost souls who had somehow filled the parking lot and basically shamed us into following! Several of us had never done it before and somehow found pleasure in the unremitting steepness near the summit – the rest of us plodded on through slush and snow and mud. A cold wind blew – and suddenly we were there – on top of the world as far as we could see! We raised our arms to the mountain gods and Harvey took a picture for posterity – but mostly to qualify us for the Georgetown’s Triple Crown Challenge. Now only two more hikes like that. There must be an easier way to get a beer mug!

This report was compiled by your correspondent who is now fully recovered thanks to a large trial run with a Georgetown mug afterwards (which I had to give back).  MG.

What is the Triple Crown?

The Triple Crown of Canmore Challenge is sponsored by the Georgetown Inn in Canmore and involves hiking up Ha Ling Peak, Lady McDonald as far as the tea house and the East End of Rundle. To conquer the challenge, hikers need to take on each of the three trails over the summer, get a photo at each summit, and post those photos to The Georgetown Inn’s Facebook page. Once the photos are posted, stop in at The Georgetown Inn in Canmore and check in with one of the staff members to claim your prize. Conquerors win a beer mug that gets you discounts on refills at The Georgetown and will have their name added to The Triple Crown of Canmore Glory Board, located on the Georgetown’s website.

CORE members Harv, David, Edna, Laurie and Julia Tsang have all signed up to do the Triple Crown. For each peak, Harv has to post photos on the Georgetown Inn Facebook Page to prove that those four people completed the peak. After they do all three peaks, they go to the Georgetown Inn where they will be awarded a free beer mug. Good luck and safe climbing, CORE Triple Crown challengers!

Random Stuff

The Bold and ColdA History of 25 Classic Climbs in the Canadian Rockies
by Brandon Pullan

A book recommended by Pat (and she doesn’t even fancy dangling from ropes).

Over the past 100 years, climbers have been pushing standards in the Canadian Rockies. From long alpine ridges to steep north faces, the Rockies are synonymous with cutting-edge ascents. Peaks such as Robson, Chephren, Kitchener, the Twins and Alberta elude the many and reward the few. Many of the big faces were climbed between the 1960s and 1990, the golden age of alpinism in the Rockies. The men and women who first were part of that set high standards.

You can find a complete review of this book on this Rock and Ice Climbers Magazine article. The book is available at various online bookstores, as well as the Public Library.

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Communications - 2016-2017

ANnIE – Communications – 2016-2017

Goodbye from ANnIE

This will be the last newsletter posted by ANnIE, as she has to return to her pack. But she will be keeping an eye on us from deep in the woods. Pat and Carol will be taking over the newsletter for the coming year, so you happy readers of our missive will be treated to some new and interesting content.

See you on the the trails…

ANnIE

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Name that Flower

Stonecrop in Full Bloom

Stonecrop in Full Bloom

At our July 25 monthly CORE meeting, Julie Walker of Full Circle Adventures will be giving a presentation about our local wildflowers. We’ll learn how so many of our native wildflowers play a key role in the food forest for wildlife and humans. The plants of Southern Alberta are the key focus and the ecological influences that have affected them and how they are under threat by changes to the foothills landscape.

Julie has been an outdoor educator and guide for over 25 years in Southern Alberta and her company Full Circle Adventures has been running since 2004.

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If you want to learn more about Ms. Walker and what she has to offer, you can contact her at:

Sweet Jacob's Ladder

Sweet Jacob’s Ladder

Julie Walker, Owner/Program Director and Guide

Full Circle Adventures

403-968-4816

info@full-circle-adventures.com
www.fullcircleadventures.com

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Purple Virgin's Bower (Clematis occidentalis) - sc

Purple Virgin’s Bower (Clematis occidentalis) – Fullerton Loop – sc

In the meantime, let’s have a little contest and see who can name the most flowers that we see out on the trails. When you are out hiking, take some photos of interesting flowers, title them with the name of the flower (common name is fine, scientific name optional), where you saw it, and your initials (see example to the left). Then post it to the CORE photo album for that hike. Since we quite often combine photos by different participants into a single photo album for a given hike, please include your initials, and make sure the person who set up the photo album includes your name in the album credits (you can edit this yourself in the album description). We will only count 2 photos per participant per album, and no duplicates, so please don’t post every flower you saw, or put your initials on just the 1 or 2 you want counted. We’ll count from the beginning of June until the weekend of July 22/23.  The CORE webmaster will recuse himself from the competition, but all other CORE members are eligible. There is no prize promised (yet), but the winner will receive the admiration and adulation of their fellow club members.

To help you identify flowers, here are some useful links:

List of wildflowers of the Canadian Rocky Mountains

Alberta WOW – Alberta Wildflowers

Index to Wildflowers of the Canadian Rockies and nearby foothills, prairies, and the Waterton-Glacier area

We’ll announce the winner at the July 25 CORE meeting (watch the CORE home page for time and place).

If you haven’t figured out yet how to post or add pictures to the CORE photo albums, you can email the photos (best resolution) to your hike leader, she/he should be able to get them uploaded for you. There are also instructions at this link on the CORE website: http://corehike.org/?page_id=2352

And if you are totally new to CORE and don’t know where to find the Photo Albums, look in the dropdown under Activities along the top of the CORE Home page at http://corehike.org/

To those of you who are already labeling your photos  with a short description of where/what it represents, thank you. It makes the albums much more interesting.

…..enjoy, and see you on the trails….

CORE Webmaster Stu

 

 

 

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May 2017 CORE Newsletter

EXECUTIVE CORNER

Your CORE executive continues to work on projects to improve the club experience and promote safety.

AGM and Elections for next year’s Executive

The AGM is on Tuesday, May 30 at our regular meeting venue,  the Scarboro Community Centre 1727 – 14th Avenue S.W. All members and those interested in joining CORE are invited to attend.

Come out and get reacquainted with fellow members, share some food and refreshments, watch the slideshow of the past year’s events, and participate in the election of the 2017/2018 Executive.

Many of the current executive members have served on the board for several years and have chosen to step aside this time around. If you are interested in serving on The Executive, here are the positions with the open roles noted:

  • —Chairperson: (open)
  • —Co-Chairperson: (open)
  • —Secretary: (open)
  • —Treasurer: (open)
  • —Membership Coordinator: (open)
  • —Executive Trip Coordinator: (open)
  • —Communications Coordinator: (open)
  • —Presentations Coordinator: (Carol will continue this role)
  • —Webmaster: (Stu will continue in this role)
  • —Member-at-Large (Craig will continue in this role as the CORE Facebook manager)
  • Member-at-Large for special projects and assist Presentations Coordinator (open)

If you are interested in submitting your nomination for one of these positions, please contact our current chairperson Mike Galbraith.

How to contact a member of the CORE Executive

If you are a current CORE member, go to the Executive Contact Info page on the CORE website (corehike.org) and use your member password (the same one you use to access the CORE calendar) to log in. The Executive members are listed with their roles and email addresses.

Filling up the CORE Calendar for Spring and Summer Events

Calling all hikers, planners, leaders, day-trippers, part-time walkers, photographers, nature lovers, cyclists, tennis buffs and anyone who can spell “outdoors” to join us as we load the CORE Calendar for the summer.

Even if you have never led a hike – or even if you don’t know the way – there will be lots of help and mentors and co-trip leaders who would be delighted to come along with you.

This event will be hosted by Mike on May 18. See the CORE calendar for details.

And, as a reminder to all old-hand hike leaders and new ones alike, please review the EVENT COORDINATORS’ GUIDELINES posted on the CORE website.  These are a collection of “tribal knowledge” representing years of experience of people seasoned in mountain recreation. They are meant to promote safety in our outdoor activities.

Attach your Membership Card to your Backpack

As hike leaders, we get to know a lot of the regular attendees of hikes and other outings. But new activity leaders may not know everybody, and members who don’t come out very often may not be known to the activity leader. If you don’t have your membership card with you, then you may be asked to sign a guest waiver.

 

ACTIVITY SCOREBOARD

April/May 2017

As Winter tapers off to Spring, we’ve started to have some early season hikes and urban walks.

A few highlights:

April 22 - Wilderness First Aid Course

April 22 – Wilderness First Aid Course

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April 29 - Porcupine Hill

April 29 – Porcupine Hill

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May 3 - Fish Creek Park - Mallard Point

May 3 – Fish Creek Park – Mallard Point

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May 2017 Club Meeting

The April club members meeting will be held at the Scarboro Community Centre TUESDAY, 30 May, 7:00 pm. 

Agenda: The AGM:

See The Executive Corner as well as the CORE Calendar for details.

So Long to the 2016-2017 Executive

Pat, Kim, Mike, David, Stu, Fiona, Carol, Mary, Jorge (Craig and Mark missing)

Pat, Kim, Mike, David, Stu, Fiona, Carol, Mary, Jorge (Craig and Mark missing)

 The CORE Executive for 2016-2017 wishes you a fond adieu. We’ve really enjoyed working for the club this past year (and for some of us, these past many years), but now it’s time to move over and let others apply their talents to make CORE an enjoyable and safe club in which to indulge your enjoyment of outdoor activities. 

As the song goes…..

Musical notes

So long, farewell, auf Wiedersehen, goodbye
[We] leave and heave a sigh and say goodbye — Goodbye!

[and so on]

Followup to the Wilderness First Aid Course

April 22 - Wilderness First Aid CourseThe Wilderness Safety course presented to 24 CORE members on April 22 was a great success. We learned the basics of treating shock and damaged limbs, and the most important lesson – PREPARATION. Please see the blog on the core website for a summary of the day’s activities and what we learned. What’s in your pack? What’s in your plan? Takeaways from CORE’S Wilderness Safety Workshop

Our trainer Nicole Elder did an outstanding job of keeping us entertained and engaged  during this day of instruction. For additional information on additional courses, you can contact her at:

Nicole Elder … 403 968 9726

Alberta Hiking Association Newsletter

The AHA has requested outdoor clubs again this year to submit summer hiking/walking stories for their June newsletter. We are very pleased that they have accepted a submission from CORE, written by Carol about a summer hike in Waterton Park in 2005. A version of this article is also published on the CORE website as: Waterton’s Rowe Lakes/Lineham Ridge Trail

Friends of Kananaskis Country – Trails Fest

Celebrate Kananaskis trails, people and culture at the Canmore Nordic Centre June 11, 10:00 AM to 3: PM. Pat and Kim will be representing CORE at this event. More information at http://www.kananaskis.org/trails-fest/

Canada Day Long Weekend in Kimberley

Join fellow CORE members on the Canada Day long weekend, Fri. June 30 to Mon. July 3 (3 nights) for a weekend of hiking and fun in Kimberley, BC, including a big Canada Day potluck dinner on Sat. July 1st to celebrate this special 150th birthday. Julia is has done all the legwork in coordinating this adventure.

Trickle Creek LodgeWe will stay at the Trickle Creek Lodge at the base of the ski hill in Kimberley. a contract has been negotiated  with them for discounted rooms for CORE members for Studio, One Bedroom, and Two Bedroom suites.
To date (11 May) there are 1 Studio, 10 one Bedroom and 8 two bedroom suites still available.

We also have, for our private use, the outdoor patio area as well as an indoor room off the patio for our potluck Canada Day celebration on July 1st.

Accommodation Rates – Booked Based on Availability ONLY
For reservations please call
1-877-282-1200 Ext. 2

Please note: Rooms blocked are released on May 31, 2017. Any reservations made after this date will be made strictly based on availability. 72 Hour Cancellation period applies, & a Major Credit Card is required to guarantee all accommodation reservations.

**PLEASE NOTE** When you call to reserve a room, you MUST QUOTE that you are part of the CORE Hiking Club. This will assure that you will receive the discounted rate provided!
WE NEED TRIP COORDINATORS for hikes on Saturday and Sunday (different levels). Please consider coordinating or co-coordinating a hike. Julia has several good trail maps and information on different trails. There is also a lot of info online of course.

For more detailed information on accommodations and planned  hikes, please visit the members Event Calendar on the CORE website.

Please contact Julia when you have booked a room, with names, dates etc. Julia’s contact info is on the Event Calendar posting.

Labor Day Long Weekend in Waterton

Join us on the Labour day long weekend Fri Sept. 1 to Mon. Sept. 4 (3 nights) for a weekend of hiking and fun in beautiful Waterton Park, including a potluck dinner on Saturday.  Anne-Marie is coordinating this CORE adventure.
Bear Mountain MotelWe will stay at the Bear Mountain motel, a familiar place and long time favorite of CORE members over the years. As the best cost/ quality motel accommodation in Waterton park, this place will get booked rapidly. They open for business on May 12, and everyone interested is encouraged to book a room ASAP. A deposit in the amount of the first night will be charged on your credit card, but cancellations can be made up to 48 hours prior to the first night for a full refund. The phone number for the Bear Mountain motel is 403-859-2366, and you can also book on-line. Their website is www.bearmountainmotel.com

Additional information on accommodation and planned excursions are posted on the CORE Event Calendar.

Please contact Anne-Marie once you have booked your accommodation. She can also assist you with car pooling and room sharing. Anne-Marie’s contact info is on the CORE members calendar.

Random Stuff

7 things to do in the Rockies this May & June

You’ve made it through winter, and summer is on the horizon. You can feel it, taste it, smell it – and nothing makes someone want to get out and get away like the promise of summer. May and June are fantastic months when summer isn’t quite here, but feels like it is. It’s a great time for a weekend getaway to the Rockies, where the summer crowds haven’t yet arrived, but everything is turning green and gorgeous.

So pack up the car and head out to the mountains. Here are 7 things to do in the Rockies this May & June.

Hiking is great way to spend time in Banff, Lake Louise, and Yoho National Park. Springtime hikes can be a little muddy or a tad snowy, but the hikes listed below are usually the first ones to be snow free. They are also kid-friendly too, so bring the whole family along.

  • Fenland Trail (Banff Townsite, right before ‘Welcome to Banff’ sign when you take the second exit into Banff) – This 2km loop is ideal for small children and bikes, and is a lovely way to spend an hour. Watch the river, or climb over old logs.
  • Sundance Canyon (Banff Townsite) – An easy 4 km hike for those who want beautiful scenery and exercise, but nothing too strenuous. A nice introduction to springtime hiking.
  • Wapta Falls (Yoho National Park) – Often one of the first snow-free trails in Yoho, this hike is enjoyable for the whole family, and a chance to see one of Yoho’s largest waterfalls

Some of the festivals on offer

  • Saturday May 16: Banff Centre Children’s FestivalFrom plays to face painting to mountain movies, there are a ton of fun activities planned for this festival. A fantastic festival for kids of all ages!
  • June 14 – August 24: Banff Summer Arts FestivalEvery summer The Banff Centre presents an arts festival featuring theatre, music, indigenous arts, visual arts – truly something for everyone. Check schedule for details.
  • June 19-June 20: Performance in the ParkThis year the performers include Joel Plaskett Emergency and K-OS. This two day celebration of incredible music performed in a stunning outdoor setting is not to be missed!
  • June 21: Banff MarathonThe Banff Marathon, half marathon, and 10k is a truly unique experience for participants and spectators. Imagine running through some of the most breathtaking scenery in the world, while pushing to see what your body is capable of. A day to remember, always.

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See you on the the trails…

ANnIE

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Vocal Latitudes World Music Choir May 13 2017

Vocal Latitudes World Music Choir will be performing a concert “For the Beauty of the Earth”on Saturday May 13. One of our CORE members, a keen x-c skier and hiker, also sings in the choir.

Place:
1703 1st Street NW, Unitarian Church of Calgary  (Doors open at 7:00)
Directed by: Frank Rackow
Accompanied by: Faye White, pianist, and Robin Tufts, percussion
Special Guests: Christie Simmons and Quintessentials
“For the Beauty of the Earth” is an uplifting choral performance by Vocal Latitudes, a world music community choir.
Partners with: Calgary Public Library and Sun Life Financial Arts and Culture Pass

Tickets $20 Buy tickets for Vocal Latitudes World Music Choir:  For the Beauty of the Earth
or: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2909340

12 years and under are free
Low income, pay what you can at the door

If you wish to attend, please purchase advance tickets online at:

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2909340

Posted by Stu. CORE Members, see the CORE Event Calendar for  contact details.

Vocal Latitudes Spring 2017 Poster

Vocal Latitudes Spring 2017 Poster

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